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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

New York State Department of Health, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. n.d.. Making it work toolkit. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, multiple items.

Annotation: These toolkits for consumers and employers provide information to address the challenges of low income wage earners returning to work while continuing to breastfeed. Contents include five individual toolkits. A toolkit for mothers provides information on how to talk with supervisors, coworkers, and child care providers and how to store and handle breast milk, as well as checklists, tips, sample schedules, and food ideas. A toolkit for family members explains the role grandparents and partners play while dispelling myths that can be held by others, and how to give support and care for a breastfed infant. Additional toolkits are designed to help employers comply with state and federal laws; offer guidance for mothers and employers on interpreting the laws and resources; and provide sample letters and policies.

Contact: New York State Department of Health, Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237, Telephone: (866) 881-2809 E-mail: dohweb@health.state.ny.us Web Site: http://www.health.ny.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Employer initiatives, Legislation, Low income groups, New York, State programs, Supported employment, Workplace health promotion

Alliance for a Healthier Generation. 2014. Healthy Schools Program framework of best practices. New York, NY: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document describes complementary approaches to helping schools build healthier environments. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment, health education, physical education and other physical activity programs, nutrition services, health promotion staff, and family and community involvement. Through an assessment tool and a customized action plan, the framework is designed to help schools work toward the Alliance for Healthier Generation's National Healthy Schools Award.

Contact: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, c/o The Clinton Foundation, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (888) KID-HLTH E-mail: info@HealthierGeneration.org Web Site: https://www.healthiergeneration.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Model programs, Nutrition services, Parent participation, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Workplace health promotion

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2013. Results from the School Health Policies and Practices Study 2012. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 147 pp.

Annotation: This report provides state- and district-level data on each of the following eight components of the Coordinated School Health (CSH) model: health education, physical education, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services, healthy and safe school environment, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement. Screenings, notifications, and referrals for oral health problems are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community participation, Data sources, Family school relations, Health education, Health services, Mental health, Nutrition services, Physical education, Policy analysis, Prevalence, Prevention programs, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Social services, Trends, Workplace health promotion

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Accelerating Progress in Obesity Prevention. 2012. Accelerating progress in obesity prevention: Solving the weight of the nation. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 462 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on catalysts that could speed progress in obesity prevention. The report identifies five critical areas for change, including (1) environments for physical activity, (2) food and beverage environments, (3) message environments, (4) health care and work environments, and (5) school environments. Recommendations and strategies for their implementation are offered in each of these five areas.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-22154-2.

Keywords: Health care, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, School health, Trends, Workplace health promotion

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2012. Health reform: What is in it to promote breastfeeding?. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet outlines breastfeeding provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and discusses how maternal and child health programs can use the ACA to strengthen breastfeeding efforts for women. Topics include breastfeeding support, counseling, and equipment, as well as reasonable break time and appropriate space in the workplace. Sources and selected resources for further information are provided.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Health care reform, Legislation, State MCH programs, Women, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Campbell KP, ed. 2010–. Investing in maternal and child health: An employer's toolkit (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 304 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit outlines opportunities that employers have to improve the health of children and adolescents (from birth to age 21) and women (preconception, pregnant, and postpartum periods). Topics include health benefit design, beneficiary education and engagement, and health promotion programs. Recommendations related to minimum dental benefits, cost-sharing arrangements; and other information pertinent to plan design and administration are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children, Cost effectiveness, Employee benefits, Infant, Multimedia, Oral health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Women's health, Workplace health promotion

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2010. The Surgeon General's vision for a healthy and fit nation. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides the Surgeon General's recommendations for preventing obesity. The report provides background on obesity and discusses opportunities for prevention for individuals and families, in child care, at schools, in the workplace, and in communities.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Communities, Families, Health, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Schools, Workplace, Workplace health promotion

U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division. 2010. Break time for nursing mothers under the FLSA. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division, 2 pp. (Fact sheet #73)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on the break time requirement in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act for working women who are breastfeeding. Topics include general requirements, time and location of breaks, coverage and compensation, and where to obtain additional information.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (866) 4-USWAGE Secondary Telephone: (866) 487-9243 Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/whd/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Federal legislation, Regulations, Work family issues, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Kraczkowsky K, Reagin A, Sherrets D. 2009. An employer's guide to child and adolescent mental health: Recommendations for the workplace, health plans, and employee assistance programs. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 39 pp.

