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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

Findlay S. 2016. Paid family and medical leave. Bethesda, MD: Health Affairs, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines issues related to paid family or medical leave including laws governing employee benefits. Contents include characteristics of paid family and medical leave laws in California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. Topics include maximum and minimum length of paid leave, employee eligibility, benefit amount, waiting period, and funding mechanism. Opportunities to finance paid family and medical leave for all working people in the United States are also discussed. Links to related resources are provided.

Contact: Health Affairs, Project HOPE: The People-to-People Foundation, 7500 Old Georgetown Road, Suite 600, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 656-7401 Fax: (301) 654-2854 Web Site: http://www.healthaffairs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Employee benefits, Family leave, Financing, Legislation, Work family issues

Tower CC. 2014. Understanding child abuse and neglect. (9th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 442 pp.

Annotation: This textbook covers a range of topics associated with child abuse and neglect. It provides an overview on the problem, considers the rights and responsibilities of parents and children, and reviews the effects of abuse and neglect on the development of children. Individual chapters cover physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, and neglect. Other chapters examine ways to prevent or intervene in abusive situations through the judicial system and consider treatment methodologies including the use of foster care. The book also includes a chapter on adults who were abused as children but who had not reported the fact.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Children's rights, Emotional abuse, Families, Family characteristics, Foster care, Incest, Intervention, Legal issues, Parent rights, Parenting, Physical abuse, Prevention, Sexual abuse, Social work

My Brother's Keeper Task Force. 2014. My Brother's Keeper Task Force report to the president. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report describes progress on a national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. The report outlines the building blocks for success across key life stages and presents initial recommendations and areas of opportunity for each of the key milestones. The focus areas include entering school ready to learn, reading at grade level by third grade, graduating from high school ready for college and career, completing postsecondary education or training, entering the work force, reducing violence, and providing a second chance. Cross-cutting areas of opportunity that span all focus areas are also discussed.

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent males, Barriers, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Graduation, Juvenile justice, Learning, Life course, Men, Minority groups, Reading, School to work transition, Social factors, Violence prevention, Work family issues, Work force, Young adults

National Partnership for Women and Families. 2014. Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA): Questions and answers (7th ed.). Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, 36 pp.

Annotation: This guide explains the provisions of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and how the FMLA protects jobs and health insurance. Requirements, remediation, and other leave laws and protections are discussed. The guide is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2600 Fax: (202) 986-2539 E-mail: info@nationalpartnership.org Web Site: http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/PageServer Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Employee benefits, Family leave, Legislation, Paternal leave, Public policy, Spanish language materials, Work family issues

Smith K, Schaefer A. 2012. Who cares for the sick kids?: Parents' access to paid time to care for a sick child. Durham, NC: Carsey Institute, 5 pp. (Issue brief no. 51)

Annotation: This brief analyzes employed parents’ access to five or more paid sick days annually to care for a sick child. Using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce collected by the Families and Work Institute, the authors analyze differences in access between employed mothers and fathers by demographic and work-related characteristics. They report on the percentage of employed parents lacking access to paid sick days for care of children; the differences in reported work satisfaction based on the availability of leave; and the differences in the amount of work mothers and fathers report missing to care for a sick child. Figures and tables show who is responsible for the sick child among married employees the percentage of employed parents who lack access to different kinds of care; and the percentage of workers lacking access to leave based on select characteristics such as education, income level.

Contact: Carsey Institute, University of New Hampshire, 73 Main Street, Huddleston Hall G05B, Durham, NH 03824, Telephone: (603) 862-2821 Fax: (603) 862-3878 Web Site: http://www.carseyinstitute.unh.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Employee benefits, Family leave, National surveys, Statistics, Work family issues

NIHCM Foundation. 2011. The business case for breastfeeding: Strategies for health plans. [Washington, DC]: NIHCM Foundation, 9 files.

Annotation: This webinar, held on October 25, 2011, explored ways health plans and businesses can promote breastfeeding. Topics included supporting breastfeeding benefits for everyone, breastfeeding for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit, and promising practices at work. Archived content includes the webinar agenda, speaker biographies and presentations, evaluation, and additional resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Breastfeeding promotion, Lactation, Multimedia, Work family issues, Working mothers

U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division. 2010. Break time for nursing mothers under the FLSA. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division, 2 pp. (Fact sheet #73)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on the break time requirement in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act for working women who are breastfeeding. Topics include general requirements, time and location of breaks, coverage and compensation, and where to obtain additional information.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (866) 4-USWAGE Secondary Telephone: (866) 487-9243 Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/whd/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding promotion, Federal legislation, Regulations, Work family issues, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Trahan L, Phillips K. 2009. Investing in maternal and child health: Strategies for state employers. Washington, DC: National Business Group on Health, 43 pp.

