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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (95 total).

Hanes D. n.d.. Alabama Day Care Health and Safety Program: [Final report]. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Public Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this demonstration project was to develop and implement a comprehensive health and safety curriculum in child day care settings to improve the health status of children. A comprehensive educational program was developed and presented in the day care setting with a positive parenting component, a children's component, and a day care worker component. This educational curriculum demonstrated positive changes in child health indicators, day care environment, and safety, and increased knowledge of child development, health, and safety issues on the part of parents and day care workers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-182811.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child Care, Child safety, Health Education, Immunization, Parents, Preschoolers, Rural Populations, Urban Populations

Simmons E. n.d.. Youth in Transition—The Alabama Experience: [Final report]. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Education, 32 pp.

Annotation: This project focused on developing a systematic approach to integrate medical, vocational, educational, psychosocial, and developmental services for adolescents with physical disabilities and/or chronic illness who are at risk in their transition to maturity. Project objectives were to (1) create an administrative structure at the State level and in two pilot sites for provision of an integrated continuum of health and education services; (2) enable service providers, through training and collaboration, to coordinate service planning for the target population; (3) enable the adolescent and family, through counseling and training, to function as their own "case manager"; and (4) monitor and evaluate the model to determine the feasibility for replication in Alabama and/or other states. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147031.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Bases, Interdisciplinary Teams, Rural Population, Urban Population

Strahs B. n.d.. Family Shelter Project [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the dramatic rise in homelessness and substance abuse, the relationship between the two problems, and the increasing number of homeless families. The Family Shelter Project provided leadership and coordination for a broad range of health, social, and educational services to be provided to pregnant women, mothers, and children in a therapeutic community which has been established within a city shelter for homeless families. In addition, the project established a professional development collaborative to enhance the capacity of health professionals and those in related professions to serve the homeless, particularly the substance-abusing maternity services population. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-216208.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Collaboration of Care, Education of Health Professionals, Families, High risk groups, Homeless, Low income groups, Mothers, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Substance Abuse, Urban Populations

Johnson J. n.d.. Parent-Pediatric Partnerships: Strengthening Families to Make the Vulnerable Invincible [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Department of Health, 16 pp.

Annotation: This project was a partnership between families and their medical home to develop a demonstration model for care coordination for environmentally at-risk infants and toddlers in low-income culturally diverse urban and rural settings. The families were being served as part of the eligible population under P.L. 99–457, with an individualized family support plan (IFSP) developed for each family. The target population included many families of different ethnic origins. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133969.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Children with Special Health care Needs, Cultural Diversity, Families, Family Centered Health Care, Family Support Programs, Hawaiians, Health Promotion, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Low Income Population, PL 99-457, Parents, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Rural Population, Service Coordination, Urban Population

Probst JC, Jones KM. 2017. Trends in rural children's health and access to care. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 2 items. (Findings brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from a study that used three waves of the National Survey of Children's Health (2003, 2007, 2011-12) to create a portrait of the changing status of rural and urban children across the 2003–2013 decade. It focuses on the demographics of rural children, their financial access to care, reported use of care, and parentally-reported health status. A companion volume, Disparities in Access to Oral Health Care Among Rural Children: Current Status and Models for Innovation, explores trends in children's oral health across the same time frame. A fact sheet is also available.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Financing, Health care disparities, Health care utilization, Health status, Low income groups, Rural population, Trends, Urban population

Barzaga C. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Pomona, CA: Center for Oral Health, 19 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a project to implement comprehensive oral health services in two school-based health centers operating in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement (CQI), sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Appendices include the CQI plan, integration report, operations manual, and spatial analysis. A break-even analysis and process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, School districts, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Wovcha S. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Minneapolis, MN: Children's Dental Services, 26 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a project to integrate comprehensive oral health care into a school-based health center in Minneapolis, MN. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement (CQI), sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. A project brochure; a CQI plan; a memorandum of under- standing template; a permission form; and the process, outcome, and impact indicators/minimal data set are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Minnesota, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Poerio D. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. East Hartford, CT: Integrated Health Services, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to expand a school-based health center oral health program in East Hartford, CT. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. The appendices include parent permission forms for screening and treatment in English and Spanish, a program brochure, a referral list and forms, and a sterilization log. The process, out- come, and impact indicators/minimal data set is also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Connecticut, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, Service integration, Spanish language materials, Systems development, Urban population

