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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (25 total).

Hanes D. n.d.. Alabama Day Care Health and Safety Program: [Final report]. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Public Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this demonstration project was to develop and implement a comprehensive health and safety curriculum in child day care settings to improve the health status of children. A comprehensive educational program was developed and presented in the day care setting with a positive parenting component, a children's component, and a day care worker component. This educational curriculum demonstrated positive changes in child health indicators, day care environment, and safety, and increased knowledge of child development, health, and safety issues on the part of parents and day care workers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB96-182811.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child Care, Child safety, Health Education, Immunization, Parents, Preschoolers, Rural Populations, Urban Populations

Strahs B. n.d.. Family Shelter Project [Final report]. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the dramatic rise in homelessness and substance abuse, the relationship between the two problems, and the increasing number of homeless families. The Family Shelter Project provided leadership and coordination for a broad range of health, social, and educational services to be provided to pregnant women, mothers, and children in a therapeutic community which has been established within a city shelter for homeless families. In addition, the project established a professional development collaborative to enhance the capacity of health professionals and those in related professions to serve the homeless, particularly the substance-abusing maternity services population. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-216208.

Keywords: Child Abuse and Neglect, Collaboration of Care, Education of Health Professionals, Families, High risk groups, Homeless, Low income groups, Mothers, Pregnant Women, Prenatal Care, Substance Abuse, Urban Populations

Rough A. 2012. The Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This document provides information about the Partnership to Eliminate Disparities in Infant Mortality, which focuses on eliminating racial inequities contributing to infant mortality in U.S. urban areas. The brief discusses the partnership's activities, actions identified to reduce infant mortality, challenges and impacts, and lessons learned.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Communication, Infant mortality, Intervention, Prevention, Programs, Racial factors, Racial factors, Racism, Urban populations

O'Hare W. 2011. The changing child population of the United States: Analysis of data from the 2010 Census. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 25 pp. (KIDS COUNT working paper)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of changes in the U.S. child population based on the first data released from the 2010 census. The report provides a review of national-level changes in the number of children historically, with a specific focus on the 2000 to 2010 period relative to changes over the past century, followed by an examination of changes in the racial composition of the child population. The report then examines state-level changes and the size and racial composition of the child population. The report also highlights some changes in large cities from 2000 to 2010. Finally, the report discusses key implications.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Population growth, Racial factors, Statistical data, Trends, Urban populations

Acevedo-Garcia D, McArdle N, Osypuk TL, Lefkowitz B, Krimgold BK. 2007. Children left behind: How metropolitan areas are failing America's children. Boston, MA: Harvard School of Public Health; Washington, DC: Center for the Advancement of Health, 42 pp., plus chartbook.

Annotation: This report describes the difficulties faced by children--particularly black and Hispanic children--living in metropolitan areas. The report conclusions are drawn from diversitydata.org, a new Web site profiling U.S. metropolitan areas, which are home to 80 percent of the nation's schools. The report focuses on the 100 metropolitan areas with the largest child populations. The report includes a detailed summary, which discusses background, findings, policy implications, levers for action, and models that work. References are included. The remainder of the report is a chartbook consisting of figures.

Contact: Harvard University, T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, Telephone: (617) 495-1000 Web Site: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Child development, Children, Education, Hispanics, Income factors, Low income groups, Racial factors, Schools, Statistical data, Urban populations

King J, Geiger L, Silberman P, Slifkin R. 2007. State profiles of Medicaid and SCHIP in rural and urban areas. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 11 pp. (Final report no. 91)

Annotation: This report provides data that compares Medicaid enrollment and expenditures in rural and urban counties by state. It briefly describes other data contained in the state profiles of Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program in rural and urban areas. The report includes summary tables that show the rural-urban variation within each state. Footnotes are included.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, 725 Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, CB# 7590, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, Telephone: (919) 966-5011 E-mail: contact@schsr.unc.edu Web Site: http://www.schsr.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Enrollment, Medicaid, Rural populations, State Children's Health Insurance Program, Statistical data, Urban populations

