Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (25 total).

American Optometric Association. n.d.. Ready for school: Understanding the difference between vision screenings and vision examinations. St. Louis, MO: American Optometric Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about the difference between vision screenings and vision examinations and explains why it is important for young children to receive comprehensive vision and eye examinations conducted by a doctor before they start school. The fact sheet explains the essential elements of a comprehensive eye examination used to ensure that learning is maximized through good vision.

Contact: American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, First Floor , St. Louis, MO 63141, Telephone: (314) 991-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 365-2219 Fax: (314) 991-4101 Web Site: http://www.aoanet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Consumer education materials, Eye diseases, Screening, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

Ruderman M. 2020. Children's vision and eye health: A snapshot of current national issues (2nd ed.). Chicago, IL: National Center for Children's Vision & Eye Health at Prevent Blindness, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report is a compilation of research, survey data, and best practices that outlines the landscape for children's vision and eye health in the United States. Contents include information about the prevalence and impact of vision disorders in U.S. children, receipt of vision screening for infants and children from birth through age 17, and state approaches to ensuring children's vision and eye health. Additional topics include vision screening rates and requirements by state, pediatric vision benefits available under the Affordable Care Act, what is included in a strong vision health system of care, and model children's vision legislation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Children, Costs, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health status, Policy development, Prevalence, Preventive health services, Primary care, Reimbursement, Research, Screening, Service integration, Standards, State programs, State surveys, Statistical data, Systems development, Vision, Vision disorders

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014. Use of selected clinical preventive services to improve the health of infants, children, and adolescents: United States, 1999–2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 63(2, Suppl.):1–107,

Annotation: This supplement to Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report examines the use of selected clinical preventive services for infants, children, and adolescents in the United States. Topics include breastfeeding counseling; screening for hearing loss and provision of follow-up services; screening for developmental delays, lead poisoning, vision impairment, and hypertension; vaccination against human papillomavirus; tobacco use and tobacco cessation counseling and medication; screening for chlamydia infection; and provision of reproductive health services. Additional topics include the potential benefits of selected services, the challenges related to their underuse, and effective collaborative strategies to improve use.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISSN 1546-0738.

Keywords: Adolescents, Breastfeeding, Children, Chlamydia infections, Clinics, Counseling, Developmental screening, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Hearing screening, Human papillomavirus, Hypertension, Infants, Lead poisoning screening, Oral health, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Reproductive health, Smoking cessation, Tobacco use, Vision screening

National Center for Medical Home Implementation, National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health. [2013]. The role of the medical home in vision and eye health: A fact sheet for medical professionals. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center for Medical Home Implementation, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for health professional provides information about the role the medical home plays in ensuring that children receive timely eye examinations; vision screenings; and, when necessary, eye examinations and treatment for vision conditions. The fact sheet discusses common eye problems in preschool-age children, the importance of educating families about vision milestones, guidelines for vision screening, and benefits of early vision screening and eye examinations in the medical home. Links to resources for more information are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Eye diseases, Families, Medical home, Resource materials, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. Vision development and the link to overall development in the premature infant. Alexandria, VA: National Premature Infant Health Coalition, (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 14)

Annotation: This webinar focuses on the most prevalent and significant issues involved in eye and vision care during the growth and development of premature infants. It discusses visual development, ocular growth in prematurity, and the condition known as retinopathy of prematurity resulting from the abnormal development of blood vessels. Autism warning signs which might manifest as visual cues (for example the lack of frequent eye contact by 2-3 months) are also presented. The webinar discusses the history of infant eye care and visual screening; the importance of early intervention; the various ways to test vision in infants; and the importance of addressing potential vision problems. An overview of InfantSEE -- a public health program designed to help ensure that eye and vision care becomes an integral part of infant wellness care -- is included as part of the presentation.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Community programs, Development, Growth, Infant health, Premature infants, Retinopathy of prematurity, Vision screening

California Health Benefits Review Program. 2012. Policy brief: Pediatric dental and pediatric vision essential health benefits. Oakland, CA: California Health Benefits Review Program, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief focuses on a subset of the health insurance market that is subject to essential health benefit (EHB) coverage requirements in California, nongrandfathered small-group and individual-market health service plans, and policies regulated by the California Department of Managed Care and the California Department of Insurance. Topics include tests, treatments, and services covered in the pediatric dental and pediatric vision EHB category; the age group eligible for pediatric dental coverage; and how stand-alone health insurance will be coordinated with stand-alone dental insurance to fulfill the pediatric EHB requirement.

