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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (57 total).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2014-. Supporting nursing moms at work: Employer solutions. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health,

Annotation: This resource provides businesses with cost-effective tips and solutions for any industry setting to support women who are breastfeeding. Users can search by industry or by solutions to find creative options for space and time, as well as options for supporting women in large companies and small businesses. Topics include room amenities, breast pumps, options for handling expressed milk, education and professional support, promoting services to employees, and privacy. Videos are included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Business, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Multimedia, Parent support programs, Policy development, Working mothers

Mocan N, Raschke C, Unel B. 2013. The impact of mothers' earnings on health inputs and infant health. National Bureau of Economic Research, 54 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19434)

Annotation: This paper investigates the impact of mothers’ earnings on birth weight and gestational age of infants. It also analyzes the impact of earnings on mothers’ consumption of prenatal medical care, and their propensity to smoke and drink during pregnancy. Study methodology and findings are described.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Smoking during pregnancy, Socioeconomic factors, Working mothers

Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington. [2012]. My guide to working and breastfeeding: Tips on how to make working and breastfeeding work for you. [Seattle, WA]: Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brochure, which is geared toward working mothers who are breastfeeding, provides information about how to successfully breastfeed while working outside the home. The brochure discusses why it is important to continue breastfeeding after returning to work, introducing a bottle, choosing child care, rights of breastfeeding women, pumping and storing breastmilk at work, creating a back-to-work plan, and overcoming challenges. The brochure is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington, 155 North East 100th Street, #500, Seattle, WA 98125, Telephone: (206) 281-8032 Fax: (206) 270-8891 E-mail: rachels@wihtinreachwa.org Web Site: http://www.breastfeedingwa.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Bottle feeding, Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Child care, Consumer education materials, Infant health, Parent child relations, Parent rights, Spanish language materials, Women's rights, Working mothers

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2012. Health reform: What is in it to promote breastfeeding?. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet outlines breastfeeding provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and discusses how maternal and child health programs can use the ACA to strengthen breastfeeding efforts for women. Topics include breastfeeding support, counseling, and equipment, as well as reasonable break time and appropriate space in the workplace. Sources and selected resources for further information are provided.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Health care reform, Legislation, State MCH programs, Women, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Zigler E, Muenchow S, Ruhm CJ. 2012. Time off with baby: Making the case for paid care leave. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 173 pp.

Annotation: This book, which focuses on the importance of paid parental leave after the birth of an infant, weighs the implications of existing research on child health and development along with what is known about the economic impact of parental leave policies as they have evolved in other nations and in the United States. The book defines various types of leave—maternity, paternity, parental, family, and newborn care. It discusses who receives parental leave and why or why not, who benefits from unpaid job protection under the Family and Medical Leave Act, and to what extent private firms are providing these types of leave for the care of infants or newly adopted children. Other practical issues, policy options, and financing mechanisms are also discussed.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $34.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 9781934019979.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoption, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Economic factors, Families, Family leave, Fathers, Financing, Infants, Legislation, Mothers, Parental leave, Parents, Public policy, Working parents

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2011. Breastfeeding your baby. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 12 pp. (Labor, delivery, and postpartum care)

Annotation: This pamphlet, which is intended for consumers, explains the benefits of breastfeeding, facts about breastfeeding; how to breastfeed; tips on diet, birth control, and returning to work; and how to keep breasts healthy . Illustrations depicting breastfeeding positions and instructions on how to store breastmilk are included. The pamphlet also contains a glossary of terms. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org $24.95 in packets of 50, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Consumer education materials, Infant health, Nutrition, Spanish language materials, Women's health, Working mothers

Chatterji P, Makowitz S, Brooks-Gunn J. 2011. Early maternal employment and family wellbeing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 48 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17212)

Annotation: This study examines the effects of maternal employment on family well-being, measured by maternal mental and overall health, parenting stress, and parenting quality. Using longitudinal data from the Study on Early Child Care (SECC) conducted by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the authors first estimate the effects of maternal employment on family outcomes when children are 6 months old and then use dynamic panel data models to examine the effects of maternal employment on family outcomes during the first 4.5 years of children’s lives. Detailed findings are presented in table format.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Child health, Employment, Family health, Longitudinal studies, Mental health, Parenting, Research, Working mothers, Young children

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2011. Work and family. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 3 items. (The future of children; v. 21, no. 2, Fall 2011)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children examines a variety of work-family conflicts and assess their effects both on the well-being of American employees and their families and on the productivity of American employers. The authors also suggest approaches to help working parents meet the challenges of work-family conflict. The issue includes articles on the following topics: work and families; changing families, changing workplaces; policies to assist parents with young children; families with school-age children; children with health problems; families and elder care in the twenty-first century; workplace flexibility; the government's role in work-family conflict; and international perspectives on work-family policies.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-7-3.

