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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 19 (19 total).

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. 2011. Choosing a birth control method: A quick reference guide for clinicians. Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 88 pp.

Annotation: This reference guide provides information about all the contraceptive methods available in the United States. The guide is intended to help health professionals quickly counsel women about choosing the most appropriate and effective contraception for them. The guide discusses combined hormonal contraception, progestin-only contraception, intrauterine contraception, barrier methods, spermicides, coitus interruptus, fertility awareness, male sterilization, female sterilzation, and emergency contraception,

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Condoms, Contraception, Counseling, Emergency contraception, Prevention, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Ranji U. 2011. Reproductive health care policy for women in the United States. [Menlo Park, CA]: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation,

Annotation: This online tutorial discusses major trends in reproductive health for women. Topics include contraception and family planning; sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS; adolescents and reproductive health; pregnancy and childbirth; paying for maternity care; unintended pregnancy; trends in abortion; access and financing for abortion services; infertility and assistive reproductive technology; and health insurance coverage, preventive services, pregnancy-related services, and abortion policy as they relate to the Affordable Care Act.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Childbirth, Contraception, Costs, Family planning, Financing, HIV infection, Health care reform, Health insurance, Health services, Legislation, Pregnancy, Prevention, Reproductive health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Trends, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

Kaiser Family Foundation. 2010. Emergency contraception [upd. ed.]. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation, 3 pp. (Women's health policy facts; women's fact sheet)

Annotation: The fact sheet provides information on emergency contraception and its use, costs and insurance coverage. It also reviews current national and state polices around emergency contraception, including new methods, recent research findings on access and availability, and user and provider knowledge.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency contraception, Family planning, Reproductive health, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

Guttmacher Institute. 2010. Infant abandonment. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 2 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about legalized infant abandonment and the variations among different states' laws about abandonment. The fact sheet offers background on the legalization of infant abandonment and includes highlights of who can legally relinquish infants, who can accept these infants, and protocols that must be followed.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abandoned children, Infants, Parents, State legislation, Unwanted pregnancy

Boccanfuso C, Moore KA, Whitney C. 2010. Ten ways to promote educational achievement and attainment beyond the classroom. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 13 pp.

Annotation: This research brief brings together findings from a variety of research resources to identify 10 actionable, feasible goals involving non-school factors that affect educational outcomes and can be addressed through out-of-school-time programs. The goals include (1) reduce unintended pregnancies, (2) improve prenatal and postnatal maternal health, (3) improve parenting practices among parents of infants and young children, (4) improve young children's nutrition and encourage mothers to breastfeed, (5) enhance the quality and availability of educational child care, preschool, pre-kindergarten, and full-day kindergarten, (6) connect children and adolescents with long-term mentors, (7) improve parenting practices among parents of school-age children and adolescents, (8) provide family and couples counseling to improve family functioning, (9) provide high-quality educational after-school and summer programs, and (10) develop positive social skills and reduce delinquency among adolescents. The brief describes research findings related to each goal and types of programs that effectively address each goal.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Breastfeeding promotion, Child care, Children, Early childhood education, Educational attainment, Families, Family support services, Infants, Nutrition, Parenting skills, Prenatal care, Prevention, Programs, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health, Young children

Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board. 2010. Reproductive health of urban American Indian and Alaska Native women: Examining unintended pregnancy, contraception, sexual history, and non-voluntary sexual intercourse. Seattle, WA: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, 63 pp.

Annotation: This report presents information from a study on pregnancies, births, sexual history and behavior, contraceptive use, non-voluntary sex, and unintended pregnancy among urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women nationwide.

Contact: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, P.O. Box 3364, Seattle, WA 98114, Telephone: (206) 812-3030 Fax: (206) 812-3044 E-mail: info@uihi.org Web Site: http://www.uihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Childbirth, Pregnancy, Reproductive health, Research, Sexual abuse, Sexual behavior, Sexual intercourse, Unwanted pregnancy, Urban population, Women, Women's health

Maynard RA, ed. 2008. Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy [2nd ed]. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 448 pp.

Annotation: This book consists of a background study of the historical and international trends in adolescent pregnancy and the effects of early pregnancy on the mother's and, eventually, the child's education, work history, and life-long earnings. Seven coordinated studies then focus on specific elements in the data and use statistical projections that take into account other social factors, such as education, race, marital status, cultural background, and neighborhood crime incidence, to estimate the consequences of early pregnancy for the mothers, for the fathers, for the children (health, abuse, incarceration, life chances), and for society. Numerous tables and graphs illustrate the data.