CityMatCH. 2007. Building the best environments for families and children: XVII Annual CityMatCH Urban MCH Leadership Conference. CityLights 16(3):1-12,

Annotation: This issue of City Lights focuses on the seventeenth Annual CityMatCH Urban MCH Leadership Conference, Building the Best Environment for Families and Children, held in 2007 in Denver, Colorado. The issue provides information about the conference and describes conference sessions; it also includes articles on health impact assessment: tools for moving toward healthier policies, building the best environments for vulnerable families and children: the post-Katrina story; the 2006-2007 DaTA team graduation; and fostering creativity to reach innovative solutions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Environmental influences, Families, Health, Infants, Public policy, Urban populations, Vulnerability

Grace C, Shores EF, Zaslow M, Brown B, Aufseeser D, Bell L. 2006. Rural disparities in baseline data of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: A chartbook. Mississippi State, MS: National Center for Rural Early Childhood Learning Initiatives, 139 pp. (Rural early childhood report no. 3)

Annotation: This chartbook introduces the results from an analysis contrasting young children's care and development in rural and non-rural settings using baselines data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study birth and kindergarten cohorts (coordinated studies, one following a nationally representative group of infants through entry into school and the other following a nationally representative group of kindergarteners through elementary school). The report begins with a narrative section that discusses school readiness, utilization of early care and education arrangements, American Indian and Alaska Native young children, and mental health and family life. The main body of the chartbook consists of data tables.

Contact: National Center for Rural Early Childhood Learning Initiatives, Mississippi State University, 46 Blackjack Road, Mailstop 9749, P.O. Box 6013, Mississippi State, MS 39762, Telephone: (662) 325-4836 Fax: (662) 325-5436 Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Child care, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Families, Mental health, Rural populations, School readiness, Statistics, Urban populations, Young children

Osborne C, Knab J. 2006. The effects of health on health insurance status in fragile families. Princeton, NJ: Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Princeton University, 43 pp. (Working paper no. 06-10-FF)

Annotation: This paper uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to estimate the effects of poor infant health, pre-pregnancy health conditions of the mother, and the father's health status on health insurance status of urban, mostly unmarried mothers and their 1-year-old children.The paper, which includes an abstract, introduces the issue; provides background; discusses the data, the descriptive analysis, and the modeling strategy; presents multivariate results; and offers a conclusion. References are included. Statistical information is presented in tables at the end of the paper.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Fathers, Health insurance, Single mothers, Uninsured persons, Urban populations, Women's health

Curtis A, Leitner M. 2006. Geographic information systems and public health: Eliminating perinatal disparity. Hershey, PA: Idea Group, 317 pp.

Annotation: This book, which is intended for students and others involved in public or community health with an interest in learning about a geographic information system (GIS), provides information on how to use a GIS to improve birth outcomes. The book is divided into the following chapters: (1) explaining the geography of infant health, (2) an introduction to GIS (data), (3) an introduction to GIS (spatial), (4) the geography of health risks, (5) GIS and spatial analysis: keeping it simple, (6) advanced spatial analysis, (7) spatial/temporal stability in neighborhoods of risk: the mobility of mothers, (8) patient confidentiality, (9) creating the Baton Rouge Healthy Start GIS, (10) bioterrorism, pregnancy, and old white men, and (11) rural health issues and their investigation in a GIS.

Contact: IRM Press, Idea Group, 701 East Chocoloate Avenue, Suite 200, Hershey, PA 17033-1240, Telephone: (717) 533-8845 Fax: (717) 533-8661 E-mail: cust@idea-group.com Web Site: http://www.irma-international.org/irmpress/index.asp Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-59140-610-2.