Annotation: This presentation discusses the business case for investing in maternal, child, and adolescent health (MCAH) and describes a model for improving MCAH through employer-sponsored benefits and health promotion programs. Contents include a description of a resource guide on MCAH plan design, education, and communication and related resources.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Child heath, Employer initiatives, Maternal health, Models, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, State programs, Work family issues

Golden O, Winston P, Acs G, Chaudry A. 2007. Framework for a new safety net for low-income working families. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 52 pp. (Low-income working families paper 7)

Annotation: This paper offers a framework for thinking about the complex array of public programs and private benefits that can help low-income working families chart a course toward steady work, economic security, and healthy development for their children. Contents include a description of how low-income families get by in today's economy and goals enabling parents to meet their families' needs through earnings form low-wage jobs, weathering gaps in employment, supporting parents' advancement to better-paying jobs, and improving children's well-being and development consistent with parents' employment. Potential goals include ensuring health coverage for low-income families, providing parents paid leave at the birth of a child, investing in children through child care subsidies and quality initiatives, improving security for low-wage workers, and extending housing supports to low-income working families. The final section contains strengths and limits of this framework as a basis for action, using the framework to inform action, and next steps. Appendix tables, notes, and references are provided.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Children, Families, Family support services, Health insurance, Low income groups, Parent support services, Poverty, Work family issues, Working parents

Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy. 2007. Employee benefits study for CSHCN: [Final report]. [Boston, MA]: Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a 2001-2006 study to examine employer-sponsored benefits systems and workplace supports as they relate to employees who have children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Topics include how such benefits were structured, how employers ad purchasers understand the employees' needs for their CSHCN, opportunities for improvements in workplace supports, and how Title V programs can engage employers to improve services to CSHCN. The report contains an executive summary, a description of project goals and objectives, key findings, project implementation, and sustainability and replication. Additional information is provided on products developed during the project and a summary of recommendations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Final reports, Health care financing, Parent support services, Work family issues, Working parents

Kimbro R. 2005. On-the-job moms: Work and breastfeeding duration. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 4 pp. (Fragile families research brief; no. 31)

Annotation: This brief examines two questions regarding the relationship between maternal employment and breastfeeding: (1) whether a mother's plans to return to work after a birth affect her decision to breastfeed her child, and (2) whether returning to work shortens the duration of breastfeeding, and if so, by how much. Contents include an introductory background, data and methods, results, conclusion and policy implications.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Employment, Surveys, Work family issues, Working mothers

Jacknowitz A. 2005. An investigation of the factors influencing breastfeeding patterns. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 115 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes a dissertation on breastfeeding rates, policies, and disparities. Topics include changing demographics, welfare work requirements and child well-being: evidence from the effects on breastfeeding, and the role of workplace characteristics in breastfeeding practices. Numerous tables throughout the document offer statistics on research data and methodology. References are also provided.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Cultural factors, Educational factors, Ethnic factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Trends, Welfare reform, Work family issues, Working mothers

Ruhm CJ. 2004. How well do parents with young children combine work and family life?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 23 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 10247)

Annotation: This report examines trends in labor force involvement, household structure, and some activities that may complicate the efforts of parents with young children to balance work and family life. It considers whether employer policies mitigate or exacerbate these difficulties and provides comparisons between U.S. policies and those of other industrialized countries, and it speculates on some possible sources and effects of the differences. Additional topics include changes in labor supply, time investments, employer benefits, family leave policies, maternal employment and child care. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures grouped together at the end of the report. The report also includes a reference list.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child care, Employer benefits, Employer initiatives, Families, Family economics, Family leave, Family support, Work family issues, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

Wyn R, Ojeda V, Ranji U, Salganicoff A. 2003. Women, work, and family health: A balancing act. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation, 4 pp. (Issue brief: An update on women's health policy)

Annotation: This issue brief examines women's roles in family health care decision-making and coordination, the effect of that involvement for women who work, and women's caregiving responsibilities. This analysis is based on data from the 2001 Kaiser Women's Health Survey, a nationally representative sample of nearly 4, 000 women between the ages of 18 and 64. Topics include women's roles in coordinating care for their children and families, balancing work and family health responsibilities, characteristics and health concerns of female caregivers, and barriers to access to care. Statistical data are provided in eight figures throughout the brief.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Family health, Health status, Statistics, Surveys, Women's studies, Work family issues, Working women

Gershoff E. 2003. Low income and hardship among America's kindergartners. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 7 pp. (Living at the edge, research brief no. 3)

