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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (117 total).

National Child Welfare Association. n.d.. Posters. New York, NY: National Child Welfare Association, 5 items.

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2016. Mandatory reporters of child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document provides the statutory basis for identifying persons who are required to report child maltreatment under certain circumstances for all of the United States, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. Lists include a description of the person required to report maltreatment, standards for making a report, privileged communications, and inclusion or other disclosure of the reporter’s identity.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child welfare, Children, Legal definitions, Legal responsibility, Legislation, Maltreated children, Oral health, Standards

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Leonard S, Fantroy JD, Lafferty K. 2013. Help me to succeed: A guide for supporting youth in foster care to prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy; Atlanta, GA: Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power and Potential, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide combines messages directly from youth in foster care in Georgia with national research to provide insight and advice to adults working in the child welfare sector. It outlines how understanding a young person's feelings and opinions regarding the risks of early pregnancy and prevention strategies can help child welfare professionals provide more effective support.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Foster care, Georgia, Prevention programs, State programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Welfare services

Quinterno J. 2013. A stronger safety net for America's children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper offers an introduction to some of the opportunities and challenges facing public safety net and work support programs. It summarizes key features of such initiatives and then explains their collective significance, paying special attention to their importance for the well-being and development of children. A review of limitations comes next, followed by an overview of some of the state-level reform efforts currently underway. The conclusion recommends several matters for the consideration of concerned public officials at the federal level.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support services, Federal programs, State initiatives, Welfare agencies

Child Welfare League of America. 2013. National blueprint for excellence in child welfare: Standards of excellence—Raising the bar for children, families, and communities. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 142 pp.

Annotation: This blueprint presents a vision for the future of child welfare that all children will grow up safely in loving families and supportive communities. The blueprint is intended to be a catalyst for change and also to serve as the basis for updating and creating Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) program-specific standards of excellence. The blueprint discusses CWLA vision and values and presents eight core principles and standards on the following topics: rights of children; shared responsibility and leadership; engagement/participation; supports and services; quality improvement; work force; race, ethnicity, and culture; and funding and resources.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org $24.95 for non-members, $19.95 for members; also available as .pdf , $11.95 for non-members, . Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58760-152-1.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children, Children's rights, Communities, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Families, Family support services, Financing, Leadership, Programs, Racial factors, Safety, Standards

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. What is child welfare? A guide for health-care professionals. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 4 pp. (Factsheet )

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information about child welfare. The fact sheets describes what child welfare agencies typically do. It also discusses how health professionals can help child welfare workers collaborate to support families and prevent child abuse and neglect, identify and support suspected child abuse and neglect, know the laws about confidentiality and privacy, use trauma-informed practices, and serve as resources for child welfare agencies and families. Also discussed is how how child welfare workers can help health professionals by ensuring that health professionals have what they need to treat children, helping children and families access health care services, and coordinating the health care needs of adolescents aging out of foster care. Resources for more information are included.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child welfare agencies, Collaboration, Family support services, Foster care, Health services, Legislation, Prevention, Service coordination

Zero to Three. 2013. State child welfare policies and practices that support infants and toddlers. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 5 items.

Annotation: This webinar presents findings from a 2013 survey of state child welfare agencies about the policies and practices that guide the agencies' work in addressing the needs of infants and toddlers who have been maltreated. It demonstrates how three states' policies and practices reflect a developmental approach to child welfare services for young children. The website includes links the audio presentation, the slides, and the survey upon which the webinar is based. A link to the print copy of the survey report is also provided.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development services, Child welfare agencies, Maltreated children, National surveys, Policy, Research, Young children

Fordham Interdisciplinary Parent Representation Project. [2012]. Guide to working with young parents in out of home care. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and guidance for working with pregnant and parenting youth, helping them as they develop both as individuals and as parents through positive casework interactions. The guide encourages a strengths-based approach to ensure the safety of both young parents and their children. It offers suggestions for engaging young parents in conferencing and supportive services while highlighting the importance of maintaining a young parent’s right to privacy and autonomy, and emphasize comprehensive planning for pregnant young people to promote well being, to minimize the need for court intervention, to ensure placement stability and to help young families move more quickly toward permanency. The guide is designed to be used primarily by provider agency case planners, but may also be useful to child protective staff, Family Services Unit staff, parent advocates, attorneys and others who work with this vulnerable population. Topics in planning and services for young parents in out of home care include: legal issues, father participation, collaborative planning and permanency, preventive services, child safety conferences, court intervention, pregnancy-related services, medical home visiting programs, parenting supports, counseling and mental health services, education, child care, and preparing a young parent for leaving foster care. Appendices provide resources for services in adolescent reproductive health, breastfeeding, the WIC program, support services and assistance, teen father support, mentoring and mental health, housing support, legal information, education, hoe visiting, and parenting education programs. Tips sheets are provided on mandatory reporting, early care and education, public housing, and transitional Medicaid.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. The story of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: Administration for Children and Families, 39 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the 100-year history of the U.S. Children's Bureau dedicated to the welfare of the nation's children. Topics include involvement in issues such as infant mortality, dependent children, child labor hours and conditions, child abuse and neglect prevention, foster care, and adoption services. Contents include collaboration, assistance to states and tribes, research and data, getting the word out, and leadership. A website also presents the Children's Bureau history. A version of the printed history is also available in Spanish at https://cb100.acf.hhs.gov/sites/all/themes/danland/danblog/files/Story_of_CB_Spanish.pdf.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child labor, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Federal agencies, Foster care, History, Infant mortality, Infants, Spanish language materials, U. S. Children's Bureau, Welfare reform, Welfare services

