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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (48 total).

National Partnership for Women and Families. 2014. Expecting better: A state-by-state analysis of laws that help new parents (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report documents workers' rights under state laws and the progress that states have made in promoting the economic security of expecting and new parents. It also includes a snapshot of state policies that more broadly assist family caregivers -- both parents and workers overall -- in addressing the needs of their children and other family members.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2600 Fax: (202) 986-2539 E-mail: info@nationalpartnership.org Web Site: http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/PageServer Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Family support, Parental leave, Policy, Policy analysis, Reports, State initiatives, State legislation, Working parents

Kossen J. 2013. Building a secure and healthy start: Family leave in the early years. Washington, DC: Zero To Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the importance of providing family leave for working parents of infants and young children. The report provides statistical information, discusses current family leave policy, provides policy recommendations, and discusses relevant research.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family leave, Infants, Parental leave, Parents, Public policy, Research, Working parents, Young children

Ochshorn S, Skinner C. 2012. Building a competitive future right from the start: How paid leave strengthens 21st century families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 27 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a brief history of paid family leave policy in the United Sates and abroad; synthesizes what is known about paid leave and its impact on family and civic life; and offers a set of recommendations for policymakers, public health and early childhood stakeholders, business leaders, and federal, state, and local education agencies.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Family leave, Infants, Public health, Public policy, Working parents, Young children

Zigler E, Muenchow S, Ruhm CJ. 2012. Time off with baby: Making the case for paid care leave. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 173 pp.

Annotation: This book, which focuses on the importance of paid parental leave after the birth of an infant, weighs the implications of existing research on child health and development along with what is known about the economic impact of parental leave policies as they have evolved in other nations and in the United States. The book defines various types of leave—maternity, paternity, parental, family, and newborn care. It discusses who receives parental leave and why or why not, who benefits from unpaid job protection under the Family and Medical Leave Act, and to what extent private firms are providing these types of leave for the care of infants or newly adopted children. Other practical issues, policy options, and financing mechanisms are also discussed.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $34.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 9781934019979.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoption, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Economic factors, Families, Family leave, Fathers, Financing, Infants, Legislation, Mothers, Parental leave, Parents, Public policy, Working parents

Baker M, Milligan KS. 2011. Maternity leave and children's cognitive and behavioral development. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 50 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17105)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of an expansion of Canada's paid maternity leave programs (expanding the duration of job-protected, partially compensated maternity/parental leave from approximately 6 months to a full year) on measures of children's cognitive and behavioral development at ages 4 and 5. The paper discusses previous literature on the topic, the reform and its expected impact, data, the empirical framework, differences in observable inputs across birth cohorts at ages 1 through 4, and estimates of the impact of the change on developmental outcomes at ages 4 and 5.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavioral development, Canada, Child development, Cognitive development, Costs, International health, Legislation, Parental leave, Public policy, Research, Working parents

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2011. Work and family. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 3 items. (The future of children; v. 21, no. 2, Fall 2011)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children examines a variety of work-family conflicts and assess their effects both on the well-being of American employees and their families and on the productivity of American employers. The authors also suggest approaches to help working parents meet the challenges of work-family conflict. The issue includes articles on the following topics: work and families; changing families, changing workplaces; policies to assist parents with young children; families with school-age children; children with health problems; families and elder care in the twenty-first century; workplace flexibility; the government's role in work-family conflict; and international perspectives on work-family policies.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-7-3.

Keywords: Children with special heath care needs, Employment, Families, Government role, Older adults, Public policy, School age children, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

Kenney G, Cook A, Pelletier J. 2009. Prospects for reducing uninsured rates among children: How much can premium assistance programs help?. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 7 pp. (Timely analysis of immediate health policy issues)

Annotation: This report addresses the question of the extent to which uninsured children could be covered under employer-sponsored insurance through premium-assistance programs, which use public funding under Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program to subsidize employer-sponsored insurance. The report provides background and discusses the data and methods, results, and policy implications.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Eligibility, Financing, Health insurance programs, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Uninsured persons, Working parents

Fass S. 2009. Paid leave in the states: A crticial support for low-wage workers and their families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines existing state paid-leave policies, which some states have enacted in the absence of a federal policy. The brief discusses research on the benefits of family leave and describes the federal Family and Medical Leave Act. It then examines the strengths and limitations of existing state-level policies, with a focus on California, which in 2002 became the first state to enact paid family leave. The brief concludes with recommendations for state policymakers considering paid family leave, with an emphasis on how these policies could be crafted to best serve the needs of low-wage workers and their families.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Public policy, California, Families, Family leave, Federal programs, Legislation, Low income groups, Research, State programs, Working parents

Zedlewski SR, Chaudry A, Simms M. 2008. A new safety net for low-income families. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper synthesizes an integrated set of policy proposals designed to help low-income working parents receive training so that they can advance to better-paying jobs and receive other services to help them get a secure foothold in the labor market and find and keep employment. The paper covers the following topics: (1) low-income working families are at risk, (2) employment-based and government supports don't do enough, (3) how could policies change to help low-income families succeed?, and (4) what would it take to implement new policies?

