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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (45 total).

Arlitsch K, O'Brien PS. 2013. Improving the visibility and use of digital repositories through SEO. Chicago, IL: ALA TechSource, 128 pp. (A LITA guide)

Annotation: This book discusses search engine optimization (SEO), including what it is, why it is important, how to improve your library's SEO efforts, how Internet search engine indexing works, targeting your audience, Google Scholar and institutional repositories, and measuring success.

Contact: American Library Association, 50 East Huron, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (800) 545-2433 Secondary Telephone: (888) 814-7692 Fax: (312) 944-3897 E-mail: library@ala.org Web Site: http://www.ala.org $65,00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1555709068.

Keywords: Design, Digital libraries, Information management, Libraries, Technology, Web sites, World Wide Web

Haigler P. 2012. Using social media tools to advocate for infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document describes common social media tools and presents tips on how they can be used to reach policymakers, the media, fellow advocates, and others who have the ability to influence public policy to positively affect outcomes for infants, toddlers, and families. The document explains what social media is and discusses social networking and blogging.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Families, Public policy, World Wide Web, Internet, Young children

American Public Health Association, Health Communication Working Group. [2011]. A guidance document to the navigation and use of the Healthy People 2020 website. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, Health Communication Working Group, 4 pp.

Annotation: This guide describes the Healthy People 2020 website and explains how online users (public health professionals as well as the general public) can take advantage of the site's features. It includes a brief overview of the Healthy People 2020 initiative, including its overarching goals; a description of the features on the site's home page; and summaries of the information available in each section of the site. The guide also describes the site's relational database called Closer Look, Health Disparities, which can be used to access a wide variety of data from federal agencies. Information on external Web 2.0 tools, mobile applications, and GIS-mapping data sites is also provided.

Contact: HealthyPeople.gov, Web Site: http://www.healthypeople.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Guidelines, Health status disparities, Healthy People 2020, Information sources, Information systems, Internet, Technology, World wide web

National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management. 2011. Early hearing detection and intervention: Website resource guide. Logan, UT: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, 31 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about and examples of critical components of high-quality websites that support early hearing detection and intervention (EDHI). The guide is designed to increase EDHI administrators' knowledge about key elements of effective websites. The guide also helps administrators work with partners, particularly those that design, develop, and market their sites. The guide includes information about the importance of creating standards-compliant sites that are accessible to those with disabilities. Topics include content, design and layout, key components, and marketing and management. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, Utah Sate University, 2615 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, Telephone: (435) 797-3584 Web Site: http://www.infanthearing.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Design, Diagnosis, Disabilities, Early intervention, Graphic design, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Marketing, Resource materials, Screening, Standards, World wide web

National Association of County and City Health Officials. [2009]. Maternal, child, and adolescent health toolkit. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials,

Annotation: This online toolkit contains downloadable resources highlighting programs and practices to help local health departments with their work related to maternal and child health and adolescent health. The toolkit is divided into the following categories: programs, publications, toolbox, public health advocacy, press room, and membership. Users may also request help (including help finding a tool), bookmark tools, and submit tools.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, Child health, City agencies, Community agencies, Internet, MCH, Maternal health, Programs, Public health, Resource materials, World Wide Web

U.S. Office of Management and Budget. 2009-. Expectmore.gov. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Management and Budget,

Annotation: This Web site provides information about federal programs and how they are performing. The site describes how programs are assessed and rated using the Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) and provides a list of federal programs that have been rated. Users may view a list of programs that are performing or are not performing, or they may select programs by topic or by agency. The listing shows the agency, the program name, the funding level, the date of the last PART assessment, and the rating the program received. Links to each program's home page are also provided.

Contact: U.S. Office of Management and Budget, 725 17th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20503, Telephone: (202) 395-3080 Fax: (202) 395-3888 Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Federal programs, Model programs, Program evaluation, Resource materials, World Wide Web

American Bar Association Center on Children and the Law, National Business Group on Health, American Academy of Pediatrics, and National Institute for Health Care Management. 2009. Medical homes for children. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webcast, which was conducted on April 21, 2009, highlights the importance of how children uniquely benefit from the medical home, shares current efforts to implement the medical home across multiple stakeholder groups, and seeks to spur future collaborative efforts in support of the medical home. The webcast can be viewed in various formats, including video + slides + captioning, presentation slides, transcript (html or pdf), or audio only. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Multimedia, Child health, Collaboration, Medical home, Primary care, World wide web

Fox S, Jones S. 2009. The social life of health information: Americans' pursuit of health takes place within a widening network of both online and offline sources. Washington, DC: Pew Internet and American Life Project, 72 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes a national survey about the social impact of the Internet on health care. Topics include types of Internet or traditional sources used by consumers, how information gathered is used to communicate with health professionals, and who is likely to be using which services. Contents include a summary of findings, the shifting landscape, social media and health, readers and listeners versus writers and creators, the impact of online health resources, and trends to watch.

