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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (20 total).

David R. 2007. Inequality matters: Infant mortality in the global village. Washington, DC: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies Health Policy Institute, 14 pp.

Annotation: This background paper seeks to expand understanding of the causes and effects of infant mortality within a broader global context. It compares other nations across the globe, examining the impact of social and economic inequalities on population health and infant mortality. Contents include how inequalities and health are related, learning from participatory human relationships, case studies, inequality and economic health, structural violence and human suffering and dying, and pragmatic solidarity and public policy. References conclude the paper.

Contact: Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, 805 15th Street, 2nd Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 789-3500 Fax: (202) 789-6390 E-mail: general@jointcenter.org Web Site: http://www.jointcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant mortality, International health, Low income groups, Poverty, Socioeconomic factors, War

Berman S, Diener S, Dieringer L, Lantieri L. 2003. Talking with children about war and violence in the world. Cambridge, MA: Educators for Social Responsibility, 28 pp.

Annotation: This guide explores questions that parents and teachers ask about ways to have discussions with children about events such as war, terrorism, and military involvement in distant lands. The guide covers listening to students, responding to students' concerns, and teaching for understanding and promoting positive action. The appendix lists essential questions about the war with Iraq.

Contact: Educators for Social Responsibility, 23 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 492-1764 Secondary Telephone: (800) 370-2515 Fax: (617) 864-5164 E-mail: educators@esrnational.org Web Site: http://www.esrnational.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Parent education, Violence, War

Goodman RF, Gurian A, ed. 2002. Caring for kids after trauma and death: A guide for parents and health professionals. New York, NY: Institute for Trauma and Stress, New York University Child Study Center, 57 pp.

Annotation: This guide describes how children grieve at different ages and the specific ways that teachers, mental health professionals, and parents can help them with the immediate and ongoing tasks of grieving. The guide is divided into the following sections: (1) essential information, (2) guidelines for schools, (3) guidelines for mental health professionals, (4) guidelines for parents, (5) children, trauma, and death, (6) mental health, (7) adults, trauma, and death, (8) special topics, and (9) information in Spanish. The guide includes practical tips and specific concepts and issues.The guide contains two appendices: (1) references and (2) books for children, adolescents, parents, and professionals on bereavement; trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder; anxiety disorders; depression; and war, terrorism, and tolerance.The guide as available in English and Spanish.

Contact: New York University Child Study Center, 577 First Avenue, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 263-6622 E-mail: research@AboutOurKids.org Web Site: http://www.aboutourkids.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Anxiety, Bereavement, Children, Death, Depression, Emotional trauma, Grief, Mental health, Parents, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Resource materials, Spanish language materials, Terrorism, War

Schwartz DF, ed. 1992. Children and violence. Columbus, OH: Ross Laboratories, 130 pp. (Report of the Twenty-third Ross Roundtable on Critical Approaches to Common Pediatric Problems)

Annotation: This session of the Ross Roundtable was convened to explore some roles in helping children deal with the violence in their lives. These roles typically could be played by the professionals who care for children's health e.g. pediatricians. Presented were broad themes and issues that cut across the entire experience of children and violence. Subjects of discussion include firearms; and gang, urban, rural, domestic, and media violence. The conference was seen as a first discussion for pediatricians of the impact of violence and possible interventions. The Roundtable hopes to revisit these issues.

Contact: Ross Laboratories, Consumer Relations, 625 Cleveland Avenue, Columbus, OH 43215-1724, Telephone: (800) 227-5767 Secondary Telephone: (614) 624-7485 Contact Phone: (614) 227-3333 Web Site: http://www.ross.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Children, Counseling, Data, Domestic violence, Firearms, Gangs, Health professionals, Homicide, Hospitals, Injuries, Intervention, Media violence, Pediatricians, Prevention, Rural population, Urban population, Violence, War, Witnesses

Ross Conference on Pediatric Research (43rd: 1962: New York, NY). 1963. Medical responsibilities for the displaced child. Columbus, OH: Ross Laboratories, 67 pp. (Report of the Forty-third Ross Conference on Pediatric Research)

Annotation: This conference report discusses the medical needs of the displaced child, medical care of children in the public welfare population, the role of a multidisciplinary team in such care, the medical needs and responsibilities for children of migrants, seasonal farm workers' children in California, children during war or civil disaster, the child in the Aid to Dependent Children Program, children in adoption, children with one parent, the displaced retarded child, children in hospitals, children in convalescent homes, and children in child care programs. The role of social services for the displaced child is also discussed.