Keywords: Children with special heath care needs, Employment, Families, Government role, Older adults, Public policy, School age children, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

NIHCM Foundation. 2011. The business case for breastfeeding: Strategies for health plans. [Washington, DC]: NIHCM Foundation, 9 files.

Annotation: This webinar, held on October 25, 2011, explored ways health plans and businesses can promote breastfeeding. Topics included supporting breastfeeding benefits for everyone, breastfeeding for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit, and promising practices at work. Archived content includes the webinar agenda, speaker biographies and presentations, evaluation, and additional resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Lactation, Multimedia, Work family issues, Working mothers

Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington. [2010]. Working and breastfeeding..."It's worth it!". [Seattle, WA]: WithinReach, Breastfeeding Coalition of Washington,

Annotation: This Web site provides information sheets about the importance and benefits of breastfeeding for both mothers and employers. Materials are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: WithinReach , 155 North East 100th Street, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98125, Telephone: (800) 322-2588 Secondary Telephone: (206) 284-2465 Fax: (206) 270-8891 E-mail: info@withinreachwa.org Web Site: http://withinreachwa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Consumer education materials, Employer initiatives, Spanish language materials, Working mothers

U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division. 2010. Break time for nursing mothers under the FLSA. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division, 2 pp. (Fact sheet #73)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on the break time requirement in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act for working women who are breastfeeding. Topics include general requirements, time and location of breaks, coverage and compensation, and where to obtain additional information.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (866) 4-USWAGE Secondary Telephone: (866) 487-9243 Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/whd/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Federal legislation, Regulations, Work family issues, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Davis CS, Dhillon J. 2010. The ACA and nursing mothers. [Washington, DC]: National Health Law Program, 7 pp. (Short paper no. 4)

Annotation: This paper describes provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) intended to make it easier for women with children under the age of one who participate in the labor force to continue breastfeeding and providing breast milk to their children. The paper provides background information on the benefits of breastfeeding and discusses the disparities that exist in breastfeeding based on maternal education, age, race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. It describes Section 4207 of the ACA that requires employers to provide a reasonable amount of time and a place where breastfeeding mothers can express milk. The paper also explains how the new provisions differ from the previous law.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Federal legislation, Health care reform, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Working mothers

United States Breastfeeding Committee. 2010. Workplace accommodations to support and protect breastfeeding. Washington, DC: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 20 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a background for understanding the role of lactation breaks in the workplace as a critical way to improve the health and productivity of working women and their children, in compliance with Section 4207 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Section topics include the public health case; how lactation breaks support the physical process of maintaining milk supply; lactation breaks in the context of other work-family and workplace wellness issues and explores the business case for breastfeeding; U.S. laws about breastfeeding and the workplace; and looks ahead to unfinished business. The appendix offers a quick look at the history of infant feeding and women’s work, in order to provide context for decision-makers in government and business.

Contact: United States Breastfeeding Committee, 2025 M Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 367-1132 Fax: (202) 367-2132 E-mail: office@usbreastfeeding.org Web Site: http://www.usbreastfeeding.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Infant health, Infant nutrition, Maternal health, Working mothers

Han W, Ruhm C, Waldfogel J, Washbrook E. 2009. Public policies and women's employment after childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 45 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14660)

Annotation: This paper examines how the public policy environment in the United States affects work by new mothers following childbirth. The authors examine four types of policies that vary across states and affect the budget constraints in different ways. Specifically, the authors examine how state parental leave laws, child care subsidies, cash welfare and food stamp benefit generosity, and welfare work requirements for mothers of infants affect the employment patterns of mothers of newborns and young children.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Food stamp program, Parental leave, Public policy, Welfare services, Working mothers

Slavit WI ed. 2009. Investing in workplace breastfeeding programs and policies: An employer's toolkit [rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 71 pp.

