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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 18 (18 total).

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. Pathways to family leadership within AMCHP. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document defines the term "family leader" and describes the roles for family leaders in the Association for Maternal and Child Health Programs' activities. Topics include title, eligibility criteria, selection process, timeline, and duties.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Contact Phone: (202) 775-1472 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Contact E-mail: mjarvix@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community participation, Consultants, Employment, Families, Leadership, Mentors, Parent participation, Parent professional relations, Public private partnerships, Recruitment, Special health care services, State MCH programs, Teaching, Technical assistance, Title V programs, Training, Volunteers, Work force

National Association of County and City Health Officials, Division of the Civilian Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps. 2014. Stronger together: A national network of volunteers--The 2013 network profile of the Medical Reserve Corps. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 39 pp.

White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. [2011]. Partnerships for the common good: A partnership guide for faith-based and neighborhood organizations. Washington, DC: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, 71 pp.

Annotation: This guide. which is geared toward local faith and community leaders, presents opportunities to form partnerships with Centers for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships across government, as well as information about how to apply for federal grants and access capacity-building resources. The guide addresses the following issue areas: adoption, disasters, education, responsible fatherhood, environmentally friendly buildings, healthy children and families, housing opportunities, hunger and nutrition, international relief and development, jobs, veterans and military families, and volunteerism.

Contact: White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Telephone: (202) 456-3394 E-mail: whpartnerships@who.eop.gov Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ofbnp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adoption, Child health, Collaboration, Communities, Disaster planning, Education, Employment, Environment, Families, Fathers, Federal programs, Grants, Housing, Hunger, International health, Manuals, Military, Nutrition, Religious organizations, Volunteers

Volunteers in Health Care. [2003]. Creating a volunteer-dental van project. Pawtucket, RI: Volunteers in Health Care, 2 v. (Field report)

Annotation: These field reports present examples of how to use public-private partnerships to create or expand a volunteer dental van project. Two dental van projects are discussed: Kids in Need of Dentistry—"Miles for Smiles" of Denver, Colorado; and Northwest Medical Teams International of Portland, Oregon. Each report provides a project description and discussions of the first steps in delivering service, securing funding, providing governance, organizing operations, determining patient eligibility, and recruiting volunteers.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Colorado, Dental clinics, Families, Guidelines, Oral health, Oregon, Public private partnerships, Volunteers

Washington State Department of Health, Adolescent Health Transition Project. 2003. Working together for successful transition: Washington State adolescent transition resource notebook. Olympia, WA: Adolescent Health Transition Project, Washington State Department of Health, ca. 350 pp.

Annotation: This notebook is a resource on transition from adolescence to young adulthood for young adults with special health care needs and disabilities.The notebook is geared toward families, students, school personnel, community agency workers, health professionals, and other groups working with adolescents and young adults in Washington State. The notebook is organized into the following sections: (1) transition overview, (2) the student, (3) school, (4) post-secondary education, (5) work, volunteering, community participation, (6) division of vocational rehabilitation, (7) community resources, (8) recreation, (9) legal matters, (10) Division of Developmental Disabilities, (11) Supplemental Security Income, (12) health, and (13) transition stories. The notebook contains one appendix that includes information on multicultural and translated resources, acronyms and definition, health insurance terms and definitions, sample forms, information on educational resources, and a transition guide for Washington State.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, Office of Maternal and Child Health, Children with Special Health Care Needs Program, P.O. Box 47835, Olympia, WA 98504-7835, Telephone: (360) 236-3571 E-mail: cshcn.support@doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Community participation, Developmental disabilities, Education, Health, Legislation, Recreation, School to work transition, Schools, Students, Supplemental security income, Transition to independent living, Vocational rehabilitation, Volunteers, Washington, Young adults, Youth

Hanson SH, Goldin GL. 2002. Recruiting and retaining dental volunteers: A Volunteers in Health Care guide. Pawtucket, RI: Volunteers in Health Care, 39 pp.