Annotation: This monograph examines the impact of child and adolescent behavioral health disorders on the workplace by direct and indirect costs, its epidemiology in the U.S., and treatment and cost trends. It also describes the state of child and adolescent behavioral health treatment and makes recommendations to employers on how to better address this challenge with adjustments to their health plan and to their workplace culture.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior disorders, Children, Employee benefits, Health insurance, Mental health, Workplace health promotion, Youth

Every Mother and Rich Winter Design and Multimedia. 2008. Business case for breastfeeding: Steps for creating a breastfeeding friendly worksite. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 resource kit (5 items)

Annotation: This 5-piece resource kit is intended for employers, human resource managers, expectant and new parents, and health professionals interested in encouraging businesses and public agencies to establish, maintain, and expand lactation support programs for their employees. The five components include 1) a business case for breastfeeding; 2) easy steps to supporting breastfeeding employees; 3) a toolkit with resources for building a lactation support program; 4) an employees guide to breastfeeding and working; and 5) an outreach marketing guide. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Business, Costs, Economics, Family support programs, Infant health, Policy development, Women's health, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Lee V, Mikkelsen L, Srikantharajah J, Cohen L. 2008. Promising strategies for creating healthy eating and active living environments. Oakland, CA: Healthy Eating Active Living Convergence Partnership, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a review of policy, strategy, and program recommendations to create healthy eating and active living environments. Topics include (1) how safe neighborhoods, communities, and buildings support physical activity; (2) making fresh, local, and healthy food available; (3) promoting healthy foods and beverages; (4) offering only healthy foods and beverages at school; (5) promoting physical activity at school and before and after school; (6) promoting healthy foods and beverages and physical activity at work, (7) promotion of healthy eating and active living by health professionals and health care organizations; (8) promotion of healthy eating and active living by the government and the private sector; (9) promotion of healthy eating and active living by those who influence the entertainment and information environments; and (10) offering only healthy foods and beverages and promoting physical activity at child care institutions.

Contact: Convergence Partnership, PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: http://www.kintera.org/site/lookup.asp?c=fhLOK6PELmF&b=3930101 Web Site: http://www.convergencepartnership.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Communities, Food consumption, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Programs, Public policy, Schools, Workplace health promotion

Rees C, Finch R. 2004. Health improvement: A comprehensive guide to designing, implementing, and evaluating worksite programs. Washington, DC: Center for Prevention and Health Services, National Business Group on Health, 15 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This guide is for employers interested in health improvement, regardless of whether the company is looking to design a new program altogether or thinking about options to improve or expand existing programs. It provides the following: (1) information on the structure of health improvement programs, (2) the business case for health improvement, (3) examples of best practices, and (4) the means for evaluation. A summary is provided as well as tips and resources for employers. References are also included.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Fiscal management, Models, Program development, Program evaluation, Workplace health promotion

Washington Business Group on Health. 2000. Employers and public health leaders: Sharing accountability to advance maternal and child health. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document is the proceedings of the maternal and child health forum held by the Washington Business Group on Health in 2000. It includes background material, summaries from regional discussion groups on maternal and child health care delivery, and general discussion outcomes. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Employer initiatives, Federal MCH programs, Health care delivery, Local MCH programs, Public health, Workplace health promotion

Washington Business Group on Health. 2000. Promoting healthy pregnancies: Counseling and contraception as the first step. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 8 pp. (Family health in brief; issue no. 3)

Annotation: This issue brief addresses the importance of family planning in women's health care, reasons employers should cover family planning services in their employee health insurance plans, and employer concerns.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Contraception, Corporate programs, Cost effectiveness, Counseling, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Family planning, Health insurance, Infant health promotion, Pregnancy counseling, Women's health promotion, Workplace health promotion