Contact: Pew Internet and American Life Project, 1615 L Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-4500 Fax: 202-419-4505 E-mail: data@pewinternet.org Web Site: http://www.pewinternet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education, Health attitudes, Health literacy, Information sources, Internet, Patient education, Physician patient relations, Social media, Surveys, Trends, World Wide Web

Rosen Publishing Online. 2009. Teen health and wellness: Real life, real answers . New York, NY: Rosen Publishing Online,

Annotation: This Web site provides students with curricular support and self-help on topics including diseases, drugs, alcohol, nutrition, fitness, mental health, diversity, family life, and more. Users can subscribe for a fee or use a 3-day free trial. Sample articles on anorexia nervosa, asthma, and decision making are available.

Contact: Rosen Publishing Group, 29 East 21st Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (800) 237-9932 Fax: (888) 436-4643 Web Site: http://www.rosenpublishing.com/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption, Drug use, Eating disorders, Families, Food, Grief, Mental health, Nutrition, Relationships, Safety, World Wide Web

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2009. Planning and preparedness for children's needs in public health emergencies. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,

Annotation: This webcast featured a panel discussion of pediatric preparedness initiatives and insights from pediatric emergency preparedness planners. During the webcast, participants learned about some of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's pediatric emergency preparedness resources, heard from the National Commission on Children and Disasters, and learned about the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response's Hospital Preparedness Program. Presenters offered perspectives on both clinical preparedness and school-based preparedness. This resource includes a recording and transcript of the webcast, PowerPoint slides, frequently asked questions, and links to additional resources.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Multimedia, Children, Disaster planning, Emergencies, Pediatrics, Schools, World Wide Web

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Safe Schools/Healthy Students. 2009. Preventing cyberbullying in schools and the community. Newton, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper offers information about how to prevent cyberbullying in schools and in the community. The paper provides information on what bullying and cyberbullying are, and their consequences; the differences between cyberbullying and other bullying; facts about cyberbullying; and what schools and parents can do.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Communities, Parents, Prevention, Schools, World Wide Web

Lehman T, Nikkel T. 2008. Making library web sites usable: A LITA guide. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman, 184 pp. (LITA guides; no. 14)

Annotation: This book's purpose is to provide solid grounding about library Web site design and testing for beginners and to introduce experienced library Web site designers to to new techniques. The book is divided into 17 chapters. Chapter 1 introduces usability assessment and its application to library Web sites. Chapters 2-8 discuss the primary assessment techniques: heuristic evaluations, surveys of library users and and others in the target population the library is meant to serve, focus group interviews, card sorting to analyze how library Web site information should be grouped, paper prototyping of Web pages, developing and conducting usability testing, and Web server logs analysis. Chapters 9-11 focus on general usability testing issues, including attracting users for testing, low cost usability recording, and communicating usability results effectively. Chapters 12-17 present usability case studies in several types of libraries. The book also includes a bibliiography that lists sources for additional information. An index is included, as well.

Contact: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 50 East Huron, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (866) 672-6657 E-mail: info@neal-schuman.com Web Site: http://www.neal-schuman.com Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 9781555706203.

Keywords: Assessment, Case studies, Evaluation, Libraries, Library services, Technology, Testing, World Wide Web

Library of Congress, Working Group on the Future of Bibliographic Control. 2008. On the record. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report, which focuses on the issue of bibliographic control, is intended for use by the library community, policymakers, and decision-makers. The repot sets forth recommendations, including (1) increasing the efficiency of bibliographic production, (2) transferring effort into high-value activity, (3) positioning technology for the future by recognizing that the Internet is both a technology platform and the appropriate platform for delivering library standards, (4) positioning the library community for the future by facilitating the incorporation of evaluative and other user-supplied information into resource descriptions, and (5) strengthening the library profession through education and the development of measurements that will inform decision-making.

Contact: Library of Congress, Government Documents Section, 101 Independence Avenue at First Street, S.E., Washington, DC 20540, Telephone: (202) 707-5000 Fax: (202) 707-0380 E-mail: http://www.loc.gov/rr/aslalib/ Web Site: http://www.loc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Education, Information services, Librarians, Libraries, Public policy, Resource materials, Trends, World Wide Web

National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Safe Schools/Healthy Students. [2007]. Implementing evidence-based interventions (EBIs) with fidelity. Newton, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention,

Annotation: This webcast, facilitated by Wayne Harding, Ed.D., Ph.D. (founder and director of Projects for Social Science Research & Evaluation, Inc.) and Scott W. Formica, research associate, focuses on implementing interventions with fidelity--that is, remaining true to developer-defined components of a program. Facilitator bios, a PowerPoint presentation, and notes from a teleconference held on March 22, 2007 are included.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Conferences, Program development, Programs, World Wide Web

U.S. Office of Minority Health. [2007]. African American infant mortality campaign: A healthy baby begins with you. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, 2 pp.