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family support services, High risk groups, Low income groups, Parent support services, Poverty, Professional training, Public policy, Training, Working parents

Ross DC, Horn A, Rudowitz R, Marks C. 2008. Determining income eligibility in children's health coverage programs: How states use disregards in children's Medicaid and SCHIP. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 12 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief describes the purpose of income disregards (which refer to both income that is excluded and expenses that are deducted from a family's earnings) as they relate to Medicaid and State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) eligibility, how disregards help enable children in working families to obtain health coverage, the types and amounts of disregards currently used in Medicaid and SCHIP, and the implications of prohibiting the application of disregards in determining eligibility for children' health coverage programs. The brief also discusses how states determine income eligibility, how disregards are used, specific disregards, and the implications of eliminating disregards.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Eligibility, Families, Health insurance, Income factors, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, State Children's Health Insurance Program, State programs, Uninsured persons, Working parents

Wertheimer R, Moore KA, Burkhauser M. 2008. The well-being of children in working poor and other families: 1997 and 2004. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 8 pp. (Research brief 2008-33)

Annotation: This brief focuses on child well-being in the wake of welfare reform legislation implemented in 1996. The brief looks at outcomes including (1) measures of how well a child is developing, (2) measures of how well a child will develop, and (3) measures of interaction within the community. The authors sought to determine whether increased employment among poor families led to deteriorating child outcomes. Topics include changes in child well-being between 1997 and 2004 and differences in well-being between children in working poor families and those in non-working-poor families in 2004.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Communities, Families, Income factors, Legislation, Low income groups, Trends, Welfare reform, Working parents

Ray R, Gornick JC, Schmitt J. 2008. Parental leave policies in 21 countries: Assessing generosity and gender equality. Washington, DC: Center for Economic Policy and Research, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the major national policies of 21 high-income economies as of June 2008. The report focuses on two aspects of parental leave policies: (1) the level of support provided to parents and (2) the degree to which leave policies promote an egalitarian distribution between mothers and fathers of the time devoted to child care. The report concludes with best practices culled from the 21 national experiences.

Contact: Center for Economic and Policy Research, 1611 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 293-5380 E-mail: cepr@cepr.net Web Site: http://www.cepr.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Families, Family leave, Fathers, International programs, Model programs, Mothers, Parental leave, Public policy, Working parents

Elkind D. 2007. The hurried child: Growing up too fast too soon. (25 anv. ed.). Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 255 pp.

Annotation: This book examines the trend of rushing children along in their development, exposing them to influences not appropriate for their ages. In part one, the roles and behaviors of parents, schools, and the media are discussed, in addition to other influences such as the Internet and research findings on the brain. Part two explores the "hurrying" phenomenon and stress in children and includes topics such as growing up slowly, social development, how children react to stress, and how best to help the hurried child. A section of endnotes and an index conclude this book.

Contact: Perseus Publishing, 11 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, Telephone: (617) 252-5298 Secondary Telephone: (800) 255-1514 Fax: (800) 324-3791 Web Site: http://www.perseuspublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7382-0441-2.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Child mental health, Parent child relations, Parenting attitudes, Psychosocial development, School age children, Single parents, Stress, Working parents

Schulman K, Blank H. 2007. Close to home: State strategies to strengthen and support family, friend, and neighbor care. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses some policy decisions that states make or could make to support family, friend, and neighbor (FFN) care of children whose parents are working. Such policy decisions include (1) determining which providers are exempt from state licensing or regulation, (2) setting standards for FFN providers receiving public funds, (3) establishing policies for child care assistance programs that help parents pay for FFN care, including provider reimbursement rates and parent co-payments; (4) supporting initiatives to improve the quality of child care, including FFN care, (5) allowing FFN providers to participate in the Child and Adult Care Food Program, (6) facilitating coordination of state prekindergarten initiatives with FFN care, (7) assisting FFN providers caring for children with disabilities and other special needs, (8) making home visiting and family support programs available to FFN providers, and (9) permitting unionization of FFN providers. The report discusses the policy options states have in each of the areas, how these policies can affect families using FFN care as well as FFN providers, and examples of promising approaches states have taken.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children with special health care needs, Families, Family support programs, Financing, Home visiting, Licensing, Low income groups, Public policy, State programs, Working parents