Annotation: This manual presents some of the challenges of creating an oral health program using volunteers and identifies approaches for recruiting and retaining volunteers. Chapter topics include an overview of the state of dentistry; motivations for volunteering; steps to complete before starting the recruitment process; methods for attracting, recruiting, and retaining volunteers; and tips to remember. The manual also contains sample recruitment letters and provider agreements and a list of useful Web sites and readings.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental care, Health services delivery, Oral health, Program development, Recruitment, Voluntary health agencies, Volunteers

Dutton M, Katz S, Pennington A. 2000. Using community groups and student volunteers to enroll uninsured children in Medicaid and Child Health Plus. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 15 pp. (Field report)

Skigen C, Switzer-Nadasdi R, Schaefer, M. 2000. Starting a dental project using the clinic model. Pawtucket, RI: Volunteers in Health Care, 3 v. (Case study)

Annotation: These case studies present accounts of three organizations and their experiences in starting or expanding a dental project. The clinics described are the I. M. Sulzbacher Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida; the Interfaith Dental Clinic, Nashville, Tennessee; and the Harambee Dental Clinic, Madison, Wisconsin. The case studies discuss the genesis of the idea for each project, recruiting volunteers, and clinic operations.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Children, Dental clinics, Families, Florida, Oral health, Tennessee, Volunteers, Wisconsin

Wilson T, Wyman B, Hagenbruch J, Harrington K. 2000. Using a public-private partnership to create/expand a volunteer dental project. Pawtucket, RI: Volunteers in Health Care, 3 v. (Field report)

Annotation: These three field reports present examples of how to use public-private partnerships to create or expand a volunteer dental clinic. The reports are intended to be used as instructions for replicating the process. The clinics discussed are the Northern Virginia Dental Clinic, Falls Church, Virginia; the McHenry County Cooperative Dental Clinic, Woodstock, Illinois; and Share Our Selves, Costa Mesa, California. Each report provides a project description and discussions of first steps, convening the partnership, and sustaining the partnership.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , California, Children, Dental clinics, Families, Guidelines, Illinois, Oral health, Public private partnerships, Virginia, Volunteers

O'Connor S, Sanchez P, Stowasser BA. 2000. Planning space, equipment, supply and utility needs for a volunteer dental project. Pawtucket, RI: Volunteers in Health Care, 3 v. (Field report)

Annotation: These field reports present information about planning for the physical aspects of a volunteer dental clinic. The reports are intended to be used as instructions for replicating the project. Areas discussed are space, equipment, supplies, and utility needs. The clinics profiled are as follows: Inner City Health Center, Denver, Colorado; Los Angeles Free Clinic, Los Angeles, California; and St. Elizabeth of Hungary Clinic, Tucson, Arizona.

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, California, Children, Colorado, Dental clinics, Families, Guidelines, Oral health, Volunteers

Funkhouser JE, Gonzales MR. 1997, 1998r. Family involvement in children's education: Successful local approaches—An idea book. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, ca. 120 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes how some schools and their communities have overcome key barriers to strong partnerships for school improvement. Barriers discussed include finding time, increasing the information about other partners, bridging school family differences, improving schools, and tapping external supports to strengthen school-family partnerships. The manual is designed for school administrators, teachers, policymakers, and parents to help families become more active participants in their children's education.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: ISBN 0-16-049254-8.

Keywords: Barriers, Community role, Education, Educational attainment, Family school relations, Family support services, Literacy, Local initiatives, Model programs, Outreach, Parent participation, Safety, Teachers, Training, Volunteers

Tierney JP, Grossman JB, Resch NL. 1995. Making a difference: An impact study of Big Brothers/Big Sisters. Philadelphia, PA: Public/Private Ventures, 87 pp.

Annotation: This report is the centerpiece of an eight year research initiative to study mentoring and to explore the policy and operational implications of creating adult mentoring relationships for at-risk youth. A focus of the initiative was a case study of California's Big Brothers/Big Sisters mentoring program. Following an introduction describing the background of the study, Chapter 2 lays out in detail the infrastructure and standards in the BB/BS program. Chapter 3 describes the design of the evaluation. Chapter 4 describes the characteristics of youth who participated in the study. Chapter 5 then presents the evidence on how youth who participated in a BB/BS program differed, 18 months later, from similar youth assigned to a control group. The final chapter summarizes the positive impacts of BB/BS on youth, and then draws policy implications for and about mentoring programs. A bibliography is included at the end of the report.