Annotation: This report describes the degree and nature of hardship among low-income working and non-working families in a nationally representative sample of children attending kindergarten, the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (Kindergarten Cohort). Section topics include background information on the series, defining hardship, child experiences of hardship, parent work status and child hardship, and policy implications. Statistics are presented in table and narrative format throughout and endnotes complete the brief.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Low income groups, Oral health, Poverty, Research, Statistics, Surveys, Work family issues, Working parents, Young children

Stahl D, O'Donnell NS, Sprague P, Lopez M. 2003. Sparking connections: Community-based strategies for helping family, friend, and neighbor caregivers meet the needs of employees, their children and employers. New York, NY: Families and Work Institute, 46 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses Sparking Connections, an initiative focused on informal child care that is provided by family, friends, and neighbors while parents are at work. The report focuses on interviews with national, state and local experts in disciplines related to early learning, health, family support, and community development. Retail managers; retail employees with young children; and their family, friend, and neighbor caregivers were also interviewed. The report includes interview highlights, a description of model initiatives in child care, a discussion of what retailers, policymakers, and funders can do, and a conclusion. Three appendices include information on making connections in the community, ideas about what community partners can do, and a list of contributing experts. The report includes endnotes.

Contact: Families and Work Institute, 267 Fifth Avenue, Floor 2, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 465-2044 Fax: (212) 465-8637 Web Site: http://www.familiesandwork.org Document Number: ISBN 1-888324-39-2.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Children, Community programs, Families, Family support, Initiatives, Model programs, Work family issues, Working parents

Galinsky E. 1999. Ask the children: What America's children really think about working parents. New York, NY: William Morrow and Company, 391 pp.

Annotation: This book reports findings of a study on what parents and children think about work and family life. The study consisted of a phone interview with a nationally representative sample of employed parents with children, and a self-administered questionnaire given to a nationally representative sample of children in grades three through twelve in the classroom. Topics include quality versus quantity time, how work affects parents and family life, what children are learning, spillover between work and family life, navigating between the two, and what children want to tell working parents.

Contact: William Morrow and Company, 10 East 53rd Street, New York, NY 10022, Telephone: 212-207-7000 Web Site: http://www.harpercollins.com/imprints/index.aspx?imprintid=518003 Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-688-14752-6.

Keywords: Children, Parent child relations, Work family issues, Working mothers, Working parents

Shore R. 1998. Ahead of the curve: Why America's leading employers are addressing the needs of new and expectant parents. New York, NY: Families and Work Institute, 86 pp., exec. summ. (20 pp.).

Annotation: This report discusses three work-family issues: employed parents with children under the age of six, employed parents with young children reporting significant work-family conflict, and children's brain development. Two major studies form the basis of the report. The first is a nationally representative study of employees and a nationally representative study of employers with 100 or more employees. These two studies document the new realities faced by employed mothers and fathers and how the business community has responded. Finally, this report incorporates numerous case studies. It describes what some of America's leading companies of every size are doing to stay ahead of the curve in the arena of families and work.

Contact: Families and Work Institute, 267 Fifth Avenue, Floor 2, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 465-2044 Fax: (212) 465-8637 Web Site: http://www.familiesandwork.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-888324-25-2.

Keywords: Business, Case studies, Child development, Personnel, Reports, Work family issues, Working parents, Young children

Galinsky E, Bond JT. 1998. The 1998 business work-life study: A sourcebook. New York, NY: Families and Work Institute, 84 pp.

Annotation: This survey reports on company-provided work-life assistance programs for employees. Topics discussed include flexible work arrangements such as hours or work at home, leave policies, child and/or elder care assistance, employee assistance programs for family issues, supportiveness of supervisors and workplace culture, company efforts to develop supportive supervisors, health of employees and their families, benefits to enhance economic security, and company involvement in community life. Numerous tables of statistics are provided.

Contact: Families and Work Institute, 267 Fifth Avenue, Floor 2, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 465-2044 Fax: (212) 465-8637 Web Site: http://www.familiesandwork.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-888324-26-0.

Keywords: Child care, Community participation, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Family support programs, Work family issues, Working hours

Wallin HKM. 1997. The effects of maternal work choices and family-friendly employer policies on child outcomes. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Georgetown Public Policy Institute, 50 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses a research project on how the mother's working hours during the infant's first few months affect her infant's development by the age of four or five years. The study uses the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth for its data, and focuses on the effects of the timing of the return to work, the number of hours worked, and the presence of family-friendly policies in the workplace on children's behavior and home environment scores. The author makes recommendations about the effect of family-friendly policies on the employer, as well as on the mother and child.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Employee benefits, Employer initiatives, Infant development, Infant stimulation, Policy analysis, Socioeconomic status, Work family issues, Working hours, Working mothers, Working parents

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.