Keywords: Communities, Confidentiality, Geographic factors, Healthy Start, Infant health, Infant mortality, Louisiana, Mothers, Pregnancy outcome, Prevention programs, Public health, Rural populations, Urban populations

Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program and Population Reference Bureau. 2006. Kids in the City: Indicators of child well-being in large cities from the 2004 American Community Survey. Washington, DC: Metropolitan Policy Program, Brookings Institution, 11 pp. (Survey series)

Annotation: This report provides information about levels of child poverty in the 50 largest cities in the United States, and the factors underlying those rates. The intent of the report is to document the variations in child poverty rates in different cities and the contextual factors associated with outcomes for children and families in different parts of the country. The report also seeks to demonstrate the usefulness of the Census Bureau's American Community Survey for monitoring child well-being in cities and elsewhere. The report, which begins with a summary of findings, discusses the methodology used, presents findings, and offers a conclusion. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. Endnotes are included.

Contact: Brookings Institution, Metropolitan Policy Program, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu/metro.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Ethnic factors, Families, Poverty, Racial factors, Single parents, Surveys, Trends, Urban populations, Working parents

TeleHealth Connections for Children and Youth Project. 2005. Telemedicine for CSHCN: A state-by-state comparison of Medicaid reimbursement policies and Title V activities. Gainesville, FL: Institute for Child Health Policy, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report presents results of two nationwide surveys. The first is a survey of Medicaid programs regarding telemedicine services, with a specific target of identifying common strategies related to Medicaid reimbursement. The second is a survey of Title V programs in each of the 50 states to ascertain the types of telemedicine services specifically available for children with special health care needs served by Title V. Common themes are abstracted in the report, and state-level detail is provided in tables. A concluding commentary is also included. The report includes two appendices: (1) glossary of telemedicine terms and (2) telemedicine resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida, 1329 SW 16th Street, Room 5130 , Gainesville, FL 32608, Telephone: (352) 265-7220 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (352) 265-7221 Web Site: http://www.ichp.ufl.edu/ichp Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children with special health care needs, Florida, Health services, Medicaid, Reimbursement, Rural populations, Surveys, Telemedicine, Title V programs, Urban populations

CityMatCH. 2005. For all it's worth: Leading with values and vision. CityLights. 14(2):1-8. 2005. ,

Annotation: This issue of City Lights focuses on the Annual Urban Maternal and Child Health Leadership conference, For All It's Worth: Leading with Values and Vision, which took place on September 10, 2005, in Forth Worth, TX. The newsletter discusses conference presentations, workshops, and other conference-related topics and activities and includes articles on (1) connecting strategies with maternal and child health vision: the science vs. the practice in perinatal and preconception health and (2) DaTA Institute teams' completion of a yearlong training program. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Families, Infant health, Leadership, MCH programs, MCH services, Perinatal health, Preconception health, Texas, Training, Urban populations, Women's health

Larson SL, Machlin SR, Nixon A, Zodet M. 2004. Health care in urban and rural areas, combined years 1998-2000. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 39 pp. (MEPS chartbook; no. 13)

Annotation: This chartbook examines the differences in health care access, use, and expenses between urban and rural areas. Counties are classified along the urban-rural continuum according to whether they are metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and, if they are not, according to their proximity to an MSA. The chartbook presents data from the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey; the charts indicate similarities and differences between rural and urban places on measure of health care access, use, and expenses. The chartbook is organized into three sections. The first compares people in four categories along the urban-rural continuum (metro, near-metro, near-rural, and rural). the second provides information on insurance access and access to care. The third focuses on variations in use and expenses for ambulatory care, prescription medications, and dental care. An updated edition, covering 2004-2006, was published in 2009.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 04-0050.

