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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (88 total).

Larsen,B. n.d.. Symbolic logic: A promising decision making tool. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 25 pp. (Quantods series no.: 1-8 (5))

Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service. 2018. Vulnerable youth: Background and policies. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 60 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses federal efforts to help vulnerable youth make successful transitions to adulthood in six areas: workforce development, education, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, social services, public health, and national and community service. It describes risk factors, positive youth development, the evolution of the federal role in assisting vulnerable youth from 1912 through the present, and federal efforts to improve coordination among programs for vulnerable youth.

Contact: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20540-7500, Fax: Web Site: http://www.loc.gov/crsinfo Available from the website. Document Number: RL33975 · Version 28 · Updated.

Keywords: Federal programs, High risk adolescents, History, Transitions, Youth development

U.S. Children's Bureau, Child Welfare Information Gateway, FRIENDS National Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. 2016. Building community, building hope: 2016 prevention resource guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Familes, 104 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information, strategies, and resources to help communities support and strengthen families and promote the well-being of children and youth. It focuses on protective factors that build on family strengths and promote optimal child and youth development. Topics include implementing a protective factors approach, working with families using protective factors, and using protective factors as a framework for community partnerships. Contents include tools and strategies to assist service providers in integrating protective factors into community programs and systems. Tips sheets for parents and caregivers are provided.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Community programs, Consumer education materials, Families, Program improvement, Protective factors, Public private partnerships, Resources for professionals, Service delivery systems, Systems development, Youth

FrameWorks Institute. 2016. Shifting gears on juvenile justice: A FrameWorks communications toolkit. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit models how to frame the juvenile justice system and related issues as important policy fields and matters of public concern. Topics include the science of adolescent development and the need to incorporate a developmental perspective into criminal justice policies designed for youth; why the current approaches to juvenile crime aren't working; and age-appropriate treatments and interventions that improve outcomes for those already in the system and preventive programs that divert more youth away from juvenile detention and towards programs that better serve their needs. Contents include sample "ready to go" communications that can be used as is or adapted and repurposed for an organization's needs, communications examples that demonstrate the "do's and don'ts" of the framing recommendations, graphics that model the key concepts of the recommendations, and annotations that explain the framing strategies being illustrated.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Communication, Interdisciplinary approach, Intervention, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Prevention, Public awareness materials, Systems development, Youth services

National Children's Oral Health Foundation. 2016. #MySmileMatters national youth engagement plan. Charlotte, NC: National Children's Oral Health Foundation, 11 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a model for helping adolescents and adults integrate oral health advocacy, learning, and teaching opportunities into their schools and communities. Contents include activities to increase oral health literacy by changing beliefs, activities to change oral health habits by changing behavior, and activities to affect whole populations by changing the environment. The plan also outlines steps for adolescents and youth groups to become members of the #MySmileMatters Youth Movement, a national initiative to engage adolescents in oral health and wellness.

Contact: National Children's Oral Health Foundation, 4108 Park Road, Suite 300, Charlotte, NC 28209, Telephone: (704) 350-1600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 559-9838 Fax: (704) 350-1333 E-mail: info@ncohf.org Web Site: http://www.ncohf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Behavior change, Beliefs, Community action, Community participation, Health behavior, Learning, Models, National initiatives, Oral health, Policy development, Schools, Strategic plans, Teaching, Youth

Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. 2016. Preparing for the road ahead: Helping young people transition from foster care to adulthood. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the successes and vision of a national initiative to help young people transition from foster care and thrive. Contents include information about the initiative's impact, timeline, core strategies, outcome areas, and next steps. The report describes how the initiative is helping young people in foster care achieve critical milestones in permanence, education, employment, financial capability, housing, physical and mental health, and social capital; how the initiative integrates young people's voices into its work; and how it collaborates with national and local partners, policymakers, and young people to create conditions that improve outcomes for youth transitioning to adulthood.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Collaboration, Foster care, National initiatives, Outcome and process assessment, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Public private partnerships, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development, Youth in transition programs

Wilson K, Dworetzky B, Comeau M. 2016. Health care coverage and financing for children with special health care needs: A tutorial to address inequities. Boston, MA: Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 51 pp.