Contact: California Health Benefits Review Program, University of California, Office of the President, 111 Franklin Street, 11th Floor, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 287-3876 E-mail: info@chbrp.org Web Site: http://www.chbrp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Children, Dental care, Health insurance, Medicaid, Oral health, State programs, Vision screening, Vision tests

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2011-. Visual impairment in children ages 1 to 5 years: Screening. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Infant Toddler Program. 2011. New Mexico vision screening tool. [Rev. ed.]. [Alamogordo, NM]: New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Infant Toddler Program, 5 pp.

Annotation: This tool is designed to help programs have a consistent method of screening vision for children in New Mexico. It discusses the importance of the parent interview, a medical history, examination tips, a brief review of behaviors often associated with visual impairment, developmental vision screening, and discussing observations during the exam. A form is provided for recording screening results, as well as a summary form for possible referral.

Contact: New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 1900 White Sands Boulevard, Alamogordo, NM 88310, Telephone: (575) 437-3505 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-3505 Fax: (575) 439-4411 Web Site: http://www.nmsbvi.k12.nm.us/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Forms, Medical history, Medical records, New Mexico, State programs, Vision screening

New York State Education Department. 2011. School vision screening guidelines. [Rev. ed.]. Albany, NY: New York State Education Department, 19 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides local educational agencies, administrators, and school health personnel in New York state with a framework for establishing the vision screening program required under New York State Education Law. It explains the purpose of vision screening in schools and provides guidelines for developing effective vision screening including planning, implementation, and follow-up procedures. Topics also include the New York legislative background, establishing priorities, and religious exemptions. A glossary, references, and sample forms are provided.

Contact: New York State Education Department, 89 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12234, Telephone: (518) 474-3852 Web Site: http://usny.nysed.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, New York, School age children, School health services, Screening, State programs, Vision

Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health Sensory Program. 2010. Recommended vision screening guidelines for children ages 3 and older. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health Sensory Program, 40 pp.

Annotation: These vision screening guidelines for children ages three and older provide an overview of the vision screening process and recommended guidelines in the state of Arizona. Descriptions of common vision problems; recommended screening tools; and guidelines on informing parents, preparing children, coordinating care, following up with families; and evaluating screening programs are included. An illustrated explanation of how vision works is also provided.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 150 N. 18th Ave., Suite 320, Phoenix, AZ 85007, Telephone: (602) 364-1400 Fax: (602) 364- 1495 E-mail: sjolans@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/owch/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Children, Guidelines, State programs, Vision screening

Prevent Blindness America. 2010. Our vision for children's vision: A national call to action for the advancement of children's vision and eye health. [Chicago, IL]: Prevent Blindness America, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a platform for children's vision and eye health. The report discusses the importance of professional eye health care and emphasizes the role of vision screening in eye care. Also addressed are the importance of ensuring that children are prepared to enter school unhampered by undetected vision problems; eye safety at home, at school, and at play; and advances in pediatric vision research. The report also acknowledges the importance of public awareness and understanding of children's vision and eye health.

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Eye care, Eye diseases, Eye injuries, Prevention, Research, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests

American Optometric Association. [2009]. Preschool vision: 2 to 5 years of age. St. Louis, MO: American Optometric Association, 3 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides information about vision in preschool-age children (ages 2-5). The brochure offers information on why good vision is important during this period and discusses signs of eye and vision problems, understanding the difference between a vision screening and a vision exam, and what parents can do to help with preschool vision development.

Contact: American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, First Floor , St. Louis, MO 63141, Telephone: (314) 991-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 365-2219 Fax: (314) 991-4101 Web Site: http://www.aoanet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Preschool children, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Adolescent Health Unit. 2009. Vision screening procedures for infancy, childhood and school age children. [Rev. ed.]. Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Adolescent Health Unit, 59 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines provide information about vision screening procedures for infants, young children, and school-age children in Minnesota. Topics include preparation, procedures, screening with technology, and web resources.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Division of Community and Family Health, MN Telephone: (651) 201-3589 E-mail: health.cfhcommunications@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/cfh Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, Infants, Minnesota, School age children, Technology, Vision screening, Young children

American Optometric Association. 2009. Ready for school: Could your child have a vision problem?. St. Louis, MO: American Optometric Association, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents of young children or school-age children provides guidance for how to determine whether a child may have a vision problem. The fact sheet offers a list of questions referring to young children and a list referring to school-age children that can help parents identify vision problems. The fact sheet also emphasizes the importance of regular eye examinations for children.