Bruski K. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program [final report]. Costa Mesa, CA: Share Our Selves, 14 pp. plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes a project to integrate an oral-health-care program into an existing school-based clinic serving students attending a public charter school (kindergarten through grade 8) in Santa Ana, CA. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement, sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. Meeting agendas and minutes, a student consent form, and a program brochure and other outreach materials are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Outreach, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School based clinics, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Bruski K. 2016. Children’s Oral Healthcare Access Program (COHAP) [final report]. Suisun City, CA: Solano Coalition for Better Health, 45 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a coalition-led project to integrate comprehensive oral health services into an existing school-based health center in the Vallejo City Unified School District in California. Topics include delivery-system design, interdisciplinary care, client/community education, continuous quality improvement (CQI), sustainability, evaluation, and resources and capabilities. The project logic model, marketing tools, classroom-education materials, a performance-improvement-committee definition and plan, an appointment agreement and no show-policy, a CQI plan, and process and outcome data elements are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Comprehensive health care, Dental care, Final reports, Health services delivery, Interdisciplinary approach, Local initiatives, Model programs, Oral health, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School districts, Service integration, Systems development, Urban population

Kann L, Olsen EO, McManus T, Harris WA, Shanklin SL, Flint KH, Queen B, Lowry R, Chyen D, Whittle L, Thornton J, Lim C, Yamakawa Y, Brenner N, Zaza S. 2016. Sexual identify, sex of sexual contacts, and health-related behaviors among students in grades 9–12: United States and selected sites, 2015. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 65(9):1–202,

Annotation: This report summarizes results for 118 health-related behaviors plus obesity, overweight, and asthma by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, 25 state surveys, and 19 large urban school district surveys conducted among students in grades 9–12. Contents include a description of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System, survey methodology, and survey results for the prevalence of health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students compared with nonsexual minority students. Recommendations for reducing disparities in health-risk behaviors among sexual minority students are also included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Comparative analysis, Health behavior, Health surveys, Individual characteristics, Minority groups, National surveys, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Risk factors, Risk taking, School districts, School surveys, Sex factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexual identity, Sexual partners, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population

Doescher M, Keppel G. 2015. Dentist supply, dental care utilization, and oral health among rural and urban U.S. residents. Seattle, WA: WWAMI Rural Health Research Center, 13 pp. (Report #135)

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national study to examine whether adults in rural locations compared to those in urban locations reported lower oral health care use, higher prevalence of oral disease, or both after accounting for socioeconomic and other factors. The report also provides findings on the impact of dentist supply in rural and urban areas in the United States on adult oral health care use and prevalence of oral disease.

Contact: WWAMI Rural Health Research Center, University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Box 354982, Seattle, WA 98195-4982, Telephone: (206) 685-0402 Fax: (206) 616-4768 E-mail: rhrc@fammed.washington.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/uwrhrc Available from the website.

Keywords: Dentists, Oral health, Rural population, Socioeconomic factors, Urban population, Work force

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support. 2014. Bronx Teens Connections' Clinic Linkage Model: Connecting young people with clinical sexual and reproductive health services. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 2 pp. (Public health practice stories from the field)

Annotation: This document describes the Bronx Teens Connection (BxTC) program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, a multicomponent initiative to reduce pregnancy rates among adolescent and young adult females ages 15-19. Contents include information on program activities, accomplishments, and lessons learned. Topics include establishing formal linkages between clinics and schools or youth-serving organizations, connecting youth to high-quality clinical sexual health services.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop E-70, Atlanta, GA 30341, E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/stltpublichealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Clinics, Health services delivery, Local MCH programs, Model programs, Prevention programs, Reproductive health, School linked programs, Sexual health, Urban population

Ng AS, Kaye K. 2013. Science says: Teen childbearing in rural America. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 6 pp. (No. 47)

Annotation: This research brief provides data comparing teen childbearing in rural, suburban, and urban areas nationwide and examining how this has changed over time. Topic include the rural teen population, characteristics and prevalence of teen childbearing across the rural-urban continuum, changes between 1990 and 2010, and synthesizing the information. A description of the methodology is also included.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Research, Rural population, Statistical data, Suburban population, Trends, Urban population

Martin AB, Gallagher A, Probst JC. 2013. Dental sealant utilization among rural and urban children. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 10 pp.

