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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (147 total).

Rutgers Occupational Training and Education Consortium. n.d.. Trauma training: Child development, trauma and the brain—The DYFS mental health screening program. Buhl, ID: National Family Preservation Network,

Annotation: This website links to a training guide and participant workbook that provide activities that focus on trauma as a way of understanding how children and adolescents in the child welfare system are especially vulnerable to mental health challenges. The training materials were developed to help providers think about the physical effects of trauma on children, adolescents and young adults; understand the biological underpinnings of their challenges; and identify children with a suspected mental health need. Included are activities to help providers administer the New Jersey Mental Health Screening Tool (MHST) to assist with identifying children who may have mental health need and require further assessment.

Contact: National Family Preservation Network, 3971 North 1400 East, Buhl, Idaho 83316, Telephone: (888) 498-9047 E-mail: director@nfpn.org Web Site: http://nfpn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children's mental health, Interventions, New Jersey, Screening, State programs, Training, Trauma

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2020. Primary prevention: Themes from fiscal year 2018 grantee site visits. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 10 pp. (Children's Bureau grantee synthesis)

Annotation: This Grantee Lessons Learned brief highlights common themes and unique examples gathered by grantees during Children's Bureau-led site visits to other jurisdictions with promising approaches to community-based primary prevention.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child welfare, Evidence based programs, Maltreated children, Model programs, Primary prevention

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Children's Defense Fund. 2015. Children in the states. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, multiple items.

Annotation: This report lists statistics by state for children participating in: federally subsidized programs, the National School Lunch program during FY 1996, the School Breakfast Program during FY 1996, and the WIC Food program during FY 1996. For each state there is also a page listing statistics in the form of "every 23 hours a baby died, every 7 days a youth committed suicide." These are for infant morbidity and mortality, violence, lack of prenatal care, child abuse, lack of health insurance, and teenage and unmarried mothers.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org $5.95 plus $3.00 shipping and handling for the first item ordered, and $1.00 for each additional item ordered.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Federal programs, Health insurance, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Statistics, Violence, WIC Program

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2015. Family engagement inventory. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource provides information about family engagement practices across child welfare, juvenile justice, behavioral health, education, and early education. Contents include links to organizations, agencies, and information that support family engagement within three domains. Contents include methods, plans of action, processes, and/or policies designed to be used by frontline staff of each discipline to enhance or achieve family engagement; links to and information on selected practices and programs that are validated and supported by a documented, evaluative process as they relate to family engagement; and links to information and websites that provide additional literature about family engagement processes, methods, and programs.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child welfare, Early childhood education, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Methods, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Participation, Research

Pires SA, Stroul BA, and Hendricks T, ed. 2013. Making Medicaid work for children in child welfare: Examples from the field. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 63 pp.

Annotation: This document discusses Medicaid strategies that emerged from a project conducted by the Center for Health Care Strategies to explore strategies used in selected states to improve Medicaid for children in child welfare. The document also presents case studies highlighting the experiences of Arizona, Massachusetts, Michigan, and New Jersey and concludes with a discussion of cross-state observations and lessons learned.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Child health, Child welfare, High risk children, Massachusetts, Medicaid, Michigan, New Jersey, State programs

Leonard S, Fantroy JD, Lafferty K. 2013. Help me to succeed: A guide for supporting youth in foster care to prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy; Atlanta, GA: Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power and Potential, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide combines messages directly from youth in foster care in Georgia with national research to provide insight and advice to adults working in the child welfare sector. It outlines how understanding a young person's feelings and opinions regarding the risks of early pregnancy and prevention strategies can help child welfare professionals provide more effective support.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Foster care, Georgia, Prevention programs, State programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Welfare services

Quinterno J. 2013. A stronger safety net for America's children. Washington, DC: First Focus, 24 pp.

Annotation: This paper offers an introduction to some of the opportunities and challenges facing public safety net and work support programs. It summarizes key features of such initiatives and then explains their collective significance, paying special attention to their importance for the well-being and development of children. A review of limitations comes next, followed by an overview of some of the state-level reform efforts currently underway. The conclusion recommends several matters for the consideration of concerned public officials at the federal level.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support services, Federal programs, State initiatives, Welfare agencies

Child Welfare League of America. 2013. National blueprint for excellence in child welfare: Standards of excellence—Raising the bar for children, families, and communities. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 142 pp.