Annotation: These modules are designed to help maternal and child leaders, family leaders, and other stakeholders understand and address health care coverage inequities that exist among children with special health care needs (CSHCN) based on race, ethnicity, income, immigration status, language, and level of functional difficulty. Contents include 6 modules on topics such as the language used to describe differences and tools and examples of policies, programs, and partnerships to improve access to coverage and financing of care for CSHCN. A worksheet is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Catalyst Center, the National Center for Health Insurance and Financing for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Boston University School of Public Health, Center for Advancing Health Policy and Practice, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA 02218-2526, Telephone: (617) 638-1930 E-mail: mcomeau@bu.edu Web Site: http://cahpp.org/project/the-catalyst-center Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Data analysis, Equal opportunities, Financing, Health insurance, Language barriers, Policy development, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Special health care needs, Young adults, Youth

First Focus. 2015. Big ideas: Pioneering change–Innovative ideas for children and families. Washington, DC: First Focus, 153 pp.

Annotation: This compilation of 14 papers outlines ways to create opportunities for families in poverty. Topics include include emerging two-generation policies, using housing rules to tackle education inequalities for minority children, the costs of raising children, implementing a child allowance program, Roth IRAs and savings accounts for children, community schools and educational equity, higher-education tax spending, coordinating health care with home visits for new families, a policy agenda to expand economic opportunity, immigration decisions and children, systems of care to address the needs of commercially sexually exploited youth, and practices and policies to reduce the burden of childhood asthma.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Child health, Equal opportunities, Families, Family centered care, Intergenerational programs, Low income groups, Minority groups, Models, Organizational change, Policy development, Poverty, Service delivery, Systems development, Vulnerability, Youth

Antosh AA, Blair M, Edwards K, Goode T, Hewitt A, Izzo M, Johnson DR, Raynor O, Riddle I, Shanley JL, Walker R, Wehmeyer M. 2014. A comprehensive approach to transition. Silver Spring, MD: Association of University Centers on Disabilities, 21 pp.

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: How do young adults fare and what characteristics are associated with a lower-risk transition?. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 12 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief identifies patterns and transitions during emerging adulthood and the likelihood that young adults will experience a lower-risk transition to adulthood. Topics include differences between groups by gender, race and ethnicity, and nativity status; transition patterns over time; and implications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Data, Longitudinal studies, Risk factors, Transitions, Trends, Young adults, Youth, Youth development

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: The role of supportive relationships and regular religious involvement. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents findings from a study to assess the long-term implications of supportive relationships and religious involvement, by assessing whether young adults who reported having positive relationships with their parents, teachers, or friends or who reported weekly religious involvement when they were adolescents were more likely to later have lower-risk transitions to adulthood relative to young adults who had not reported these positive social connections as adolescents, even taking sociodemographic background and negative childhood experiences into account. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Longitudinal studies, Relationships, Religion, Research, Risk factors, Social factors, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development

Toldson IA, Manekin SD. 2014. Building bridges: Connecting out-of-school time to classroom success among school-age Black males in the District of Columbia. Washington, DC: D.C. Children and Youth Investment Trust Corporation, 74 pp.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network. 2014. LGBTQ youth and sexual abuse: Information for mental health professionals. Los Angeles, CA, and Durham, NC: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 7 pp.

Murphey D, Barry M, Vaughn B. 2013. Positive mental health: Resilience. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp. (Adolescent health highlight)

Annotation: This report presents research findings on characteristics that are associated with adolescent resilience, describes program strategies that promote resilience, and discusses links between resilience and avoidance of risk-taking behaviors. Topics include relationships and social skills, hormonal and physical changes, self confidence, spirituality, emotional self-regulation, and overall well-being. Resources and references for additional information on resilience in adolescence is provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: Pub. no. 2013-03.