Keywords: Access to health care, Costs, Data, Dental care, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Prescription drugs, Primary care, Rural health, Rural populations, Statistics, Urban health, Urban populations

Marx E. 2003. Stories from the field: Lessons learned about building coordinated school health programs. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 168 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the challenge of making systemic changes in schools and school districts and examines how schools have incorporated strategies to promote student health and education outcomes. The book is divided into four parts. Part 1 describes what coordinated school health programs are and why they are needed. Part 2 discusses practical considerations for implementing such programs, highlights key questions addressed in the stories included in part 3 of the book, and summarizes lessons learned. Part 3 presents nine stores of coordinated school health programs serving a range of socioeconomic and ethnic populations in rural, suburban, and urban settings throughout the United States. Part 4 concludes with a list of print and online resources and national organizations that can provide additional information.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Education, Rural populations, School districts, School health programs, School health services, Schools, Urban populations

Walker, C. 2002. Community development corporations and their changing support systems. Washington, D.C.: Urban Institute, 63 pp.

Annotation: This document assesses changes over the 1990s in community development corporations (CDCs) and the growing support systems that have been constructed to further their work. The document is divided into the following five sections: (1) neighborhood problems and CDC responses; (2) activities, size, and quality of CDC industries; (3) changes in productive systems; (4) changes in capacity-building systems; and (5) leadership systems. The analysis relies on 10 years of research in 23 cities funded by the National Community Development Initiative (NCDI), a consortium of national corporations, foundations, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community development corporations, Community participation, Data, Service delivery systems, Statistics analysis, Trends, Urban environment, Urban populations

CityMatCH. 1997-. CITYLIGHTS. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, irregular.

Annotation: This newsletter focuses on topics of interest to members of CityMatCH -- the national organization of city and county health departments' maternal and child health (MCH) programs and leaders representing urban communities in the United States. The serial includes articles that focus on improving the health and well-being of urban women, children, and families and on strengthening the public health organizations and leaders in communities where these populations are served. Individual editions often highlight specific issues in maternal and child health. Conference updates, statistics, and resource information are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health services, Electronic newsletters, Leadership, MCH programs, Program improvement, Public health, Urban populations

Wasserman G. 1993. Determinants of Adverse Outcome among Toddlers of Adolescent Mothers [Final report]. New York, NY: Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, 16 pp.

Annotation: This study sought to identify family influences on early childhood development in a sample of high-risk minority children and their mothers. The ways in which maternal personality, parenting and social support impact on the child, and the relative importance of other family members, such as the child's father and/or grandmothers were examined. In general, aspects of family composition and material functioning were found to be better predictors of child outcome than was maternal age. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB94-218633.

Keywords: Adolescent Parents, Adolescents, Adolescents, Blacks, Early Childhood Development, Families, Family Environment, Hispanics, Hispanics, MCH Research, Minorities, Minority Groups, Mother Infant Interaction, Stress, Urban Population, Urban Populations

Oyemade UJ, Brandon-Monye D, eds. 1990. Ecology of alcohol and other drug use: Helping black high-risk youth. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Substance Abuse Prevention, 228 pp. (OSAP prevention monograph; 7)

Annotation: This report presents the proceedings of a conference sponsored by Howard University's School of Human Ecology in October, 1987. The conference provided a forum for sharing information with the goal of formulating a model for primary prevention focusing on Black high-risk youth. The forum presentations included practitioners, law enforcement officers, representatives of the pharmaceutical industry, civic organizations and housing cooperatives, and Federal policymakers. Chapter topics include: innovative approaches developed for high-risk youth, coalition building, and strategy development at the community level.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Alcohol use, Drug use, High risk populations, Intervention, Primary prevention, Race, Socioeconomic status, Substance abuse, Urban population

Kasten I. [1988]. Breastfeeding Promotion Project [Final report]. Olympia, WA: Washington Department of Social and Health Services, 33 pp.

Annotation: This project had three major goals: providing breastfeeding education to professionals across Washington State, developing culturally relevant educational materials about breastfeeding for use statewide, and evaluating a model of service delivery for increasing breastfeeding among low-income women. Products included a videotape for health professionals, a triage tool, and a series of fact sheets in Southeast Asian languages. Training and consultation have been provided to community clinics. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB91-241950.

Keywords: Blacks, Breastfeeding, Low income groups, Mothers, Peer Support Counseling, Urban PopulationsRural Population, WIC Program

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.