Annotation: This blueprint presents a vision for the future of child welfare that all children will grow up safely in loving families and supportive communities. The blueprint is intended to be a catalyst for change and also to serve as the basis for updating and creating Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) program-specific standards of excellence. The blueprint discusses CWLA vision and values and presents eight core principles and standards on the following topics: rights of children; shared responsibility and leadership; engagement/participation; supports and services; quality improvement; work force; race, ethnicity, and culture; and funding and resources.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org $24.95 for non-members, $19.95 for members; also available as .pdf , $11.95 for non-members, . Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58760-152-1.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children, Children's rights, Communities, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Families, Family support services, Financing, Leadership, Programs, Racial factors, Safety, Standards

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

Calculating the Costs of Child Welfare Services Workgroup. 2013. Cost analysis in program evaluation: A guide for child welfare researchers and service providers. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 22 pp.

Annotation: This guide offers a framework for integrating cost analysis into program evaluations, presents key principles and concepts in cost analysis, provides guidance for defining the scope and purpose of a cost analysis and determining the information needed to conduct it, and explains steps in conducting a cost analysis. It provides illustrations of cost analysis of an intact family services program and of a home visiting program. Companion videos are also available.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Costs, Evaluation, Home visiting, MCH programs, Manuals, Program evaluation

Fordham Interdisciplinary Parent Representation Project. [2012]. Guide to working with young parents in out of home care. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and guidance for working with pregnant and parenting youth, helping them as they develop both as individuals and as parents through positive casework interactions. The guide encourages a strengths-based approach to ensure the safety of both young parents and their children. It offers suggestions for engaging young parents in conferencing and supportive services while highlighting the importance of maintaining a young parent’s right to privacy and autonomy, and emphasize comprehensive planning for pregnant young people to promote well being, to minimize the need for court intervention, to ensure placement stability and to help young families move more quickly toward permanency. The guide is designed to be used primarily by provider agency case planners, but may also be useful to child protective staff, Family Services Unit staff, parent advocates, attorneys and others who work with this vulnerable population. Topics in planning and services for young parents in out of home care include: legal issues, father participation, collaborative planning and permanency, preventive services, child safety conferences, court intervention, pregnancy-related services, medical home visiting programs, parenting supports, counseling and mental health services, education, child care, and preparing a young parent for leaving foster care. Appendices provide resources for services in adolescent reproductive health, breastfeeding, the WIC program, support services and assistance, teen father support, mentoring and mental health, housing support, legal information, education, hoe visiting, and parenting education programs. Tips sheets are provided on mandatory reporting, early care and education, public housing, and transitional Medicaid.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Allen KD, Pires SA, Mahadevan R. 2012. Improving outcomes for children in child welfare: A Medicaid managed care toolkit. [Hamilton, NJ]: Center for Health Care Strategies, 49 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit describes the efforts of the nine Medicaid managed care organizations (MCOs) that participated in Improving Outcomes for Children Involved in Child Welfare: A CHCS Quality Improvement Collaborative, designed by the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS) and funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. The toolkit includes a project overview, an overview and description of the impact of the MCOs' initiatives, and discussions of care coordination and lessons learned.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Ethnic factors, Foster care, Foster children, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Medicaid managed care, Mental health, Programs, Racial factors

New York City Administration for Children's Services. 2012. ABCs of working with young parents in out of home care: Expectations, responsibilities and resources. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document is a source of information and guidance for case planners in New York City in their work with parenting youth and youth planning for the arrival of their baby in foster care, and in developing appropriate service plans for these youth. It discusses roles for agency case planners in referring both expecting mothers and fathers of health and support systems, discussing the role of resource parents for minors who are expecting, securing a stable placement for expecting youth before baby arrives, as well as developing and executing permanency plans for young parents in out-of-home care. Additional information is provided on health care testing and decision-making, legal aspects of pregnancy and parenting, and understanding funding for baby's essential needs. A practice guide summary is included along with resources for community based services, housing and child care, child welfare services, medical mentoring for pregnant and parenting youth, and prevention services.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Murphey D. 2012. The Child Trends DataBank: A resource for indicators of child well-being . Washington, DC: Child Trends, 3 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information from a webinar presented by Child Trends on July 12, 2012, that focused on the Child Trends DataBank, which is a resource for indicators of child well-being. The report discusses Child Trends and offers information about the DataBank, ways to use it, and information it includes.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Child development, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Early childhood development, Education, Families, Fatherhood, Marriage, Mental health, Parenting skills, Poverty, Program, Programs, Public policy, Resource materials, Statistical data, Trends

