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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (59 total).

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

Amercan Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide background information and recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. A pocket guide is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2016. Overweight and obesity in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find care, services, and support and websites about overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Bibliographies, Body weight, Child health, Children, Diet, Electronic publications, Exercise, Families, Health behavior, Nutrition, Obesity, Weight gain, Weight management

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation framework: Nutrition, physical activity, and obesity prevention indicators–Interpretive guide to the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 320 pp.

Annotation: This guide for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) administrators, evaluators, and others identifies and explains the indicators, outcome measures, and preferred methodologies for tracking success; developing state- and local-level objectives; and reporting program results. Contents include outcome indicators relevant to individuals, environmental settings, sectors of influence, population results, and social norms and values.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. SNAP-Ed strategies & interventions: An obesity prevention toolkit for states–Featuring evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental changes that support direct education and social marketing and ways to evaluate them across various settings. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 52 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help states improve the likelihood that individuals with low incomes will make healthy food choices within a limited budget and choose physically active lifestyles consistent with current guidelines by providing nutrition education and obesity prevention services, using interventions that include direct education; social marketing; and policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) changes. Contents include evidence-based obesity prevention programs and PSE strategies and interventions that states can use in their plans to comply with the requirement that plans include multi-level interventions or public health approaches. The toolkit includes a section on evaluation of interventions that may be considered along with evaluation recommendations and requirements.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Centers of Excellence, Southern Region at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2016. SNAP-Ed toolkit: Obesity prevention interventions and evaluation framework. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource is designed to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) implementing agencies find evidence-based obesity prevention and policy, systems, and environmental change (PSE) interventions and learn about outcome indicators from the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. A glossary of terms from the framework is also included. An online resource center for state and local SNAP-Ed providers and a library for locating SNAP-Ed tools and resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Training, Weight management

Jones W, Lao S, Lilly S, Waters A. 2015. Evaluation of the Carol M. White Physical Education Program: Final report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service, 95 pp.

Annotation: This report examines how the Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) projects were administered and implemented under revised regulations to align relevant program objectives with the Let's Move! Initiative. The report focuses on projects funded by fiscal year 2010 grant awards, the first cohort of grantees to implement projects under the revised PEP. Contents include a program overview, study purpose and design, a description of PEP projects, project implementation, new PEP priorities, project challenges, and summary and lessons learned. Topics include the role of community partnerships and grantee experiences with collecting and using body mass index data.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, Policy and Program Studies Service, Washington, DC Web Site: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/opepd/ppss/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Prevention programs, Body height, Body weight, Data collection, Federal grants, Federal programs, Grants management, Measures, Obesity, Physical education, Program evaluation, Public private partnerships

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015. Dietary guidelines for Americans 2015–2020 (8th ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture,

Annotation: These guidelines, published every five years, are designed for professionals to help all individuals ages 2 and older and their families to consume a healthy, nutritionally adequate diet. The document discusses key elements of healthy eating patterns, shifts needed to align with healthy eating patterns, and roles of everyone in supporting healthy eating patterns.

Keywords: Behavior, Environmental factors, Food consumption, Food safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, Weight management

Children's Hospital Association. 2014. 2013 survey findings of children's hospitals: Obesity services. Washington, DC: Children's Hospital Association, 36 pp.

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Effective Health Care Program. 2013, 2014. Keeping children at a healthy weight: A review of the research on ways to avoid becoming overweight or obese. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 13 pp.

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2013. My bright future: Physical activity and healthy eating—For adolescent girls and young women (upd.). [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 15 pp. (Bright futures for women's health and wellness)

Annotation: This booklet is designed to help adolescent girls and young women learn more about the importance of physical activity and healthy eating in their daily lives. It also offers advice to help girls and young women identify areas for improvement and set and reach their health goals. The booklet provides ideas on how to start a conversation with health professionals and examples of questions to ask, a section for the health professional to fill out during a visit, a goal-setting chart for girls and young women to use with their health professional or on their own, information on why physical activity and nutrition are important for girls and young women, and tips to help them reach their goals. A wallet card is also available.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Consumer education materials, Food habits, Goals, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight management, Women's health, Young adults

Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board and National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. 2013. Guidelines on weight gain and pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 20 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines on weight gain for women who are pregnant or who may become pregnant are based on the recommendations published in 2009 by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. They explain the importance of beginning pregnancy at a healthy weight; gaining the right amount of weight during pregnancy; and returning to a healthy weight after your baby is born. Included is a list of things women can do to ensure healthy weight gain during pregnancy.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-27234-6.

Keywords: Body weight, Consumer education materials, Gestational weight gain, Guidelines, Infant health, Maternal health, Obesity, Pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Weight gain, Weight management

Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board and National Research Council. 2013. Implementing guidelines on weight gain and pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 20 pp.

Annotation: This booklet for health professionals highlights key points from the new guidelines on weight gain and pregnancy published in 2009 by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council. Based on evidence that a woman's health and weight before pregnancy and after delivery are just as important as her health and weight during pregnancy, the booklet explains that beginning pregnancy at a healthy weight is key; that some weight gain during pregnancy (but not too much) is important; and that returning to a healthy weight after pregnancy will help set the stage for a healthy future pregnancy. A list of things that health professionals can do to help their patients achieve a healthy pregnancy is included.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-27239-1.