New York City Administration for Children's Services. 2012. ABCs of working with young parents in out of home care: Expectations, responsibilities and resources. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document is a source of information and guidance for case planners in New York City in their work with parenting youth and youth planning for the arrival of their baby in foster care, and in developing appropriate service plans for these youth. It discusses roles for agency case planners in referring both expecting mothers and fathers of health and support systems, discussing the role of resource parents for minors who are expecting, securing a stable placement for expecting youth before baby arrives, as well as developing and executing permanency plans for young parents in out-of-home care. Additional information is provided on health care testing and decision-making, legal aspects of pregnancy and parenting, and understanding funding for baby's essential needs. A practice guide summary is included along with resources for community based services, housing and child care, child welfare services, medical mentoring for pregnant and parenting youth, and prevention services.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2011. Major federal legislation concerned with child protection, child welfare, and adoption. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 23 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes federal legislation that has helped shape the delivery of child welfare services in the United States. It includes a timeline of the federal legislation that has significantly impacted child protection, social welfare, and adoption since 1974. An overview of each act and its major provisions is also included. The online version provides links to the federal legislation.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child protective services, Child welfare, Federal legislation, Service delivery

Hanson N, Hill KS. 2011. Defining the children's hospital role in child maltreatment. (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions, 84 pp.

Annotation: This book outlines what a child protection team at a children’s hospital should offer in terms of infrastructure, staffing, functions, and systems to be considered either basic, advanced, or a center of excellence. The book discusses each of these three tiers, explaining how they serve as a framework for hospital self assessment and are not intended as a ranking for competitive evaluation. The first section covers medical leadership, team administration, and social work; the second section covers clinical services, policies, prevention, advocacy, community collaboration, education, and research; and the third section covers funding, reimbursement, and risk management. The benefit to the community is covered in a special section.

Contact: Children's Hospital Association, 600 13th Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 753-5500 Web Site: http://www.childrenshospitals.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child abuse, Child protective services, Child welfare, Maltreated children, Pediatric hospitals, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Social work

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2011. Child welfare terms: English to Spanish. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 18 pp.

Annotation: This glossary lists child welfare terms in English and corresponding Spanish terms. The glossary offers a primary term along with options to provide flexibility and allow for regional and personal preferences.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Communication, Culturally competent services, Dictionaries, Service delivery, Spanish language materials

Child Welfare League of America. 2010. The nation's children 2010. Arlington, VA: Child Welfare League of America, 10 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides statistical information about children in the United States in 2010. In addition to general information, the fact sheet presents information about the most vulnerable children, child abuse and neglect, permanent families for children, kinship support, child poverty and income support, child care and Head Start, health, child and youth mental health, substance abuse and child welfare, vulnerable youth, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, funding child welfare services, and the child welfare work force. Separate fact sheets are available for each state and the District of Columbia, as well.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Juvenile justice, Statistics, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child care, Child health, Child neglect, Child welfare services, Children, Families, Financing, Head Start, Juvenile delinquency, Low income groups, Mental health, Poverty, Prevention, Substance abuse, Substance abuse, Vulnerability

Zero to Three. 2009. Tracking services for infants, toddlers, and their families: A look at federal early childhood programs and the roles of state and local governments. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 26 pp.

Annotation: This chart, which is geared toward members of the ZERO TO THREE policy network who advocate for infants and young children, summarizes the primary federal programs currently focused on very young children and the roles of federal, state, and local governments in these programs. The chart is divided into issue categories to help readers identify the programs and services that most closely align with their area of professional interest and expertise. These issue categories include child care and early childhood education, child welfare, health and mental health, poverty, and professional development and higher education.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Child welfare, Early childhood education, Education, Federal programs, Infants, Local programs, Mental health, Poverty, Professional education, Services, State programs, Young children

Han W, Ruhm C, Waldfogel J, Washbrook E. 2009. Public policies and women's employment after childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 45 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14660)

Annotation: This paper examines how the public policy environment in the United States affects work by new mothers following childbirth. The authors examine four types of policies that vary across states and affect the budget constraints in different ways. Specifically, the authors examine how state parental leave laws, child care subsidies, cash welfare and food stamp benefit generosity, and welfare work requirements for mothers of infants affect the employment patterns of mothers of newborns and young children.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Food stamp program, Parental leave, Public policy, Welfare services, Working mothers

National Commission on Children and Disasters. 2009. Interim report. Washington, DC: National Commission on Children and Disasters, 87 pp.

Annotation: This report provides recommendations for preparing to meet children's needs in the event of a disaster. The recommendations fall within these categories: (1) disaster management and recovery, (2) mental health, (3) child physical health and trauma, (4) emergency medical services and pediatric transport, (5) disaster care management, (6) child care, (7) elementary and secondary education, (8) child welfare and juvenile justice, (9) sheltering standards, (10) housing, and (11) evacuation.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Disaster planning, Education, Emergencies, Emergency medical services, Housing, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Trauma

Barth RP, Scarborough AA, Lloyd, EC, Losby JL, Casanueva C, Mann T. 2008. Developmental status and early intervention service needs of maltreated children: Final report. [Wasjhington, DC]: Institute for Social and Economic Development, 59 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study on the developmental status and early intervention service needs of maltreated children. The study addresses the following questions: (1) to what extent do maltreated children have developmental problems or are subject to factors associated with poor developmental outcomes?, (2) what services might maltreated children be eligible for, and what services are they receiving through child welfare systems?, (3) what child or case characteristics (e.g., child welfare setting) influence developmental service receipt by maltreated children?, and (4) what barriers to service provision and solutions have experts in the field identified? The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following main sections: (1) introduction, (2) major findings, (3) areas for future research, and (4) conclusions. References are included. The report includes one appendix: a glossary of terms.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child development disorders, Child development services, Child health services, Child welfare, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Eligibility, Maltreated children, Research, Service delivery systems

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.