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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

Continelli T, Bruce C, Roberts E, Martiniano R. 2015. A profile of oral health providers in New York State. Rensselaer, NY: Center for Health Workforce Studies, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief provides information about the dentist and dental hygienist work force in New York state, including the concentration of dentists vs. dental hygienists, the concentration of dentists in urban vs. rural areas, the diversity of the oral health work force compared with the diversity of the state’s population, the ages of dentists and dental hygienists, and the educational attainment of dental hygienists. Sources and limitations of the data are described.

Contact: Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, State University of New York, School of Public Health, One University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 E-mail: chws@health.ny.gov Web Site: https://www.chwsny.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Cultural diversity, Dental hygienists, Dentists, Educational attainment, Health disparities, New York, Oral health, Rural environment, Urban environment, Work force

Austin Turner M, Edelman P, Poethig E, Aron L with Rogers M, Lowenstein C. 2014. Tackling persistent poverty in distressed urban neighborhoods: History, principles, and strategies for philanthropic investment. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes lessons learned and evolving practice in the field of place-based interventions, and it offers a set of guiding principles for child-focused, place-conscious initiatives focused on persistent, intergenerational poverty. The paper focuses on experience and insights in distressed urban neighborhoods. Contents include a summary of the origins and evolution of place-based anitpoverty initiatives, emerging principles and initiatives, a conceptual framework, and recommendations for philanthropic intervention.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Financial support, Intergenerational programs, Intervention, Local initiatives, Models, Poverty, Urban environment

Hawkins J, Bonzon E, Rough A. 2012. The built environment. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs; Omaha, NE: CityMaTCH, 4 pp. (Women's health prevention brief; issue 3)

Annotation: This brief focuses on the importance of addressing the built environment to improve maternal health and birth outcomes. Contents include an overview of the built environment and research on the connections between the built environment and health, the biological and social impacts of an unsupportive built environment on maternal health and birth outcomes, and promising programs at the state and local levels.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental health, Health care systems, Maternal health, Model programs, Pregnancy outcome, Preventive health services, State MCH programs, Urban MCH programs

Hendryx M, Gurka M, Ahern M, Putman H. 2012. Childhood asthma in rural-urban areas. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia Rural Health Research Center, 8 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief summarizes a study to assess rates of lifetime and current asthma for children across rural and urban regions within the United States. The brief describes the background and purpose of the study, which examines how asthma may be related to rural areas adjacent or non-adjacent to larger population centers, to variation in measures of air quality, to varying levels of agricultural and animal production, and to other characteristics such as obesity, race/ethnicity, or health insurance. It includes a summary of the study results; a discussion of policy implications; and tables that indicate the rates of asthma according to rural or urban designation and the statistical chances of developing asthma based on different variables. The study was funded by the Office of Rural Health Policy, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Resources, Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Rural Health Policy.

Contact: West Virginia Rural Health Research Center, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 9190, Morgantown, WV 26506-9190, Telephone: (304) 293-7607 Fax: (304) 293-6685 Web Site: http://publichealth.hsc.wvu.edu/wvrhrc Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. ORHP00564.

Keywords: Asthma, Policy development, Regional factors, Rural environment, Rural health, Studies, Urban health

CityMatCH. 2012. The Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) approach for preventing infant mortality in US urban communities. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH,

Annotation: This fact sheet describes a community approach and an analytic framework for investigating and addressing high infant mortality rates in urban settings. The fact sheet describes the development of the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) approach and how it is used to monitor progress, (surveillance), guide public health planning, and prioritize prevention activities. Related resources including training materials, a learning network, presentations, data tables, and publications are available from the website.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Data analysis, Infant mortality, Interdisciplinary approach, Perinatal influences, Planning, Urban environment

American Public Health Association, Safe Routes to School National Partnership. 2012. Promoting active transportation: An opportunity for public health. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 26 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides an overview of public health considerations in transportation planning and decision-making, emphasizing the importance of promoting physical activity and active modes of transportation such as biking and walking. The guide explains how transportation programs are organized and funded, and suggests ways that public health professionals can become leaders in the development of active transportation policies. It includes case studies of success stories, communication strategies to build relationships, and examples of various ways to become involved in transportation, land use, and built environment decisions at various levels (community, regional, and state). A variety of additional resources and ideas, are provided throughout the guide to help health professionals become actively engaged in the process of promoting active transportation.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Model programs, Physical activity, Planning, Policy development, Public health, Transportation, Urban environment

Prevention Institute. 2011. Urban Networks to Increase Thriving Youth (UNITY). Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute,

Annotation: This section of the Prevention Institute's website is designed to build support for effective, sustainable efforts to prevent violence before it occurs so that urban youth can thrive in safe environments with supportive relationships and opportunities for success. The website provides tools, publications, and strategies for preventing violence including information on how U.S. cities prevent violence and a searchable resource library. The UNITY RoadMap is also provided, which details the who, what, and how of effective, sustainable violence prevention.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Cities, Resources for professionals, Urban environment, Violence prevention