Annotation: This document presents findings from a study to examine the proportion of children and adolescents (ages 6–14) from rural areas and from urban areas who have dental sealants. Topics include parentally reported dental sealant use, characteristics associated with reported sealant use, and a comparison of data in the Survey of Income and Program Participation (Census Bureau) and data in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Data, Dental sealants, Methods, Oral health, Rural population, Urban population

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry. 2013. Oral Health Access for Young Children Program: Final report. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an evaluation of a pilot program to assess the oral health needs of children and families in Nebraska, and provide preventive oral health services. Contents include a program overview and summaries for each of fifteen regional and community partners who helped to administer and implement the program across the state. The summaries include data on the number and distribution of dentists and dental hygienists; the number of children seen, client visits, fluoride varnish treatments, clinic hours, community sites, and staff involved; satisfaction and referral rates; racial ethnic and age distributions; oral health status (unhealthy gums, need further care, early childhood caries); and access to oral health care (dental home, Medicaid, no dental insurance). Lessons learned, recommendations, and opportunities are also discussed. The program model and forms are provided as appendices.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry, 301 Centennial Mall South, Lincoln, NE 68509, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 Web Site: http://dhhs.ne.gov/publichealth/Pages/dental_index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Final reports, Grants, Health status, Local initiatives, Nebraska, Needs assessment, Oral health, Pilot projects, Program evaluation, Public private partnerships, Rural population, State surveys, Statistical data, Urban population, Young children

Rough A. 2012. The Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document provides information about the Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality, which focuses on eliminating racial inequities contributing to infant mortality in U.S. urban areas. The brief discusses the partnership's activities, actions identified to reduce infant mortality, challenges and impacts, and lessons learned.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Communication, Infant mortality, Intervention, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Racial factors, Racism, Urban populations

O'Hare W. 2011. The changing child population of the United States: Analysis of data from the 2010 Census. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 25 pp. (KIDS COUNT working paper)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of changes in the U.S. child population based on the first data released from the 2010 census. The report provides a review of national-level changes in the number of children historically, with a specific focus on the 2000 to 2010 period relative to changes over the past century, followed by an examination of changes in the racial composition of the child population. The report then examines state-level changes and the size and racial composition of the child population. The report also highlights some changes in large cities from 2000 to 2010. Finally, the report discusses key implications.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Population growth, Racial factors, Statistical data, Trends, Urban populations

Hendryx M, Weiner C, Gurka M. 2011. Water fluoridation and dental health indicators in rural and urban areas of the United States: Final report. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia Rural Health Research Center, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the availability of fluoridated water across urban-rural settings and relates measures of fluoride availability to national survey measures of oral health in adults and children. Contents include the study background, methodology, results, and conclusions. Policy recommendations are provided.

Contact: West Virginia Rural Health Research Center, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 9190, Morgantown, WV 26506-9190, Telephone: (304) 293-7607 Fax: (304) 293-6685 Web Site: http://publichealth.hsc.wvu.edu/wvrhrc Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental caries, Families, Fluorides, Measures, Oral health, Research, Rural population, Urban population, Water

Lenardson JD, Ziller EC, Lambert D, Race MM, Yousefian A. 2010. Access to mental health services and family impact of rural children with mental health problems. Portland, ME: Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy, 23 pp. (Working paper no. 45)

Annotation: This report compares prevalence, access, problem severity, and family impact for rural and urban children with mental health problems, using data from the 2005-06 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) and the 2006 Area Resource File. A related research and policy brief is also available.

Contact: Catherine E. Cutler Institute for Child and Family Policy, Edmund S. Muskie School of Public Service, University of Southern Maine, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, Telephone: (207) 780-4141 Secondary Telephone: (800) 800-4876 Fax: (207) 780-5817 Web Site: http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/schoolreadiness Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Mental disorders, Mental health, Rural population, Statistics, Urban population

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.