Jacobson M, Kolarek MH, Newton B. 1996. Business, babies, and the bottom line: Corporate innovations and best practices in maternal and child health. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, National Business Partnership to Improve Family Health, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report describes efforts large corporations in the United States have made to improve the health of the mothers who work for them and that of their children. It profiles innovative practices and analyzes the bottom line results of some corporate programs, and it spotlights the major features of other programs. The report also includes a tips for successfully initiating maternal and child health programs in other corporations. It also lists of the corporations profiled and cites useful resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Contact Phone: (202) 408-9320 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Contact E-mail: jacobson@wbgh.com, or kolarek@wbgh.com Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Corporate programs, Cost effectiveness, Infant health, Prenatal care, Workplace health promotion

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1996. PIC briefing book: The business perspective on maternal and child health. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This loose-leaf notebook contains articles, pamphlets, and reports that discuss the corporate world's attitudes, perceptions, and policies on maternal and child health. Topics include the length of stay in hospitals for mothers and infants following birth, breastfeeding in the workplace, women as mothers and parents within the workplace, and school health and school issues. Other topics include health promotion in the workplace, worksite wellness, assuring the quality of health plans, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), and other business issues such as managed care, medical savings accounts, and health purchasing cooperatives. The materials were prepared for the January 1996 meeting of the MCH Partnership for Information and Communication Interorganizational Work Group. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Business, Child health, Employee benefits, Health policy, Hospitalization, Insurance, Length of stay, Managed care, Maternal health, Perinatal care, Policy development, Prenatal care, Quality assurance, Retirement, School health, Workplace health promotion

March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 1993. Healthy babies, healthy business: An employer's guidebook on improving maternal and infant health. White Plains, NY: March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation, 196 pp.

Annotation: This guidebook is designed to help employers understand the business rationale behind preventing unhealthy births, and to design and implement a maternal and infant health strategy that works for companies of varying sizes. The guidebook explains how to assess maternity and infant care costs, and it describes health care and other benefits that support maternal and infant health. It includes worksheets and sample programs from several companies.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Contact Phone: (914) 997-4515 Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com $95.00 plus $4.00 shipping and handling or $110.00 plus $4.00 if order includes companion Infant Health Strategy Worksheets on computer disk.

Keywords: Employee benefits, Infant health, Maternal health, Prenatal care, Workplace health promotion

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Federal Interagency Ad Hoc Committee on Health Promotion Through the Schools. 1992-. Healthy schools: A directory of federal programs and activities related to health promotion through the schools. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, annual.

Annotation: This directory lists 112 federal programs and 35 federally supported clearinghouses and information centers whose activities are relevant to school health. Each entry provides information on the area of emphasis, target groups, program profile, materials, and information contact.

Contact: U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8282 E-mail: odphpinfo@hhs.gov Web Site: https://health.gov Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Alcohol use, Child development, Child nutrition, Children, Clearinghouses, Comprehensive programs, Counseling, Curricula, Driver education, Federal government, Federal programs, Health and safety education, Health promotion, Media campaigns, Nutrition programs, Physical fitness, Resources for professionals, Safety, School based clinics, School counseling, School health, School health programs, School health services, School nursing, Substance abuse, Training, Workplace health promotion

U.S. Department of Labor. 1991. What works: Workplaces without alcohol and other drugs. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Department of Labor, 66 pp. (OSAP prevention library; no. 1)

Annotation: This report for employers describes the problems of substance abuse in the workplace and outlines programs of education, training, testing, and assistance, for prevention and treatment of abuse by employees. Extensive appendices present models of workplace substance abuse policies and employee assistance programs; describe the legal issues surrounding drug testing by employers; and reproduce fact sheets on various types of drugs. A two-page list of resource organizations is also included.

Keywords: Corporate programs, Employee assistance programs, Model programs, Program descriptions, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Workplace health promotion

Behrens R. 1990. Reaching families through worksite and community health promotion programs. Washington, DC: Washington Business Group on Health, 88 pp.

Annotation: This report, discusses why families are important to businesses, barriers to reaching families with effective health promotion programs, successful methods for reaching families, publicizing and evaluating programs, targeting special groups, steps to ensure success, ideas that have and haven't worked, and case examples.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Contact Phone: (202) 408-9320 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Corporate programs, Workplace health promotion

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.