Contact: Public/Private Ventures, 2000 Market Street, Suite 600, Philadelphia, PA 19103, Telephone: (215) 557-4400 Secondary Telephone: (215) 557-4411 Fax: (215) 557-4469 E-mail: publications@ppv.org Web Site: http://www.ppv.org Price unknown.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Case studies, Counselors, Data, High risk adolescents, Mentors, Research design, Research methodologies, Surveys, Volunteers

Freedman M. 1993. The kindness of strangers: Adult mentors, urban youth, and the new voluntarism. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Publishers , 162 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the issues and needs of voluntarism as a mechanism for helping inner-city youth grow away from poverty and community violence. It focuses specifically on adult mentors working with urban youth. Addressing President Clinton's call to action, the author explores what mentoring can accomplish, what a successful mentor is, and what makes a mentoring program effective. Based on interviews with over 300 mentors, young people, scholars, and youth workers, this book discusses how reinventing community can turn around the lives of high risk adolescents.

Contact: Jossey-Bass Publishers, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Corporate Headquarters, 111 River Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030, Telephone: (201) 748-6000 Fax: (201) 748-6088 E-mail: info@wiley.com Web Site: http://www.JosseyBass.com $24.95 plus $4.00 shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 1-55542-557-7.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Community service, Mentors, Urban population, Volunteers

Beck ML. 1988. Rural volunteer support systems for pregnant and parenting teens: A how to manual for case management programs. Nampa, ID: Terry Reilly Health Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes one rural area's experience in establishing a volunteer system of support for pregnant and parenting adolescents. It describes the program and discusses community needs assessment, developing community support, using an interagency coordinating task force, setting up a volunteer project, ongoing supervision of volunteers, support groups, and rural barriers to service. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Terry Reilly Health Services, 211 16th Avenue North, Nampa, ID 83653-0009, Telephone: (208) 467-4431 Fax: (208) 467-7684 Web Site: http://www.trhs.org/ Limited quantities available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent parents, Collaboration, Health services, Manuals, Pregnant adolescents, Volunteers

Taylor H, Kagay M, Ross J. 1988. A catalyst for action: A national survey to mobilize leadership and resources for the prevention of alcohol and other drug problems among American youth. New York, NY: Louis Harris and Associates, 78 pp.

Annotation: This report aims to help those who want to identify, generate, and mobilize community leadership and resources to prevent the use and abuse of alcohol and drugs by young people under age 18. The study is based on telephone interviews conducted in 1987 from national samples of 1,000 community leaders, 1,000 grant makers, and 100 national prevention experts. The report identifies current activities addressing the problem, prevention strategies, barriers in prevention efforts, sources of funding, and implications for action by the three specific groups.

Contact: Harris Interactive, 60 Corporate Woods, Rochester, NY 14623, Telephone: (585) 272-8400 Secondary Telephone: (800) 866-7655 E-mail: info@harrisinteractive.com Web Site: http://www.harrisinteractive.com/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Community based programs, Organizations, Prevention, Substance abuse, Volunteers, Youth

Davidson County (North Carolina) Health Department. 1988. The Davidson Project: Reducing risk factors associated with premature births—Training manual. Lexington, NC: Davidson County Health Department, ca. 75 pp.

Annotation: This manual was designed for volunteers in the Davidson project of reducing risk factors associated with premature births. The manual includes program policy guidelines; volunteer forms and job description; coordinator forms pertaining to volunteers; patient forms; a section on communication including excerpts on reality therapy and perceptual psychology, and information on parenting disorders; Davidson County Health Department services; and inserts on infant mortality, a risk assessment scoring sheet, preterm labor instructions for the patient, a guide to raising children, and photocopied articles on adolescent pregnancy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Davidson County Health Department, 915 Greensboro Street, Lexington, NC 27292, Telephone: (336) 242-2000 Web Site: http://www.dchdnc.com/

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Health services, High risk populations, High risk pregnancy, Mothers, Pregnancy outcome, Preterm birth, Psychology, Risk assessment, Socioeconomic factors, Training, Volunteers, Women

Scholtes P. 1985. Connecting volunteers with teenage parents: A good way to beat the odds. [No place], WI: Family Enhancement Program, 104 pp.

Southern Regional Health Forum (1974: Atlanta, GA). 1975. Report of the Southern Regional Health Forum, Atlanta, Georgia, September 8-10, 1974 on developing a community health care strategy for children and youth. New York, NY: National Health Council, 112 pp.

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.