Golden O, Winston P, Acs G, Chaudry A. 2007. Framework for a new safety net for low-income working families. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 52 pp. (Low-income working families paper 7)

Annotation: This paper offers a framework for thinking about the complex array of public programs and private benefits that can help low-income working families chart a course toward steady work, economic security, and healthy development for their children. Contents include a description of how low-income families get by in today's economy and goals enabling parents to meet their families' needs through earnings form low-wage jobs, weathering gaps in employment, supporting parents' advancement to better-paying jobs, and improving children's well-being and development consistent with parents' employment. Potential goals include ensuring health coverage for low-income families, providing parents paid leave at the birth of a child, investing in children through child care subsidies and quality initiatives, improving security for low-wage workers, and extending housing supports to low-income working families. The final section contains strengths and limits of this framework as a basis for action, using the framework to inform action, and next steps. Appendix tables, notes, and references are provided.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Children, Families, Family support services, Health insurance, Low income groups, Parent support services, Poverty, Work family issues, Working parents

Baker M, Milligan KS. 2007. Maternal employment, breastfeeding, and health: Evidence from maternity leave mandates. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 46 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 13188)

Annotation: This paper focuses on the efficacy of maternity leave mandates that could help achieve the goals of increasing the incidence and duration of breastfeeding. In particular, the paper looks at maternity leave mandates in Canada. The paper, which includes an abstract, is divided into the following main sections: (1) introduction, (2) previous research on breastfeeding, (3) policy environment, (4) predicted effects, (5) data, (6) empirical approach, (7) results, and (8) conclusions. References are included. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures grouped together at the end of the report.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Canada, Parental leave, Public policy, Research, Working parents

Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy. 2007. Employee benefits study for CSHCN: [Final report]. [Boston, MA]: Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a 2001-2006 study to examine employer-sponsored benefits systems and workplace supports as they relate to employees who have children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Topics include how such benefits were structured, how employers ad purchasers understand the employees' needs for their CSHCN, opportunities for improvements in workplace supports, and how Title V programs can engage employers to improve services to CSHCN. The report contains an executive summary, a description of project goals and objectives, key findings, project implementation, and sustainability and replication. Additional information is provided on products developed during the project and a summary of recommendations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Final reports, Health care financing, Parent support services, Work family issues, Working parents

Capizzano J, Adams G, Ost J. 2006. Caring for children of color: The child care patterns of white, black, and Hispanic children under 5. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 41 pp. (Occasional paper no. 72)

Annotation: This paper investigates child care patterns uncovered in past research to determine whether they hold for white, black, and Hispanic children separately or if these subgroups exhibit patterns that differ from the patterns for children nationally. The paper looks at different economic, work, and family situations. The paper, which includes an executive summary, discusses (1) the data and methods used, (2) demographic and socioeconomic differences among white, black, and Hispanic families; (3) child care patterns in families where both parents work, (4) patterns by age of the child, (5) patterns by family structure, (6) patterns by family income, (7) patterns by primary caregiver's education level, (8) patterns by parental availability, (9) patterns by primary caregiver's work schedule, (10) patterns by presence of nonparental relatives in the household, and (11) patterns by region. A summary and policy implications are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Child care, Economic factors, Families, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Public policy, Racial factors, Research, Whites, Working parents, Young children

Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program and Population Reference Bureau. 2006. Kids in the City: Indicators of child well-being in large cities from the 2004 American Community Survey. Washington, DC: Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution, 11 pp. (Survey series)

Annotation: This report provides information about levels of child poverty in the 50 largest cities in the United States, and the factors underlying those rates. The intent of the report is to document the variations in child poverty rates in different cities and the contextual factors associated with outcomes for children and families in different parts of the country. The report also seeks to demonstrate the usefulness of the Census Bureau's American Community Survey for monitoring child well-being in cities and elsewhere. The report, which begins with a summary of findings, discusses the methodology used, presents findings, and offers a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. Endnotes are included.

Contact: Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu/metro.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Ethnic factors, Families, Poverty, Racial factors, Single parents, Surveys, Trends, Urban populations, Working parents

National Center for Children in Poverty. 2005. Why social security matters to children and families: What every policymaker should know. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the way Social Security provides insurance protection for the families of working parents in cases of serious disability or death. The report explains what Social Security is, how the program affects children and families, what are the program's effects on child poverty, and what is at stake for children and families in the current social security debate. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. Endnotes are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Death, Disabilities, Families, Parents, Poverty, Public policy, Social Security, Working parents

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.