Keywords: Adoption, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, California, Child care, Child health services, Child welfare, Conferences, Disasters, Hospitalization, Mental retardation, Migrant health, Single parents, Social services, War

Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization, Interim Commission Joint Committee on Child Nutrition. 1947. Report on child nutrition. [Lake Success, NY: International Children's Emergency Fund?], 15 pp.

Annotation: In this report, the Joint Committee on Child Nutrition, created by the International Children' Emergency Fund of the United Nations, deals with the following issues: (1) the basic principles of nutrition in planning the purchase and distribution of foodstuffs in the development of feeding programs for pregnant women and nursing mothers, infants, preschool- and school-age children, and adolescents; (2) the use of dried whole milk, dried skim milk, and cheese in the fund's operations, and the relative cost of equivalent nutrients in those various forms of milk and milk products, (3) the value, in the fund's operations, of the provision of vitamin-containing foods compared with that of multi-vitamin and mineral preparations alone, (4) recommendations about meals for preschool- and school-age children, and (5) the relative value of a hot cooked meal vs. a cold meal. Th report includes the following main sections: (1) the general condition of children in war-stricken countries of Europe and China, (2) principles of child nutrition, (3) recommendations, and (4) concluding statement. One appendix contains recommendations on calories and specific nutrients. The report concludes with a list of committee members.

Keywords: Adolescent nutrition, Breastfeeding, Calories, Child nutrition, Child nutrition programs, Costs, Infant nutrition, Infant nutrition programs, International health, Maternal nutrition, Menu planning, Nutrients, Nutrition, Nutritional requirements, Pregnancy, Vitamin deficiencies, Vitamin supplements, Vitamins, War

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1945. Services for unmarried mothers and their children. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 17 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau))

Annotation: This joint statement on services for unmarried mothers and their children was prepared by the Children's Bureau, the Bureau of Public Assistance of the Social Security Board, and the American Red Cross. The purpose of the material is to encourage further coordinated planning by states and local communities for the fullest use of all services and facilities and to stimulate the provision of needed resources. Topics include illegitimacy as a problem accentuated by wartime conditions, needs to be met, services that should be available, planning to meet needs, and resources available to local communities. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Military, Prenatal influences, Reports, Single mothers, Social services, Social support, Socioeconomic factors, War

National Research Council, Committee on Nutrition in Industry. 1942. The food and nutrition of industrial workers in wartime. Washington, DC: National Research Council, 17 pp. (Reprint and circular series; no. 110)

Annotation: This pamphlet aims to encourage proper attention to the nutrition of defense workers, so the improved health and morale which results may speed production of the material needed in modern warfare. It discusses the critical situation of defense workers, dietary deficiencies widespread among workers' families, the British experience with recruits and factory workers, nutrition and industrial health practices, practical considerations for industries interested in the nutritional health of their employees, and recommendations.

Keywords: Industry, Nutrition, War, Work force

League of Nations, Economic Intelligence Service. 1942. Wartime rationing and consumption. Geneva, Switzerland: League of Nations, 87 pp.

Annotation: This study examines the impact of war controls and rationing on consumption and standards of living in countries involved in World War II for which information is available. It covers these topics: (1) consumption control in war economy; (2) food rationing and consumption; (3) rationing of goods other than food; and (4) general estimates of consumers' expenditure.

Keywords: Consumers, Economic factors, Expenditures, Food consumption, International health, Resource allocation, War

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1942. Toys in wartime: Suggestions to parents on making toys in wartime. Washington, DC: U.S. Children's Bureau, 44 pp. (not found by site search 5/24/12)

Annotation: This document contains suggestions and instruction on how to create toys for children with items from around the kitchen and house, to reduce new toy consumption and reduce the consumption of materials needed to manufacture war related goods.

Contact: Internet Archive, 300 Funston Ave., San Francisco, CA 94118, Telephone: (415) 561-6767 Fax: (415) 840-0391 E-mail: info@archive.org Web Site: http://www.archive.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Play, Toys, War

Nelson E . 1933. Women at work: A century of industrial change. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 51 pp. ([Women's Bureau publication])

Mendenhall DR. 1926. Milk: The indispensable food for children. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 43 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 35 (1918 ed.), no. 163 (1926 ed.); Care of children series; no. 4 (1918 ed.))