Annotation: This Web site provides information about a national campaign to raise awareness about infant mortality with an emphasis on the African-American community. The site includes a link to a media kit, articles, information about community outreach, radio and video public service announcements, and other information, including Phase II of this campaign, Preconception Peer Educators (PPE) Program.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health Resource Center, P.O. Box 37337, Washington, DC 20013-7337, Telephone: (800) 444-6472 Secondary Telephone: (301) 251-1432 Fax: (301) 251-2160 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=1&lvlid=3 Available from the website.

Keywords: , Blacks, Infant mortality, Outreach, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Resource materials, World Wide Web

Rideout V. 2007. Parents, children, and media: A Kaiser Family Foundation survey. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report is based on a national survey of 1,008 parents of children and adolescents ages 2-17, along with information gleaned from a series of focus groups held with parents across the country. The survey explores such issues as media content, media ratings and the V-Chip, media monitoring, educational media, and the Internet. The report discusses the survey methodology and provides information about survey findings in the following categories: (1) inappropriate content in the media, (2) advertising, obesity, and attention deficit disorder, (3) educational media, (4) media monitoring and influence, (5) media ratings and the V-Chip, and (6) the Internet.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Advertising, Attention deficit disorder, Child behavior, Educational materials, Focus groups, Mass media, Obesity, Parents, Surveys, World wide web

De Rosa C, Cantrell J, Havens A, Hawk J, Jenkins L. 2007. Sharing, privacy, and trust in our networked world: A report to the OCLC membership. Dublin, OH: OCLC, ca. 280 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on a study that explored the social networking attitudes and habits of users and librarians. The reports explored the following main areas: (1) user practices and preferences on their favorite social spaces; (2) the origins of social networking; (3) user attitudes about privace and trust online; (4) librarian online habits and attitudes vs. the habits and attitudes of the general public; and (5) attitudes about combining the benefits of social spaces with the offerings of libraries. The report also discusses in-depth interviews with information services professionals to gain insight into social networking, trust, and privacy online. Report highlights and conclusions are offered. The report includes six appendices: (1) college students' use of Internet services; (2) glossary, (3) people consulted, (4) readings and other sources, (5) about OCLC, and (6) comparative timeline.

Contact: OCLC Online Computer Library Center, 6565 Kilgour Place, Dublin, OH 43017-3395, Telephone: (614) 764-6000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 848-5878 Fax: (614) 764-6096 E-mail: oclc@oclc.org Web Site: http://www.oclc.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-55653-370-5.

Keywords: Attitudes, Consumers, Librarians, Libraries, Social behavior, Trust, World Wide Web

New York Academy of Medicine. 2006-. Resource guide for public health preparedness. New York, NY: New York Academy of Medicine,

Annotation: This Web site includes information about public health preparedness. The site includes a searchable resource guide database with guidelines, fact sheets, and other tools; a current awareness update section that contains recent additions to the database; a list of other sources of information about distasters and medicine, and background information on the Resource Guide project. In 2010 the guide became hosted by the National Library of Medicine.

Contact: New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10029, Telephone: (212) 822-7200 Fax: (212) 722-7650 Web Site: http://www.nyam.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disaster planning, Disasters, Online databases, Public health, Resource materials, World WIde Web

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. [2005]. Research-based web design and usability guidelines. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 267 pp.

Annotation: These revised guidelines were developed to help managers, designers, and others involved in creating websites base their decisions on the most current and best available information. The guidelines are particularly relevant to the design of information-oriented sites but can be applied across a wide spectrum of sites. Researchers who investigate web design issues may also find the guidelines useful. The guidelines strive to contribute to the creation of better health and human services websites, provide quantified peer-reviewed website design guidelines, and stimulate research in areas that will influence the creation of useful websites.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-16-076270-7.

Keywords: Design, Graphic design, Guidelines, Health, Information, Information sources, Research, Resource materials, World wide web

Center for the Advancement of Distance Education. 2005. Public health distance learning survey results. Chicago, IL: Center for the Advancement of Distance Education, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report provides results from a survey on distance learning sent to 3, 000 public health professionals, faculty, students, family representatives, and officials. Responses were collected from January 27 through February 11, 2005. Responses to each survey question are presented in tables and figures. A list of topics generated by the open-ended question: "Please enter topics that you would like to see covered by webcasts in the next 12 months" is also presented.

Contact: Center for the Advancement of Distance Education, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor Street, Room 1054 (MC 923), Chicago, IL 60612-4394, Telephone: (312) 996-2233 Fax: (312) 413-2054 E-mail: cade@uic.edu Web Site: http://www.uic.edu/sph/cade Available from the website.

Keywords: Distance education, Internet, Surveys, Training, World Wide Web

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.