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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (91 total).

Commission to Eliminate Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities. 2016. WIthin our reach: A national strategy to eliminate child abuse and neglect fatalities. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 167 pp.

Annotation: This final report presents a vision for realigning organizations, communities, and priorities to identify and support children at highest risk of abuse or neglect fatality. Contents include recommendations for addressing the needs of American Indian/Alaska Native children and reducing child abuse and neglect deaths in disproportionately affected communities, improving leadership and accountability, grounding decisions in better data and research, and enhancing multidisciplinary support for families. A report fact sheet, social media toolkit, public meeting materials, deliberations, and resources on child abuse and neglect fatalities and National Child Abuse Prevention Month are also available.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Child abuse, Child death, Child neglect, Children, Decision making, Family centered care, Injury prevention, Leadership, Multidisciplinary approach, National initiatives, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, Strategic plans, Systems development, Welfare reform

Golden O, Emam D. 2013. How health care reform can help children and families in the child welfare system: Options for action. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 31 pp. (Low-income working families, paper 25)

Annotation: This paper considers the implications of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on child welfare families, specifically on youth aging out of foster care, parents and guardians of children in (or at risk of entering) the child welfare system, and children already involved in the system. It also offers potential strategies for action by state and federal child welfare and health officials, philanthropic funders, and outside expert to enhance coverage and improve care.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child welfare, Children, Expanded eligibility, Federal initiatives, Foster care, Foster parents, Health care reform, Health insurance, Low income groups, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State initiatives

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2012. The story of the Children's Bureau. [Washington, DC]: Administration for Children and Families, 39 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the 100-year history of the U.S. Children's Bureau dedicated to the welfare of the nation's children. Topics include involvement in issues such as infant mortality, dependent children, child labor hours and conditions, child abuse and neglect prevention, foster care, and adoption services. Contents include collaboration, assistance to states and tribes, research and data, getting the word out, and leadership. A website also presents the Children's Bureau history. A version of the printed history is also available in Spanish at https://cb100.acf.hhs.gov/sites/all/themes/danland/danblog/files/Story_of_CB_Spanish.pdf.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child labor, Child neglect, Child welfare, Children, Federal agencies, Foster care, History, Infant mortality, Infants, Spanish language materials, U. S. Children's Bureau, Welfare reform, Welfare services

Todd JE, Newman C, Ver Ploeg M. 2010. Changing participation in food assistance programs among low-income children after welfare reform. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 30 pp.

Annotation: This study investigates changes in the relative importance of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program and food assistance programs by examining changes in the program participation status of children's households and the amounts received from each program both before and after welfare reform. The study also explores how changes in participation status and benefit amounts differed according to household income before and after receiving benefits relative to the poverty line. Finally, the study estimates changes to the turnover rates in each program.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Children, Families, Income factors, Low income groups, Poverty, Research, Supplemental food programs, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Welfare reform

Wertheimer R, Moore KA, Burkhauser M. 2008. The well-being of children in working poor and other families: 1997 and 2004. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 8 pp. (Research brief 2008-33)

Annotation: This brief focuses on child well-being in the wake of welfare reform legislation implemented in 1996. The brief looks at outcomes including (1) measures of how well a child is developing, (2) measures of how well a child will develop, and (3) measures of interaction within the community. The authors sought to determine whether increased employment among poor families led to deteriorating child outcomes. Topics include changes in child well-being between 1997 and 2004 and differences in well-being between children in working poor families and those in non-working-poor families in 2004.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Communities, Families, Income factors, Legislation, Low income groups, Trends, Welfare reform, Working parents

Knab J, McLanahan S, Garfinkel, I. 2006. The effects of welfare and child support policies on maternal health. Princeton, NJ: Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Princeton University, 31 pp. (Working papaer no. 2006-04-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines the effects of post-reform welfare and child support policies on maternal health and health behavior using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. The paper introduces the issue, provides background, discusses the data and methods, presents results, and offers a discussion and conclusions. References are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child support, Children, Families, Health behavior, MCH research, Public policy, Welfare reform, Welfare services, Women's health

Project on State-Level Child Outcomes. [2005]. Welfare reform and children: A synthesis of impacts in five states. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 80 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the question of whether and how pilot welfare reform programs launched in five states -- Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, and Minnesota -- affected children's developmental outcomes. The report synthesizes results from experimental studies in the five states looking first at adult economic outcomes that the programs aimed to change and then turning to aspects of young children's lives -- including child care and home environment -- that may also have been changed by the programs. Finally, the report focuses on how children themselves were affected by the programs. The report includes an executive summary and a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report and in appendices. Endnotes are included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child development, Children, Connecticut, Economic factors, Families, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Parents, Pilot projects, State programs, Welfare reform, Young children