Annotation: This publication provides information on the critical importance of milk for the normal healthy development of infants and children, and for pregnant women and nursing mothers. The nature and value of milk as a food, and information on breast milk and on the purchasing and preparation of milk for infants, are included. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant nutrition, Milk, Reports, War

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1920. Children's year: A brief summary of work done and suggestions for follow-up work. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 20 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 67; Children's year follow-up series; no. 4)

Annotation: This document provides an overview of the Children's Year Campaign, inaugurated in 1918, the results of that campaign, and the plan for follow up activities. Topics include: implementation of the Weighing and Measuring Test, the Recreation drive, and the Back-to-School drive; the conference on child welfare standards; and the protection of maternity, infancy, working children, and children born out of wedlock. Follow up plans cover these topics: better birth registration, the establishment of health stations, public provision of recreation, community study of local needs and resources, and study of present laws and standards of child welfare. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Body height, Body weight, Child labor, Child welfare, Children, Recreation, School attendance, War

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1919. Back-to-school drive. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 8 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 49; Children's year leaflet ; no. 7)

Annotation: This monograph addresses the problem of the increasing number of children leaving school for work as a result of World War I. The reasons why this is bad for the children (Premature work means a sacrifice of education, of health, and, as a result, of future earning capacity) and the country (opportunities for untrained workers will diminish after the war), as well as unnecessary (child labor is not needed for the war effort) are presented. The negative consequences of child labor in France and England are reviewed. A Back-to-School Drive that seeks better enforcement of the child labor and compulsory education laws is recommended. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child labor, School attendance, War

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1918. Juvenile delinquency in certain countries at war: A brief review of available foreign sources. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 28 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 39; Dependent, defective, and delinquent classes series; no. 5)

Annotation: This monograph summarizes available material about child welfare and juvenile delinquency in countries at war, including England, France, Germany, Italy, and Russia. Topics covered include the effects of war upon children's behavior, reasons for the increase in juvenile delinquency during wartime, and suggested measures for communities to take to prevent and treat juvenile delinquency. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Google Books, Web Site: http://www.books.google.com

Keywords: Child welfare, Juvenile delinquency, Reports, War

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1918. Children's year working program . Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 12 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 40; Children's year leaflet; no. 3)

Annotation: This monograph outlines the program for Children's Year in 5 broad areas: (1) public protection of mothers, infants, and young children (infant welfare, child health, education of mothers); (2) home care and income (housing and sanitation, special needs of older children, family income); (3) child labor and school attendance; (4) recreation; and (5) children in need of special care (dependent and neglected children, physically and mentally handicapped children, delinquent children). The aim, community questions to assess need, and suggested activities are provided for each area. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child labor, Child welfare, Children, Children with special health care needs, Disabilities, Family income, Foster care, Housing, Infant health, Juvenile delinquency, MCH programs, Mothers, Parent education, Preschool children, Recreation, Sanitation, School attendance, War

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1918. Children's health centers. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 7 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 45; Children's year leaflet; no. 5)

Annotation: This circular was prepared to provide information on how to establish a children's health center. The centers, staffed by a physician and public health nurse, "keep well children well" by providing information to mothers on child care and prenatal care. Ill children are referred to a family physician or hospital. Guidelines regarding staff, location, size, equipment, cost, and child care literature are provided. Suggestions for establishing children's health centers in rural as well as industrial areas are included. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child health services, Prevention programs, War, Well child clinics

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1918. Save 100,000 babies: Get a square deal for children. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 8 pp. (Bureau publication; no. 36; Children's year leaflet; no. 1)

Annotation: This monograph sets out the agenda prepared by the Children's Bureau for Children's Year April 6, 1918–April 6, 1919 (the second year of World War I). Noting that warring countries have learned that national security requires the protection of children, the program identifies five areas of work. These include: (1) public protection of mothers, infants, and young children with emphasis placed on public-health nursing and on a nation-wide weighing and measuring test of young children; (2) home care and income with an emphasis on enabling mothers to care for their own children at home with an income sufficient for family needs, instead of going out to help in earning their children's daily bread; 3) child labor and education with an emphasis on the continued enforcement of federal child-labor laws, even in war-time; (4) recreation, with an emphasis on maintaining and developing recreation opportunities for children and young people to avoid delinquency; and (5) children in need of special care, with an emphasis on community action to provide supervision and guidance for dependent children. A list of Children's Year materials produced by the Children's Bureau to support implementation of activities is provided. The monograph is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child labor, Child welfare, Education, Federal MCH programs, Pamphlets, Recreation, War

Wolfe SH. 1917. Governmental provisions in the United States and foreign countries for members of the military forces and their dependents. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 236 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 28; Miscellaneous series; no. 11)

Rochester A. 1917. Child labor in warring countries: A brief review of foreign reports. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 75 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 27; Industrial series; no.4)

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.