Lee V, Mikkelsen L, Srikantharajah J, Cohen L. 2008. Strategies for enhancing the built environment to support healthy eating and active living. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, Healthy Eating Active Living Convergence Partnership, 24 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines a range of organizational practices and public policies being considered to improve the built environment in support of healthy eating and regular physical activity. The brief begins with a description of key characteristics of the built environment and how they affect eating and activity behaviors. It then outlines three target areas -- active transportation and public transit, activity-friendly recreation environments, and land use planning -- and provides a general overview of the breadth of strategies and federal policies to effect the change. The brief also highlights political opportunities, primarily at state and federal levels, that promote increased levels of physical activity and healthy eating in communities.

Contact: Convergence Partnership, PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: http://www.kintera.org/site/lookup.asp?c=fhLOK6PELmF&b=3930101 Web Site: http://www.convergencepartnership.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Communities, Food habits, Low income groups, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public policy, Urban environment

Martin AB, Wang E, Probst JC, Hale N, Johnson, AO. 2008. Dental health and access to care among rural children: A national and state portrait . Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 131 pp. (The national survey of children's health 2003)

Annotation: This chartbook examines oral health status, use of preventive services, and dental insurance among children living in rural areas compared with children living in urban areas. Data for the report were drawn from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health. The chartbook is organized into three main sections. The first section analyzes condition of teeth, receipt of oral health services, and dental insurance among rural children in the nation as a whole. Rankings of rural portions of states are included at the end of each analysis. Availability of dentists is also provided in the national section. The next section breaks down the analysis into four regions of the United States (Northeast, South, Midwest, and West), using the same factors of interest. Next, the chartbook describes the condition of teeth and dental insurance status of rural and urban children within each state individually. Key findings for each state are highlighted. A detailed description of the data and analytic methods used to compile the information presented is provided at the end of the chartbook.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Health status, Oral health, Preventive health services, Rural environment, Statistics, Urban environment

CityMatCH. 2007. Building the best environments for families and children: XVII Annual CityMatCH Urban MCH Leadership Conference. CityLights 16(3):1-12,

Annotation: This issue of City Lights focuses on the seventeenth Annual CityMatCH Urban MCH Leadership Conference, Building the Best Environment for Families and Children, held in 2007 in Denver, Colorado. The issue provides information about the conference and describes conference sessions; it also includes articles on health impact assessment: tools for moving toward healthier policies, building the best environments for vulnerable families and children: the post-Katrina story; the 2006-2007 DaTA team graduation; and fostering creativity to reach innovative solutions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Environmental influences, Families, Health, Infants, Public policy, Urban populations, Vulnerability

Pebley,AR, Vaiana ME. 2002. In our backyard: How 3 L.A. neighborhoods affect kids' lives. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 37 pp. (Labor and population program, working paper series 00-18)

Annotation: This report discusses the subtle interaction between children's well-being and the neighborhoods in which they grow up, and how groups support children by improving their environment. This report draws on the Focused Study of Children and Neighborhoods (FCSN), a survey of three neighborhoods in Los Angeles conducted in 1998. Topics focusing on neighborhoods include changes in demographics, income, residential turnover, neighborhood safety, and social cohesion. Topics focusing on the children in these neighborhoods include behavior and behavior problems, school performance, overall health, and other children's outcomes such as health insurance coverage and stress of living in unsafe neighborhoods. The final section of the report gives an overview of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A. FANS). Endnotes, recommended readings, and a description of the study methods used are provided. Statistical information is provided in chart, graph, and table formats throughout the report.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $18.00, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: California, Child development, Child welfare, Community role, Community surveys, Environmental influences, Socioeconomic factors, Surveys, Urban environment

Walker, C. 2002. Community development corporations and their changing support systems. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute, 63 pp.

Annotation: This document assesses changes over the 1990s in community development corporations (CDCs) and the growing support systems that have been constructed to further their work. The document is divided into the following five sections: (1) neighborhood problems and CDC responses; (2) activities, size, and quality of CDC industries; (3) changes in productive systems; (4) changes in capacity-building systems; and (5) leadership systems. The analysis relies on 10 years of research in 23 cities funded by the National Community Development Initiative (NCDI), a consortium of national corporations, foundations, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community development corporations, Community participation, Data, Service delivery systems, Statistics analysis, Trends, Urban environment, Urban populations

Dorey AKV. 1999. Better baby contests: The scientific quest for perfect childhood health in the early twentieth century. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company, 265 pp.

