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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (30 total).

Meyer BD, Wherry LR. 2012. Saving teens: Using a policy discontinuity to estimate the effects of Medicaid eligibility. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 36 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18309)

Annotation: This paper uses a policy discontinuity to identify immediate and long-term effects of public health insurance coverage during childhood. The identification strategy employed exploited a unique feature of several early Medicaid expansions that extended eligibility only to children born after September 30, 1983. The authors examined changes in mortality rates by underlying causes of death, distinguishing between deaths due to internal and external causes. They also examined outcomes separately for black children and white children. Topics include the discontinuity in eligibility, research designs, outcomes and data, mortality results, and interpreting the estimates.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Children, Eligibility, Health insurance, Medicaid, Mortality, Public policy, Research, Statistical data, Trends, Uninsured persons, Whites

Leigh WA, Wheatley AL. 2009. Trends in child health 1997-2006: Assessing black-white disparities. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 24 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about how child health indicators vary between black children and white children. Indicators discussed include low birthweight, health status, oral health care, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disability, lifetime astha diagnosis; and activity limitation.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Blacks, Child health, Children, Children with special health care needs, Learning disabilities, Low birthweight, Oral Health, Oral health, Racial factors, Whites

Leigh WA, Wheatley AL. 2009. Trends in child health 1997-2006: Assessing Hispanic-white disparities. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 28 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about how child health indicators vary between Hispanic children and white children. Indicators discussed include low birthweight, health status, oral health care, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disability, lifetime asthma diagnosis; and activity limitation.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Asthma, Attention deficit disorder, Child health, Children, Children with special health care needs, Hispanic Americans, Learning disabilities, Low birthweight, Oral health, Racial factors, Whites

Leigh WA, Wheatley AL. 2009. Trends in child health 1997-2006: Assessing racial/ethnic disparities in asthma. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the lifetime prevalence of asthma among children and adolescents under age 18 who are African American, Hispanic, or white. Differences between and similarities among the three groups of children and adolescents are noted. Pair wise comparisons are made among the three groups of children and adolescents overall and between pairs of children or adolescents in the various racial and ethnic groups in families with comparable sociodemographic characteristics.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Asthma, Blacks, Child health, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Racial factors, Whites

Leigh WA, Wheatley AL. 2009. Trends in child health 1997-2006: Assessing racial/ethnic disparities in low birthweight. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 16 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines the prevalence of having been born with low birthweight among children and adolescents under age 18 who are African American, Hispanic, or white. Differences between and similarities among the the groups of children and adolescents -- in terms for the frequency with which low birthweight occcurs -- are noted. The analysis makes comparisons among the three groups of children and adolescents overall and among children or adolescents in the various racial and ethnic groups in families with comparable sociodemographic characteristics.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Blacks, Child health, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Infant health, Low birthweight, Racial factors, Whites

Chay KY, Guryan J, Mazumder B. 2009. Birth cohort and the black-white achievement gap: The roles of access and health soon after birth. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 15078)

Annotation: This paper examines data from average test scores and measures of health to analyze how access to health care during very early ages affects the later achievements of blacks relative to whites.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescents, Blacks, Early childhood development, Infants, Toddlers, Whites, Youth

Davis LM, Kilburn MR, Schultz DJ. 2009. Reparable harm: Assessing and addressing disparities faced by boys and men of color in California. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 122 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes a conceptual framework which describes macro, community, interpersonal, and individual level contextual factors that interact to promote or inhibit positive health outcomes. It then examines disparities in socioeconomic, physical and mental health, safety, and readiness to learn indicators that exist between boys and men of color and white boys and men in California. It calculates the odds for outcomes across a variety of indicators in these four domains to illustrate the challenges that boys and men of color are more likely to face in succeeding in life. It reviews strategies, practices, and policies for reducing these disparities and concludes with an appendix of data on additional indicators.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $55 plus shipping and handling, or available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-4561-4.

Keywords: Adolescent males, Blacks, California, Environmental influences, Health, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Learning, Male children, Men, Minority groups, Safety, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Whites, Young men

Hernandez DJ, Macartney SE. 2008. Racial-ethnic inequality in child well-being from 1985-2004: Gaps narrowing, but persist. [New York, NY]: Foundation for Child Development , 14 pp.