Contact: American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, First Floor , St. Louis, MO 63141, Telephone: (314) 991-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 365-2219 Fax: (314) 991-4101 Web Site: http://www.aoanet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Consumer education materials, School age children, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

Prevent Blindness America. 2005. Planning a trip to the eye doctor?. Chicago, IL: Prevent Blindness America, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet, which is geared toward parents, offers helpful tips that can make children's visit to an optometrist or ophthamologist more successful. Tips include asking a friend or relative for a recommendation, scheduling the appointment when the child is not cranky or hungry, making a list of questions, bringing something for the child to do in the waiting room, letting the child watch a family member get an eye exam, bringing the child's favorite comfort toy, and relaxing.

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Consumer education materials, Vision, Vision screening

California Department of Education, School Health Connections Office. 2005. A guide for vision testing in California public schools. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Education, 36 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides district and school health personnel in California with guidelines for a vision testing program and the laws and regulations that govern it. It is is divided into three sections: (1) introduction; (2) planning and follow-up procedures for vision testing; and (3) procedures for vision testing of nonliterate, nonverbal, non-English-speaking, and very young children, and children with special needs. Forms related to vision testing and applicable provisions from the California Code of Regulations and the Education Code are included in the appendixes. In addition, a glossary of technical terms and a list of selected references are provided.

Contact: California Department of Education, 1430 N Street, Sacramento, CA 95814, Telephone: (916) 319-0800 Secondary Telephone: (916) 445-4556 Web Site: http://www.cde.ca.gov/ Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8011-1560-4.

Keywords: California, Children with special health care needs, Regulations, School age children, School health services, State programs, Vision screening, Young children

Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau for Children, Youth, and Families. 2004. Vision screening guidelines: For infants, toddlers, children, and youth (35th ed.). Topeka, KS: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau for Children, Youth, and Families, 48 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines illustrates Kansas' vision screening program that can be used for all age children and youth in child health programs including EPSDT screening, well child screening, Part H early intervention screening, and school screening.

Contact: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau for Children, Youth, and Families, 1000 S.W. Jackson, Suite 220, Topeka, KS 66612-1274, Telephone: (785) 291-3368 Secondary Telephone: (800) 332-6262 Web Site: http://www.kdheks.gov/bfh/index.html

Keywords: Guidelines, Kansas, State initiatives, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests

Ferebee A. 2004. Childhood vision: Public challenges and opportunities. Washington, DC: The Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 20 pp. (A policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief provides a framework for policymakers, educators, and parents to assess the adequacy of current strategies to identify children with vision problems. The brief outlines issues in vision testing for children, describes programs and policies currently in place, summarizes select state and federal initiatives, and discusses policy options for ensuring that children's vision problems are identified and treated in a timely manner. Some information is presented in figures and tables throughout the brief. Endnotes are included. Two appendices contain a glossary and a summary of initiatives.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Children, Initiatives, Programs, Public policy, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests

American Optometric Association. 2002. Pediatric eye and vision examination. [2nd ed.]. St. Louis, MO: American Optometric Association, 60 pp. (Optometric clinical practice guideline)

Annotation: This guideline describes appropriate examination procedures for evaluation of the eye health and vision status of infants and children to reduce the risk of vision loss and facilitate normal visual development. The guideline contains recommendations for timely diagnosis, intervention, and, when necessary, consultation or referral for treatment by another health professional. Topics include the epidemiology of eye and vision disorders in children, the pediatric eye and vision examination, examination of infants and toddlers, examination of preschool children, examination of school-age children, and management of children.

Contact: American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, First Floor , St. Louis, MO 63141, Telephone: (314) 991-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 365-2219 Fax: (314) 991-4101 Web Site: http://www.aoanet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Diagnosis, Eye care, Eye diseases, Infant health, Intervention, Prevention, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

Special Olympics. 2001. Promoting health for individuals with mental retardation: A critical journey barely begun. Washington, DC: Special Olympics, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the health needs of people with mental retardation (MR) and makes recommendations for addressing those needs. The report also describes the Special Olympics Healthy Athletes program, which provides health assessment, health services, referral services, and health screening for Special Olympics athletes. It discusses oral health, vision, hearing, and obesity screening, as well as training for health professionals who serve people with MR.

Contact: Special Olympics, 1133 19th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3604, Telephone: (202) 628-3630 Secondary Telephone: (800) 700-8585 Fax: (202) 824-0200 E-mail: info@specialolympics.org Web Site: http://www.specialolympics.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health promotion, Hearing screening, Mental retardation, Oral health, Physical activity, Screening, Sports, Vision screening

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.