Keywords: Body weight, Gestational weight gain, Guidelines, Infant health, Maternal health, Obesity, Pregnancy, Pregnancy outcome, Weight gain, Weight management

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, . 2013. Promoting healthy weight: The role of Title V. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights how state maternal and child health (MCH) programs are working to promote healthy weight in their states and communities by presenting an environmental scan of activities and snapshots of comprehensive state efforts. It provides an overview of Title V programs and highlights the most frequently userd strategies to address weight issues that states described in their MCH Block Grant narratives. The strategies include health promotion, education, and training efforts; data monitoring, surveillance, and evaluation; increasing collaborations and partnerships; developing and implementing policies and guidelines; and capacity and systems building. Snapshots feature one state from each of the 10 Health Resources and Services Administration regions to show the breadth of activities and roles for Title V program involvement. A list of resources is also included.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Body weight, Collaboration, Community programs, Education, Health promotion, MCH programs, Obesity, Program evaluation, Public policy, State programs, Statistical data, Title V programs, Training, Weight management

Whitt-Glover MC, Porter AT, Yancey TK, Alexander RC, Creecy JM. 2013. Do short physical activity breaks in classrooms work?. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation; San Diego, CA: Active Living Research, 9 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes research on how programs that provide physical classroom activity breaks impact students' physical activity levels, on-task behavior, and other health outcomes. Barriers to providing physical activity breaks during the school day are discussed. The brief also includes a list of school physical activity programs with a brief description of each.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child behavior, Child health, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Programs, Research, School health, Weight management

Johns Hopkins University Evidence-Based Practice Center. 2013. Childhood obesity prevention programs: Comparative effectiveness review and meta-analysis. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ca. 835 pp. (Comparative effectiveness review; no. 115)

Annotation: This report describes research conducted by the Johns Hopkins University Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC) on the effectiveness of childhood obesity prevention programs by reviewing all interventional studies that aimed to improve diet, physical activity, or both and that were conducted in schools, homes, primary care clinics, childcare settings, the community, or combinations of these settings in high-income countries. Topics include optimal setting for childhood obesity prevention interventions, benefits and unwanted consequences of the study, and comparisons to what is already known. An executive summary, research protocol, slide presentation, continuing medical education activity, and summaries for clinicians and consumers (English and Spanish) are also available.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No.13-EHC081-EF.

Keywords: , Child health, Children, Obesity, Research reviews, School based programs, Weight management

Rodgers AB, Yaktine AL; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Implementation of the IOM Pregnancy Weight Gain Guidelines and National Research Council. 2013. Leveraging action to support dissemination of pregnancy weight gain guidelines: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 85 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a March 2013 workshop to discuss issues related to encouraging behavior change that would reflect updated guidelines on weight gain during pregnancy, such as charting weight gain during pregnancy, improving choices concerning nutrition and physical activity, and receiving adequate pre- or post-conception advice about weight and pregnancy weight gain. Contents include communicating the pregnancy weight gain guidelines, discussing efforts to support behavior change, implementing the guidelines, reviewing the First Thousand Days Program, and collaborating for action, as well as final thoughts. Appendices include the workshop agenda, list of participants, speaker biographies, and the workshop statement of task.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-28966-5.

Keywords: Gestational weight gain, Guidelines, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight management, Postnatal care, Preconception care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Resources for professionals

Salud America! The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Research Network to Prevent Obesity Among Latino Children. 2013. Salud America! . [San Antonio, TX]: Salud America! The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) Research Network to Prevent Obesity Among Latino Children,

Annotation: This web site describes a national online network of researchers, community group leaders, decision-makers, and members of the public to support healthy policy and environmental changes that can help reverse the Latino childhood obesity epidemic. It provides news, research, maps, videos, resources, and successful stories of change in Latino communities across the nation. Topics as they relate to Latino childhood obesity include promoting healthier food in choices in schools and neighborhoods, increasing access to local places and more opportunities to be active, decreasing unhealthy food and beverage advertising, and reducing consumption of sugary drinks.

Contact: Salud America!, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Institute for Health Promotion Research, 7411 John Smith, Suite 1000, San Antonio, TX 78229, Telephone: (210) 562-6500 Fax: (210) 562-6545 E-mail: saludamerica@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://salud-america.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Health behavior, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Policy development, Social change, Weight management

The Arc of New Jersey, Mainstreaming Medical Care. 2012. Prevent, understand, and live with diabetes: A guide for individuals with developmental disabilities. North Brunswick, NJ: The Arc of New Jersey, Mainstreaming Medical Care, ca. 65 pp.

Annotation: This guide assists those with intellectual disabilities in preventing and managing Type 2 diabetes by defining the condition and offering advice on prevention. It discusses the importance of getting tested early for diabetes, the role of exercise, healthy weight, and healthy foods in preventing diabetes; understanding the warning signs and blood sugar testing; and how stress, oral health, and visits to the doctor help with the control and monitoring of the disease. This publication is in English and Spanish.

Contact: The Arc of New Jersey, 985 Livingston Avennue, North Brunswick, NJ 08902, Telephone: (732) 246-2525 Fax: (732) 214-1834 E-mail: info@arcnj.org Web Site: http//www.arcnj.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Disease prevention, Exercise, Health promotion, Low literacy materials, Nutrition, Physical activity, Spanish language materials, Weight management

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.