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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 13 (13 total).

Illinois State Board of Education, Data Analysis Division. 2015. Dental examination compliance status of kindergarten, second, and sixth grade children in Illinois for school year 2013–2014. Springfield, IL: Illinois State Board of Education, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes statewide dental examination compliance and oral health status of children in kindergarten and second and sixth grades in Illinois. Contents include findings on the level of compliance and noncompliance for all students, public school students, and non- public-school students. Compliance and health- status data are reported for the state as a whole, by county, and by grade level. The report also discusses implications of the data across the state.

Contact: Illinois State Board of Education, 100 N. First Street, Springfield, IL 62777, Telephone: (217) 782-4321 Secondary Telephone: (866) 262-6663 Web Site: https://www.isbe.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Compliance, Data, Dental care, Dental sealants, Health examinations, Health status, Illinois, Oral health, School age children, School districts, Schools, State legislation, State surveys, Waivers

Shirk C. 2008. Shaping Medicaid and SCHIP through waivers: The fundamentals. Washington, DC: National Health Policy Forum, 32 pp. (Background paper no. 64)

Annotation: This paper reviews the statutory basis and mechanics of demonstrations and program waivers, as well as their history and political context in shaping Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program. It also explores the ways the changing state-federal relationship and the ever-growing demand for state flexibility have driven waiver policy and examines the impact of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 on the need for or desirability of waivers.

Contact: National Health Policy Forum, George Washington University, 2131 K Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 872-1390 E-mail: nhpf@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.nhpf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Health care financing, Medicaid, State Children’s Health Insurance Program, State programs, Waivers

Artiga S, Mann C. 2007. Family coverage under SCHIP waivers. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 16 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines 11 State Children's Health Insurance Programs (SCHIPs) that cover parents as well as children. The paper discusses (1) the federal SCHIP waiver policy (which allows states to use SCHIP funds in ways that are not otherwise permitted by law); (2) why states sought to cover parents with SCHIP waivers; (3) eligibilty; enrollment, and benefits under SCHIP parent waivers; (4) spending under SCHIP waiviers; and (5) impact of SCHIP parent waiver coverage. A conclusion and endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the paper.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Eligibility, Enrollment, Low income groups, Parents, Public policy:, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Waiver programs, Waivers

Alker J. 2005. Premium assistance programs: How are they financed and do they save money?. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 16 pp. (Issue paper)

Annotation: This brief examines premium assistance programs implemented under section 1115 waivers in five states (Illinois, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Utah) to determine how they are financed; their eligibility, benefits, and cost-sharing requirements; their methods for determining cost-effectiveness, and cost savings. (Premium assistance programs use federal and state Medicaid and/or State Children's Health Insurance Program funds to subsidize the purchase of private health insurance and may also use employer or enrollee contributions to help pay premium costs.) The brief, which includes an executive summary, provides background, discusses findings, and provides a discussion. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the brief. The brief includes a list of sources.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Cost sharing, Eligibility, Financing, Health insurance, Illinois, Low income groups, Medicaid, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Utah, Waivers

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2004. SCHIP: HHS continues to approve waivers that are inconsistent with program goals. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report updates an earlier General Accounting Office analysis of states' Health Insurance and Flexibility and Accounting Initiative (HIFA) waiver proposals reviewed and approved by the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) after July 2002. This report provides information on DHHS's approval of states' proposals to use State Children's Health Insurance Program funds to extend health insurance coverage to childless and other groups of adults, including whether such proposals were subject to a cost-effectiveness test, and outline the status of other HIFA waiver applications that DHHS has reviewed by not approved. Some information is presented in tables throughout the report.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-04-166R.

Keywords: Cost effectiveness, Health insurance, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Waivers

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2002. Medicaid and SCHIP: Recent HHS approvals of demonstration waiver projects raise concerns. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report to the U.S. Senate Committee on Finance discusses a review of Social Security Act section 1115 waiver requests by states to modify Medicaid and the State Childrens Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). Topics of the review were (1) types of waiver proposals that have been submitted and approved; (2) whether the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has ensured that the approved waivers are consistent with the goals and fiscal integrity of Medicaid and SCHIP; and (3) the extent to which there has been opportunity for public input into the expedited process. The report offers recommendations for Congressional and executive action, agency and state comments about the review, and the General Accounting Office's (GAO)evaluation. The appendices include descriptions of four recent Section 1115 waiver approvals; waiver applications under review; the response of the HHS General Counsel's Office and HHS; comments from the states of Arizona, Illinois, and Utah, along with GAO contact and staff information.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-02-817.

Keywords: Arizona, California, Federal programs, Health insurance, Illinois, Medicaid, State children's health insurance program, State programs, Utah, Waivers

Florida Department of Health. 2000-. Healthy Start: Annual report. Tallahassee, FL: Healthy Start, Florida Department of Health Office of Maternal and Child Health, annual.

Annotation: This annual report describes the Florida Healthy Start program. In addition to an executive summary and a description of legislative requirements, the report discusses the following topics: (1) Healthy Start coalitions, (2) the Healthy Start Medicaid Waiver, (3) families at risk, (4) families receiving services, (5) risk factors, (6) future directions, (7) and how people can help. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report.