U.S. Children's Bureau. 2011. Tip sheet for early childhood-child welfare partnership: Policies and programs that promote educational access, stability, and success for vulnerable children and families. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides information about federal polices and programs that promote access to high-quality, stable early care and education for children in the child welfare system and opportunities for strengthening collaborations between early childhood and child welfare systems. The tip sheet discusses the following topics: (1) Head Start eligibility, (2) child care subsidies, (3) child abuse prevention and treatment, and (4) use of Title IV-E funds. The following opportunities are also presented: (1) the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008, (2) the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, and (3) state advisory councils.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child abuse, Child care, Child welfare agencies, Collaboration, Costs, Early childhood education, Eligibility, Federal programs, Financing, Foster children, Head Start, Home visiting, Legislation, Prevention, Public policy, Service delivery systems, State programs, Treatment, Young children

Children and Family Futures. 2011. The collaborative practice model for family, recovery, safety and stability. Irvine, CA: Children and Family Futures, 39 pp.

Annotation: This document, which is geared toward state and community collaborative groups, discusses 10 system-linkage elements that child welfare, substance abuse treatment, and juvenile court dependency systems, as well as other agencies and providers working with these systems, can use to collaborate with one another. Topic include the elements of system linkages; the mission, underlying values, and principles of collaboration; screening and assessment; engagement and retention care; services to children of parents with substance use disorders; efficient communication and sharing information systems; budgeting and program sustainability; training and staff development; working with related agencies; joint accountability and shared outcomes; and resources and tools for elements of system linkages.

Contact: Children and Family Futures, 4940 Irvine Boulevard, Suite 202, Irvine, CA 92620, Telephone: (714) 505-3525 Fax: (714) 505-3626 E-mail: contact_us@cffutures.org Web Site: http://www.cffutures.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child welfare agencies, Children, Collaboration, Communication, Community programs, Families, Financing, Juvenile courts, Parents, Screening, Service delivery systems, State programs, Substance abuse treatment, Training

Todd JE, Newman C, Ver Ploeg M. 2010. Changing participation in food assistance programs among low-income children after welfare reform. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 30 pp.

Annotation: This study investigates changes in the relative importance of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program and food assistance programs by examining changes in the program participation status of children's households and the amounts received from each program both before and after welfare reform. The study also explores how changes in participation status and benefit amounts differed according to household income before and after receiving benefits relative to the poverty line. Finally, the study estimates changes to the turnover rates in each program.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Children, Families, Income factors, Low income groups, Poverty, Research, Supplemental food programs, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Welfare reform

Herbst CM, Tekin E. 2010. The impact of child care subsidies on child well-being: Evidence from geographic variation in the distance to social service agencies. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 59 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16250)

Annotation: This paper examines how state and federal child care subsidies intended to move economically disadvantaged parents from welfare to work might impact the well-being of children. Using data from the Kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, the authors identify the relationships of child care subsidies with child development using the geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home in order to reach the nearest social service agency that administers the subsidy application process as a factor. The authors posit that an unintended consequence of a child care subsidies that are conditional on parental employment might de-emphasize the importance of child care quality.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Behavior problems, Child care, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Economic factors, High risk children, Longitudinal studies, Research, Unintentional, Welfare programs

Child Welfare Information Gateay. 2010. Infant safe haven laws: Summary of state laws. [Washington, DC]: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 69 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes infant safe haven laws intended to provide incentive for mothers in crisis to safely relinquish their babies to designated locations where they will be protected and provided with medical care until a permanent home can be found. The report compares the infant safe haven legislation in the U.S. states and territories that have enacted such laws, describing who may legally leave an infant at a safe haven; who is considered to be a "safe haven provider;" and what the responsibilities of the providers are. The report also describes the immunity from liability that the providers receive as well as the protections from criminal liability (and the consequences of relinquishment) that parents receive under the safe haven laws.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Infant health, Law enforcement, Safety programs, State legislation

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.