Jacknowitz A. 2005. An investigation of the factors influencing breastfeeding patterns. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 115 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes a dissertation on breastfeeding rates, policies, and disparities. Topics include changing demographics, welfare work requirements and child well-being: evidence from the effects on breastfeeding, and the role of workplace characteristics in breastfeeding practices. Numerous tables throughout the document offer statistics on research data and methodology. References are also provided.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Cultural factors, Educational factors, Ethnic factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Trends, Welfare reform, Work family issues, Working mothers

Meyer BD, Sullivan JX. 2005. The well-being of single-mother families after welfare reform. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 8 pp. (Welfare reform and beyond; no. 33)

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the well-being of single-mother families after welfare reform as reflected by two different indicators: income and consumption. The authors discuss the differences in trends evidenced by income vs. consumption data, explain the differences, discuss the effects of recent policy changes on well-being, and present policy implications. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the brief. A list of related Brookings Institution resources and a list of related readings are provided.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Families, Family income, Public policy, Single mothers, Trends, Welfare reform

Abstinence in Motion (AIM) Project. [2004]. Giving our most vulnerable a first line of defense: The results of the AIM Community-Based Abstinence Education Project for Rural Alabama. [Troy, AL]: Abstinence in Motion (AIM) Project, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of the AIM Community-Based Abstinence Education Project for Rural Alabama. The AIM Project is an abstinence education outreach program focusing on rural communities in the state. The report describes the project and discusses (1) how welfare reform and abstinence education work together against child poverty, (2) scientific evaluation of the project, (3) student satisfaction with the project, and (4) reducing welfare payrolls and poverty in rural Alabama. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: AIM Project, Troy Regional Medical Center, 1340 Highway 231 South Suite 1, Troy, AL 36081, Telephone: (334) 670-5261 Fax: (334) 670-5256 E-mail: info@aimproject.com Web Site: http://www.aimproject.com Available at no charge.

Keywords: Abstinence education, Alabama, Child health, Children, Communities, Evaluation, Outreach, Poverty, Rural populations, SPRANS, State projects, Students, Welfare reform, Welfare services

Stroul BA, Pires SA, Armstrong MI. 2004. Health Care Reform Tracking Project: Tracking state managed care reforms as they affect children and adolescents with behavioral health disorders and their families—2003 state survey. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 180 pp.

Annotation: This report represents one component of the Health Care Reform Tracking Project -- a 5-year project designed to track and analyze the impact of public sector managed care reforms on children and adolescents with emotional and substance abuse problems and their families. The report focuses on surveys of all the states. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains information about state managed care initiatives, populations covered by managed care reform, managed care entities, service coverage and capacity, special provisions for youth with serious and complex behavioral health needs, financing and risk, clinical decision-making and management mechanisms, access, service coordination, early identification and intervention, cultural competence, family involvement, providers, accountability, the State Children's Health Insurance Program, and Concluding Observations. Two appendices provide the survey instrument and a list of technical assistance materials. Data are presented in tables throughout the report. The report also includes a child welfare special analysis.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Accountability, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Affective disorders, Child behavior, Child welfare, Children, Culturally competent services, Early intervention, Emotional instability, Ethics, Families, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Managed care, State health insurance programs, State initiatives, Substance abuse, Surveys

National Governor's Association, Center for Best Practices. 2004. Child and youth well-being under welfare reform: Recent research. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, 10 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief discusses recent research on the well-being of children and adolescents under welfare reform. The brief, which includes an executive summary, also includes the following main sections: (1) how are children and youth faring under welfare reform? (2) the verdict is still forthcoming on harm or benefit from welfare reform, and (3) how do specific welfare policies affect children and youth? The brief offers conclusions and includes endnotes.

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Low income groups, Public policy, Welfare reform

National Governor's Association, Center for Best Practices. 2004. Child and youth well-being under welfare reform: State policy options. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, 10 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief discusses state policy options for improving the well-being of children within the welfare system as well as the broader population of low-income children. The brief also explores additional funding sources for child well-being initiatives, including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the Social Services Block grant, WIA (Work Investment Act) youth funds, child and maternal health grants, and other resources. The brief offers descriptions of programs in specific states, additional online resources on tracking child outcomes, conclusions and endnotes.