Contact: Florida Department of Health, Infant, Maternal & Reproductive Health Unit, Healthy Start, HSFFM, Bin A-13, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Tallahassee, FL 32399-1723, Telephone: (850) 245-4465 Fax: (850) 245-4047 Web Site: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/family/mch/hs/hs.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Families, Florida, Healthy Start, High risk groups, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Medicaid, Prevention programs, Risk factors, Waivers

Richardson J, House S. 1999, n.d.. Federal programs for children and families: A tool for connecting programs to people. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service; IEL Policy Exchange, 217 pp. (A CRS report to Congress; Special report no. 15)

Annotation: This report provides (1) a brief description of approximately 140 federally funded programs directed specifically toward children and their families, as well as the programs' tax rules, (2) federal funding amounts, (3) participation data, (4) information about how the program/tax rule is targeted, (5) selected program characteristics such as entitlement status, whether features of the program are indexed, matching requirements, and whether major waivers or federal rules are allowed, and (6) Congressional committee involvement. Programs are grouped into the following categories: education and training, health, housing, income support, nutrition, and social services. Tables at the end of each section summarize selected information about the programs and tax rules described in the section. The report concludes with copies of two letters requesting the report, and a list of credits. It was originally published by the Congressional Research Service in 1999 and republished by IEL under a different title.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 2008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: iel@iel.org Web Site: http://www.iel.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Data, Entitlements, Families, Federal programs, Financing, Health, Housing, Nutrition, Participation, Social services, Taxes, Training, Waivers

Mitchell E. 1996. A legislator's guide to Medicaid waivers: Tools for Medicaid reform. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 35 pp.

Hill I, Schwalberg R, Chait E. 1995. Delivering and financing services for children with special health care needs under managed care: Design options for Vermont officials. Washington, DC: Health Systems Research, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report is the product of a technical assistance project to the Vermont Department of Health. The report gives information on choices which can be made in designing health care financing and service for children with special health needs using a Section 1115 waiver. The report includes information on other states' programs under the waiver option, and considers the advantages and disadvantages of several options. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Altarum Institute, 3520 Green Court, Suite 300, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, Telephone: (734) 302-4600 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-6505 Fax: (734) 302-4991 Web Site: http://www.altarum.org/contact Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Health care delivery, Health care financing, Managed care, Medicaid managed care, State health care reform, Vermont, Waivers

Fox HB, Nadash P, McManus MA, Wicks LB. 1994. A preliminary examination of state Medicaid waiver programs and children with special health needs. Washington, DC: Fox Health Policy Consultants, 66 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to examine the likely impact of Medicaid programs on children with special health care needs by looking at four states that have had waiver applications approved and are currently implementing demonstration programs—Hawaii, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. It also considers the likely impact of waiver programs on the major publicly funded programs with responsibility for special needs children—state programs for children with special health care needs (CSHN). Following an introduction on the concept of waivers and demonstration programs, the report is divided into three other chapters. Chapter 2 describes demonstrations of waiver programs in the four states and assesses the impact of the programs on children with special health care needs. Chapter 3 contains an analysis of the ways in which the four programs have affected, or are likely to affect, the CSHN programs in those states. Chapter 4 provides a summary of the findings and offers suggestions regarding the issues that states might want to consider in planning future waiver programs and the new roles and responsibilities that CSHN programs adopt in waiver program states. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Policy Research Center, 750 17th Street, N.W., Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20006-4607, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 496-9067 E-mail: mmcmanus@mchpolicy.org Web Site: http://www.mchpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children with special health care needs, Demonstration programs, Hawaii, Health care financing, Health care reform, Medicaid managed care, Oregon, Rhode Island, Service delivery systems, State CSHCN programs, Tennessee, Waivers

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1989. Health care: Nine states' experiences with home care waivers. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the experience of nine states in applying for, renewing, and administering Medicaid waivers to permit payment for home care provided to chronically ill children, including difficulties experienced and levels of satisfaction.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HRD-89-95.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Home care, Medicaid, State programs, Waivers

Fox HB, with Yoshpe R. 1986. Technology-dependent children's access to Medicaid home care financing. Washington, DC: Fox Health Policy Consultants, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the opportunities that technology-dependent children have for obtaining home care coverage under the Medicaid program. It is divided into four sections that provide information on: 1) the four basic Medicaid options available for financing technology-dependent children (regular waivers, model waivers, Katie Beckett waivers, and state plan amendments), 2) the current level of state activity in each of the options, 3) state policies and practices that limit the number of severely disabled children able to participate in the Medicaid home care program options, and 4) the Medicaid and Crippled Children's Services (CSS) financing opportunities that would be available in five states for three hypothetical technology-dependent children.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Policy Research Center, 750 17th Street, N.W., Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20006-4607, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 496-9067 E-mail: mmcmanus@mchpolicy.org Web Site: http://www.mchpolicy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children with special health care needs, Financing, Home care services, Medicaid, Technology dependence, Waivers

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.