Annotation: This report analyzes child well-being trends from the perspective of race and ethnicity to better understand how the differences between white and black children and white and Hispanic children have changed on key indicators and domains over the decades and what these changes could signal for the efforts of policymakers and others to reduce racial-ethnic disparities and improve the well-being of all U.S. children. Topics include (1) movement toward or away from equality for different groups of children, (2) how long it may take to close gaps between different groups of children, (3) achieving better well-being for all children, and (4) persistent gaps. Specific black-white and Hispanic-white gaps are also discussed in detail. Conclusions are included.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Minority groups, Blacks, Children, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Public policy, Racial factors, Trends, Whites

Sing M. 2008. Differences in access to care for non-Hispanic Asian and non-Hispanic white children, 2002-2005. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 7 pp. (MEPS statistical brief, no. 224)

Annotation: This brief compares access to health care for three groups of non-Hispanic Asian and white children and adolescents ages 2-17: (1) all children and adolescents, (2) children and adolescent born in the United States, and (3) immigrants. It presents data on the average percentage of children and adolescents in the past year who had (1) a usual source of care, (2) one or more office visits, (3) one or more dental visits, (4) no health insurance coverage for an entire calendar year, and (5) no health insurance coverage for an 6 to 12 months in the past year.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Asian Americans, Child health, Immigrants, Oral health, Statistical data, Uninsured persons, Whites

Fox HB, McManus MA, Zarit M, Fairbrother G, Cassedy AE, Bethell CD, Read D. 2007. Racial and ethnic disparities in adolescent health and access to care. Washington, DC: Incenter Strategies, 8 pp. (Fact sheet; no. 1)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides new national information on disparities in health status and access to care among Hispanic, black, and white adolescents ages 12-17. It addresses racial and ethnic disparities for a broad set of indicators and also examines the impact of income, insurance, and mother's or household education on these indicators. A description of the methodology used for the analysis, as well as conclusions, is included. The fact sheet also includes endnotes.

Contact: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health , 1615 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3557 E-mail: info@thenationalalliance.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalalliance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Blacks, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Ethnic factors, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Racial factors, Whites

Fox HB, McManus MA, Zarit M, Cassedy AE, Fairbrother G. 2007. Racial and ethnic disparities in health and access among older adolescents. Washington, DC: Incenter Strategies, 6 pp. (Fact sheet; no. 2)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides new national information on disparities in health status and access to care among Hispanic, black, and white adolescents ages 18-21. A set of five widely used indicators was selected to assess whether income, insurance, and mother's education explain racial and ethnic differences. A description of the methodology used for the analysis, as well as conclusions, is included. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures. The fact sheet also includes endnotes.

Contact: National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health , 1615 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3557 E-mail: info@thenationalalliance.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalalliance.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Blacks, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Ethnic factors, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Racial factors, Whites

Escarce JJ. 2007. Racial and ethnic disparities in access to and quality of health care. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Synthesis Project, 28 pp. (Research synthesis report no. 12)

Annotation: This report looks at evidence from research on racial and ethnic disparities in health care. The report assesses whether racial and ethnic disparities in access remain after adjusting for factors such as insurance and socioeconomic status and also sheds light on the contributions of these factors to observed disparities. The report focuses on two key dimensions of health care -- access and quality -- and on three racial and ethnic groups for which a body of research has accumulated -- non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics. The report examines the evidence on the following questions: (1) what is the size of racial and ethnic disparities in access to care, and to what extent are these disparities explained by factors other than race? and (2) what is the size of racial and ethnic disparities in quality and appropriateness of health care, and to what extent are these disparities explained by factors other than race? Findings, implications for policymakers, and the need for additional information are discussed. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes two appendices: (1) references and (2) methodological discussions.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Blacks, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Health care, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Public policy, Racial factors, Research, Whites

Hernandez DJ, Macartney SE. [2006]. Measuring social disparities: A modified approach to the Index of Child Well-Being (CWI) for race-ethnic, immigrant-generation, and socioeconomic groups with new results for whites, blacks, and Hispanics. [NewYork, NY]: Foundation for Child Development, 16 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents a methodology that measures disparities across children in different ethnic groups (white, African Americans, and Hispanics), including future trends in disparities.The methodology makes it possible to show whether disparities have been eliminated or how much change would be required to eliminate disparities. Topics include (1) methodology for the current Index of Child Well-Being (CWI), (2) modified methodology for special racial and ethnic groups, (3) selected results using the modified methodology, (4) magnitudes and trends in racial-ethnic disparities, (5) trends in the black-white CWI disparity, (6) trends in the Hispanic-white CWI disparity, and (7) conclusions. References are included.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Minority groups, Children, Ethnic factors, Hispanics, Racial factors, Trends, Whites, Blacks

Capizzano J, Adams G, Ost J. 2006. Caring for children of color: The child care patterns of white, black, and Hispanic children under 5. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 41 pp. (Occasional paper no. 72)