Annotation: This book recounts the history of the better baby contests held in the years before World War I. The first section discusses steps to reduce infant mortality and the beginnings of the healthy baby contests. The second section explains what standards were used to judge babies and public relations considerations for the contests. Section III describes the parent education programs begun in conjunction with the contests. The fourth and final section of the book documents criticism of the contests and tells of alternate infant health programs developed in response to that criticism.

Contact: McFarland Press, P.O. Box 611, Jefferson, NC 28640, Telephone: (336) 246-4460 Secondary Telephone: (800) 253-2187 Fax: (336) 246-5018 E-mail: info@mcfarlandpub.com Web Site: http://www.mcfarlandpub.com $38.50 plus shipping. Document Number: ISBN 0-7864-0617-8.

Keywords: Child welfare, Health promotion, History, Infant development, Infant health, Infant mortality, Parent education programs, Program development, Public relations, Standards, Urban environment

Walsh J. 1999. The eye of the storm: Ten years on the front lines of New Futures. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 41 pp.

Bartfai N, Frechtling J, Silverstein G, Snow K, Somers L. 1999. Collected case study evaluations: Issues in rural communities, issues in urban communities, issues in sustainability. Washington, DC: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, 353 pp. (Case study report)

Wasserman G. 1993. Determinants of Adverse Outcome among Toddlers of Adolescent Mothers [Final report]. New York, NY: Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, 16 pp.

Annotation: This study sought to identify family influences on early childhood development in a sample of high-risk minority children and their mothers. The ways in which maternal personality, parenting and social support impact on the child, and the relative importance of other family members, such as the child's father and/or grandmothers were examined. In general, aspects of family composition and material functioning were found to be better predictors of child outcome than was maternal age. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-218633.

Keywords: Adolescent Parents, Adolescents, Adolescents, Blacks, Early Childhood Development, Families, Family Environment, Hispanics, Hispanics, MCH Research, Minorities, Minority Groups, Mother Infant Interaction, Stress, Urban Population, Urban Populations

Texas Department of Human Resources,Office of Medical Programs, Research and Demonstration Division. 1978. Final report: EPSDT in an urban setting--Dallas Research and Demonstration Project. [Austin, TX?]: Texas Department of Human Resources, Office of Medical Programs, Research and Demonstration Division, 472 pp. (Hiscock Collection; no. 116)

Annotation: This report describes an Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) project in Dallas, Texas, designed to address problems of low participation by recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) and high costs of EPSDT services. It discusses variations in outreach and follow-up services, along with a mix of service delivery staff over the three-year period July 1975 through June 1978. Topics include the project design; increased accessibility through fixed site clinics, extra-neighborhood clinics, and in-home screening; young adult clinics; comprehensive patient assistance; non-participation survey; maximized interagency cooperation; administrations; and conclusions and recommendations.

Keywords: Case management, EPSDT, Local programs, Outreach, Program evaluation, Texas, Urban environment

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Health Services Research Institute. 1977. EPSDT demonstration in an urban setting -- Dallas, Texas: Third evaluation report--Periods covered July 1, 1975...June 30, 1977 [Evaluation report phase 3 Feb 1976-June 1977]. San Antonio,TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Health Services Research Institute, 76 pp. (Hiscock Collection; no. 35)

Annotation: This report describes activities in a project established to develop innovative and effective outreach methods to increase participation in the EPSDT program and follow-up methods to increase the degree to which children with problems found in screening receive and complete treatment. It address outreach (case finding) and follow-up (case monitoring).

Keywords: Local programs, Case management, EPSDT, Outreach, Reports, Texas, Urban environment

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Health Services Research Institute. 1976-1978. EPSDT demonstration in an urban setting -- Dallas, Texas: Second evaluation report--Period covered: February 1, 1976-December 31, 1976 [Evaluation report phase 2: Feb-Dec 1976]. San Antonio,TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Health Services Research Institute, 172 pp. (Hiscock Collection; no. 34)

Annotation: This report is the second of four quarterly reports addressing a project to develop and test innovative, effective, and inexpensive methods of case finding (outreach) and case monitoring (follow-up) for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program in an urban environment. It addresses case finding, case monitoring, costs, the data system and data management, and the project's history to date.

Keywords: Local programs, Case management, EPSDT, Outreach, Reports, Texas, Urban environment

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Health Services Research Institute. 1976-1978. EPSDT demonstration in an urban setting -- Dallas, Texas: Fourth evaluation report--[Final evaluation report-Phase 4, Feb. 1976-June 1978]. San Antonio,TX: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Health Services Research Institute, 1 v. (Hiscock Collection; no. 36)

Annotation: This report is the fourth of four quarterly reports addressing a project to develop and test innovative, effective, and inexpensive methods of case finding (outreach) and case monitoring (follow-up) for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) program in an urban environment. It addresses case finding; case monitoring; costs; and data acquisition, management, and supporting ADP systems.

Keywords: Local programs, Case management, EPSDT, Outreach, Reports, Texas, Urban environment

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.