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Block grants, Child health, Children, Financing, Initiatives, Low income groups, Maternal health, Public policy, Social services, State programs, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Welfare programs, Welfare reform

Handler A. 2004. The effect of welfare reform on low-income pregnant women's insurance status and prenatal care utilization: Final report. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois School of Public Health, Community Health Sciences, 72 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) from 1994-1996 and 1998-2000 in eight states to examine the impact of welfare reform on the insurance coverage and prenatal care utilization of women receiving public assistance as well as low-income women who are not recipients of public assistance. Report contents include an executive summary, introduction into the nature and scope of the research problem, a review of the literature, the study design and methods, details on the study groups, a presentation of findings, sections on discussion of findings and conclusions, as well as a list of products produced during the study and references. The appendix includes a sample PRAMS questionnaire. Statistics are presented throughout the report in tables and figures. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Final reports, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Low income groups, MCH research, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Questionnaires, Welfare reform

Kaestner R, Lee WC. 2003. The effect of welfare reform on prenatal care and birth weight. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 30 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 9769)

Annotation: This paper examines the effect of welfare reform or loss of health insurance on prenatal care utilization of women with low levels of education and their infant's birthweight. The paper includes a discussion of the impact of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act on health insurance coverage; welfare reform, prenatal care utilization, and infant health; a description of the empirical framework and of the data sources used in the study; a results section; and a conclusion. A reference list is provided and statistical information is presented in several tables grouped together at the end of paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational attainment, Health care utilization, Infant health, Low birthweight, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Welfare reform, Women

Loeb S, Fuller B, Kagan SL, Carrol J, Carroll, J. 2003. Child care in poor communities: Early learning effects of type, quality, and stability. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 34 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 9954)

Annotation: This paper reviews the status of young children in poor communities who are spending more hours in non-parental care due to policy reforms and expansion of early childhood programs. Topics include maternal employment, child care selection, local supply conditions, quality of care, and the impact on child development and child school readiness skills. The study methods, data analysis, results, and discussion are detailed. References and eleven tables of statistical data are provided.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood development, Intellectual development, Low income groups, Out of home care, Policy analysis, Research, Statistical data, Welfare reform, Working mothers, Young children

Corman H, Reichman NE, Noonan K. 2003. Mothers' and fathers' labor supply in fragile families: The role of child health. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 46 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 9918)

Annotation: This paper estimates the effect of poor child health on the labor supply of mothers and fathers post welfare reform, using a national sample of mostly unwed parents and their children -- a group at high risk of living in poverty. The paper includes an introduction, a background section, a description of the analytical framework, a data section, a discussion of the descriptive analysis, a results section, and a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper. The paper also includes a reference list.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Low income groups, Single parents, Welfare reform, Working parents

Kaestner R, Kaushal N. 2003. Welfare reform and health insurance coverage of low-income families. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 30 pp. (NBER working paper series no. W10033)

Annotation: This paper addresses the question of whether welfare reform adversely affected the health insurance coverage of low-educated single mothers and their children. Specifically, the authors investigated whether changes in the welfare caseload during the 1990s were associated with changes in Medicaid participation, private insurance coverage, and the number of uninsured among single mothers and their children The paper includes an abstract, an introduction, a background and literature review section, a discussion of the research design and statistical methods, a description of the data, a results section, and conclusions. The paper also includes a references list. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Health insurance, Low income groups, Medicaid, Research, Single mothers, Welfare reform

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2003. Welfare reform must protect the health of women and children. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document focuses on the importance of protecting the health of women, children, and families by helping them move out of poverty. It calls on Congress to adopt the following proposals in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families reauthorization: (1) increase funding for child care, (2) help parents care for children with special health care needs, (3) provide transitional medical assistance, (4) lift restrictions on legal immigrants, (5) prevent domestic violence, (6) expand definition of work, (7) include all families, such as children living with grandparents or other relatives, (8) build strong youth, (9) stop the "super waiver, " and (10) strengthen abstinence education.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescents, Child care, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Domestic violence, Families, Federal programs, Financing, Immigrants, Parents, Poverty, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Welfare reform, Women's health

Levin-Epstein J, Hutchins J. 2003. Teens and TANF: How adolescents fare under the nation's welfare program. Washington, DC: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief describes the history and main provisions of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, focusing on those that relate directly to adolescents, and describes what is currently known about the program's impact on three different groups of adolescents: TANF adolescents parents, adolescents living in TANF households, and adolescents who are involved with TANF-funded activities. Statistical information is presented in one figure within the brief. The brief concludes with a reference list.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Washington, DC Office/Public Affairs Center, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.kff.org/about/bjcc/bjcc_floor.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Low income groups, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Welfare reform

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.