Annotation: This paper investigates child care patterns uncovered in past research to determine whether they hold for white, black, and Hispanic children separately or if these subgroups exhibit patterns that differ from the patterns for children nationally. The paper looks at different economic, work, and family situations. The paper, which includes an executive summary, discusses (1) the data and methods used, (2) demographic and socioeconomic differences among white, black, and Hispanic families; (3) child care patterns in families where both parents work, (4) patterns by age of the child, (5) patterns by family structure, (6) patterns by family income, (7) patterns by primary caregiver's education level, (8) patterns by parental availability, (9) patterns by primary caregiver's work schedule, (10) patterns by presence of nonparental relatives in the household, and (11) patterns by region. A summary and policy implications are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Child care, Economic factors, Families, Hispanic Americans, Minority groups, Public policy, Racial factors, Research, Whites, Working parents, Young children

Douglas-Hall A, Koball H. 2006. The new poor: Regional trends in child poverty since 2000. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information about changes in the levels of child poverty, by U.S. region, since 2000. The report focuses on trends in child poverty in the Midwest and the West and among children of immigrants in the South and white children in the Northeast. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. A summary, policy implications, and endnotes are included.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Immigrants, Poverty, Public policy, Regional factors, Trends, Whites

Osborne C. 2004. The relationship between family structure and mothering behavior within race and ethnic groups. Princeton, NJ: Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Princeton University, 41 pp. (Working paper no. 04-06-FF)

Annotation: This paper addresses two main questions: (1) Is there a relationship between family structure and mothering within race and ethnic groups? And (2) Does this relationship vary across groups? In particular, the paper investigates a mother's playful interaction and spanking with her 1-year-old child across five different family structures for white, black, and Hispanic mothers of Mexican descent. The paper provides background, discusses the data and methodology, and offers results and a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper also includes references.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Children, Ethnic factors, Families, Hispanic Americans, Infants, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parents, Play, Racial factors, Research, Whites

Costa DL. 2003. Race and pregnancy outcomes in the twentieth century: A long-term comparison. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 33 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 9593)

Annotation: This paper documents the differential 20th century trends in black and white pregnancy outcomes and examines what socioeconomic and maternal health factors explained these differentials in past and recent times. Sections include a 20th century history of producing healthy babies; a description of the records from Johns Hopkins University (JHU), spanning the years 1897 to 1935, that were used in the survey along with data from the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS); pregnancy outcome trends; the empirical framework; birth outcomes and race at JHU and in 1988; and conclusions. Topics include the historic roles played by sexually transmitted diseases, breastfeeding, marriage rates, socioeconomic factors, nutrition disorders, and other lifestyle differences between blacks and whites. An appendix discusses the nature of data used in the research. References are provided. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures grouped at the end of the paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding, Economic factors, History, Infant health, Infant mortality, Infant mortality, Lifestyle, Nutrition disorders, Pregnancy outcome, Racial factors, Research, Sexually transmitted diseases, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Surveys, Trends, Whites, Women's health

Shin P, Jones K, Rosenbaum, S. 2003. Reducing racial and ethnic disparities: Estimating the impact of high health center penetration in low-income communities. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Center for Health Services Research and Policy, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a study on the impact of health centers at the state level. The study compared the magnitude of state-level racial and ethnic disparities for certain key health indicators and the proportion of low-income persons served by health centers for each state. The report includes an executive summary, a background and overview section, a methods section, a findings section, and a conclusion. The findings section is broken down into a discussion of black and white health disparities, Hispanic and white health disparities, and findings from health center interviews. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. The report concludes with a note on the study's limitations.

Contact: George Washington University, Center for Health Policy Research, 2021 K Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 994-4100 Fax: (202) 994-4040 E-mail: info@gwhealthpolicy.org Web Site: http://publichealth.gwu.edu/projects/center-health-policy-research Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Blacks, Community health centers, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Low income groups, Minority health, Racial factors, State programs, Whites

Tschann JM. 2002. Interparental conflict and adolescent violence: Final report. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes a longitudinal follow-up of a previously-funded study of the relationship between parental marital conflict and adolescent violence. Topics include violence between married parents, peer violence and victimization, sexual aggression and victimization, cultural factors and variances between Latin American and European American adolescents, and dating violence and victimization. Report contents include an executive summary; an introduction to the nature, scope, and methods of the investigation and findings; a review of the literature; a description of the study design and methods; research findings; a discussion of findings; a list of products generated during the course of the study; and references. Statistical data are presented in tables and figures at the end of the report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Aggression, California, Cultural factors, Domestic violence, Ethnic factors, Family violence, Final reports, Hispanic Americans, MCH research, Violence, Whites

Brown B, Kinkukawa A, Michelson E, Moore A, Moore KA, Sugland B. [2000]. A century of children's health and well-being. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 8 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief illustrates the improvements that have been made in children's health in the last century and the continuing disparities that exist between black and white children. Data cover mortality and health, socioeconomic well-being, and the new morbidities. This publication was supported by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Child health, Children, Health status, Statistics, Whites

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.