Keywords: Adolescence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Coping, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Resilience, Risk taking, Youth

Autism Speaks. 2013. Leading the way: Autism-friendly youth organization guide. New York, NY: Autism Speaks, 65 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information to help community youth organizations develop programs to ensure that youth with autism are offered the same formative opportunities that are made available to their typical peers. The guide is designed to prepare community organizations to serve youth and families with autism and to learn how to integrate youth with autism into existing youth programs. Included are results from a national survey of community youth organizations conduced by Youth Speaks in 2012; an overview of autism and the challenges it presents to community organizations; and strategies for communicating with families and training staff who work with this population.

Contact: Autism Speaks, 1 East 33rd Street, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 252-8584 Fax: (212) 252-8676 E-mail: contactus@autismspeaks.org Web Site: http://www.autismspeaks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Community programs, Developmental disabilities, Manuals, Program development, Youth

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Health Resources in Action. 2013. Power Prism® strategies for advocacy and for engaging youth. Boston, MA: Health Resources in Action, 2 items (1 video, 1 hr., 6 min.; 1 set of 53 slides).

Annotation: This webinar, held on June 17, 2013, describes a model for advocating for policy creation and change that can be used in a variety of public health areas including tobacco control and food systems change. It focuses on engaging youth in the process of policy change through case studies and examples, using the youth development approach.

Contact: Health Resources in Action, 95 Berkeley Street, Boston, MA 02116, Telephone: (617) 451-0049 Secondary Telephone: (617) 451-0007 Fax: (617) 451-0062 Web Site: http://www.hria.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Case studies, Models, Multimedia, Policy development, Systems development, Young adults, Youth development

Boyd LW. 2013. Theraeputic foster care: Exceptional care for complex, trauma-impacted youth in foster care. Washington, DC: First Focus, State Policy and Advocacy Reform Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about best practices in therapeutic or treatment foster care (TFC), a clinical intervention for youth from birth to age 18 who have severe mental, emotional, or behavioral health needs. Topics include essential partners; building relationships among provider agencies and child advocates; example practices in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, Oklahoma, Nebraska; efforts to expand the focus beyond safety and permanency to well-being for youth in therapeutic foster care; and public policy challenges.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Behavioral medicine, Children with special health care needs, Foster care, Foster parents, Health services delivery, Intervention, Medically fragile children, Mental health, Policy development, Psychological needs, Reimbursement, Relationships, Therapeutics, Training, Trauma care, Youth

Healthy Teen Network. [2012]. The unique sexual and reproductive health needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 2 pp. (Fast facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides data on American adolescents (ages 13 to 18) from 1990 to 2002 who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ). It includes statistics on the percentage of adolescents who identify as LGBTQ; describes the sexual and risk-taking behavior of this population; discusses the increased risk of sexuality transmitted infection (STIs), HIV, and pregnancy; points to the absence of sex education courses and materials that address sexual orientation; describes the difficulties that LGBTQ adolescents face in obtaining information, services, and support; and provides tips to help individuals, educators, and organizations successfully include LGBTQ youth. A resource list provides links to related websites.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Homosexuality, Psychosocial development, Sexuality education, Statistics, Youth

Huberman BK. 2012. Let's Talk Month planning guidebook. (Rev. ed.). Washington, D.C.: Advocates for Youth, 132 pp.

Annotation: This Let's Talk Month planning guidebook focuses on the importance of communication between adults and young people to help young people develop responsible behavior about sexuality. It includes information on planning and implementing Let's Talk Month; involving youth and youth-adult partnerships to promote parent-child communication; and working with media. It also includes sample forms and materials, work sheets and handouts for facilitators, and other resources.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent sexuality, Communication skills, Guidelines, Parent education programs, Sexuality education, Youth development

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.