Annotation: This eight-section kit is intended for employers, human resource managers, expectant and new parents, and health professionals interested in encouraging business and public agencies to establish, maintain, and expand lactation-support programs for their employees. The kit is divided into the following sections: (1) the business case for breastfeeding promotion, (2) workplace breastfeeding options, (3) breastfeeding promotion program components (4) employer case studies, (5) getting started, (6) methods of measuring success, (7) other ways to support breastfeeding women, and (8) tools for employers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Working mothers

Johnson TD. 2008. Maternity leave and employment patterns of first-time mothers: 1961-2003. Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau, 19 pp. (Current population reports, P70-113)

Annotation: This report examines trends in maternity leave and the employment patterns of women who gave birth to their first child between January 1961 and December 2003. The first section of the report analyzes trends in women's work experience prior to the birth of their first child and the factors associated with employment during pregnancy. Changes are placed in the historical context of the enactment of family-related legislation during the last quarter of the 20th century. The second section identifies the maternity leave arrangements used by women before and after the birth of their first child and the shifts that have occured in the mix of leave arrangements that are used. The third section discusses how rapidly mothers return to work after the birth of their first child and the factors related to the length of time they are absent from the labor force.

Contact: U.S. Census Bureau, 4600 Silver Hill Road, Washington, DC 20233, Telephone: (301) 763-4748 E-mail: webmaster@census.gov Web Site: http://www.census.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Employment, Family leave, Legislation, Mothers, Pregnancy, Statistical data, Trends, Working mothers

Every Mother and Rich Winter Design and Multimedia. 2008. Business case for breastfeeding: Steps for creating a breastfeeding friendly worksite. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 resource kit (5 items)

Annotation: This 5-piece resource kit is intended for employers, human resource managers, expectant and new parents, and health professionals interested in encouraging businesses and public agencies to establish, maintain, and expand lactation support programs for their employees. The five components include 1) a business case for breastfeeding; 2) easy steps to supporting breastfeeding employees; 3) a toolkit with resources for building a lactation support program; 4) an employees guide to breastfeeding and working; and 5) an outreach marketing guide. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Business, Costs, Economics, Family support programs, Infant health, Policy development, Women's health, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Ray R, Gornick JC, Schmitt J. 2008. Parental leave policies in 21 countries: Assessing generosity and gender equality. Washington, DC: Center for Economic Policy and Research, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the major national policies of 21 high-income economies as of June 2008. The report focuses on two aspects of parental leave policies: (1) the level of support provided to parents and (2) the degree to which leave policies promote an egalitarian distribution between mothers and fathers of the time devoted to child care. The report concludes with best practices culled from the 21 national experiences.

Contact: Center for Economic and Policy Research, 1611 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 293-5380 E-mail: cepr@cepr.net Web Site: http://www.cepr.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Families, Family leave, Fathers, International programs, Model programs, Mothers, Parental leave, Public policy, Working parents

Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, Life Course Initiative. 2008. A 12-point plan to close the black-white gap in birth outcomes. [Martinez, CA]: Contra Costa Health Services, Family, Maternal and Child Health Programs, Life Course Initiative, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about a plan that aims to improve health care services for at-risk populations, strengthen families and communities, and address social and economic inequities over the life course. The fact sheet discusses how the plan addresses these three topics.

Contact: Contra Costa Health Services, 50 Douglas Drive, Martinez, CA 94553, Telephone: (925) 957-5403 Fax: (925) 957-5409 Web Site: http://www.cchealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Communities, Education, Ethnic factors, Families, Fathers, Low income groups, Prenatal care, Racial factors, Service coordination, Working mothers

Mason G, Roholt S, eds. 2006. Promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding: A North Carolina blueprint for action. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Division of Public Health, Nutrition Services Branch, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This blueprint, which provides information on the importance of breastfeeding for both mothers and infants, incorporates input from a broad spectrum of community, state, and national stakeholders and experts and is intended to serve as a guide for North Carolina communities, health care systems, professional societies, academic and training programs, workplaces, and child care facilities to support, promote, and protect breastfeeding. The document discusses benefits to and barriers of breastfeeding, provides recommendations, and discusses ways to translate recommendations into action.

Contact: North Carolina Division of Public Health, Nutrition Services Branch, 1914 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-1914, Telephone: (919) 707-5799 Fax: (919) 870-4818 Web Site: http://www.nutritionnc.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Child health, Infant health, Mothers, North Carolina, State initiatives, Women's health, Working mothers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.