Contact: University Press of America, 4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706, Telephone: (410) 459-3366 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-6420 Web Site: http://www.univpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87766-654-7.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child support, Child welfare, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Employment, Family income, Health care utilization, Incarcerated youth, Low income groups, Maternal age, Pregnant adolescents, Psychosocial predictors, Social support, Statistics, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Frost J, Darroch JE, Remez L. 2008. Improving contraceptive use in the United States. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 8 pp. (In brief; 2008 series, no. 1)

Annotation: This brief report provides information about two surverys undertaken to identify possible strategies for improving contraceptive use in the United States. The report provides background information about unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use, key findings, and recommendations. Statistical data is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. References are included.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Advocacy, Contraceptive use, Economic factors, Miscarriage, Prevention, Public policy, Research, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

National Women's Law Center. 2007. Fact sheet: Emergency contraception. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about emergency contraception (EC). Topics include its time-sensitive nature in preventing pregnancy, the importance of contraception in preventing unwanted pregnancy and family planning, the safety and effectiveness of EC, barriers to obtaining EC, and how to get EC. Footnotes are provided.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptives, Emergency contraception, Family planning, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2007. One in three: The case for wanted and welcomed pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the high rate of unwanted pregnancy among adolescents and young adults and the promotion of responsible behavior and policies that can help reduce unwanted pregnancy and the need for abortion in America. It discusses and promotes education about a range of topics on unwanted pregnancy among adolescents and young adults including work with leaders, policymakers, and program leaders at the national and state levels; the careful and consistent practice of family planning by all who are sexually active and not seeking pregnancy; the role of men in pregnancy prevention and planning; the engagement of entertainment media, faith communities, peers and others; and the support of practical, evidence-based policies. Statistical data are provided in charts and graphs throughout the report. Reference sources are provided along with a list of individuals on the National Campaign advisory groups.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Family life planning, Family planning, Family planning education, Prevention programs, Sexual behavior, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Young adults

Boonstra HD, Gold RB, Richards CL, Finer LB. 2006. Abortion in women's lives. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute , 44 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines the history of reproductive choice in the United States and the role abortion plays in women's lives. Topics include contraception, unintended pregnancy, abortion before legalization, a history of legalized abortion, the long-term safety of abortion, lingering disparities in access to and utilization of abortion services, and recommendations for policies and programs. Additional information and examples are provided from international sources. Appendices include an overview of state policies on abortion and state abortion data. References are provided and statistical data are provided throughout the report.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Family planning, National survey, Policy analysis, Pregnant women, Public policy, Reproductive rights, State surveys, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

Frost J, Sonfield A, Gold RB, Ahmed FH. 2006. Estimating the impact of serving new clients by expanding funding for Title X. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 52 pp. (Occasional report no. 33)

Annotation: This report, which is part of a larger effort by the Guttmacher Institute, examines the potential impact of increased public spending for contraceptive services for low-income women, specifically to estimate the expected impact of expanded funding on the numbers of unintended pregnancies, abortions, and unintended births that would be averted, as well as the cost savings that would be generated. The first component of the effort looked at the potential of various scenarios for expanding Medicaid coverage for contraceptive services. This report looks at the potential impact of expanding funding for Title X of the Public Health Services Act, the only federal program devoted solely to providing publicly supported contraceptive services to women who otherwise would not be able to afford them. The report includes an introduction, methodology, key findings, a discussion, and references. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Childbirth, Contraception, Costs, Family planning, Federal programs, Low income groups, Medicaid, Pregnancy, Public Health Service Act, Research, Title X, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

Salganicoff A, Wentworth B, Ranji U. 2004. Emergency contraception in California: Findings from a 2003 Kaiser Family Foundation survey. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report presents survey findings on knowledge of and attitudes toward emergency contraception among Californians of reproductive age. It also discusses the experiences of Californians in obtaining and using emergency contraceptives. It concludes with a summary of key findings and a discussion of challenges to increasing public awareness of emergency contraceptives to reduce unintended pregnancy. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Emergency contraception, Public opinion, Surveys, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

Richardson J, Schuster MA. 2004. Everything you never wanted your kids to ask about sex (but were afraid they'd ask): The secrets to surviving your child's sexual development from birth to the teens. New York, NY: Three Rivers Press, 448 pp.

Annotation: This book provides guidance to help parents' navigate their child's or adolescent's sexual development. The book presents an overview of the natural history of sexual development; tracks development from early childhood through high school, including child sexual behavior, sexual orientation, puberty, dating, abstinence, safer sex, and sexually active adolescents; and addresses two major risks of engaging in sexual intercourse during adolescence: sexually transmitted disease and unintended pregnancy.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Children, Communication, Contraception, Infants, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Prevention, Sexual behavior, Sexual development, Sexual identity, Sexual intercourse, Sexuality, Sexually transmitted diseases, Unwanted pregnancy

U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General. 2001. The Surgeon General's call to action to promote sexual health and responsible sexual behavior. Rockville, MD: U.S. Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General; Washington, DC: for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended as a framework for advancing a national dialogue on public health issues of sexuality, sexual health, and responsible sexual behavior. It is based on a series of scientific review papers contributed by experts in relevant fields, on recommendations developed at two national conferences, and on extensive review and comment as the document was being prepared. Topics include: the public health problem, the public health approach, risk and protective factors for sexual health, evidence based intervention models, and a vision for the future. A description of the methodology used to produce the report and a list of references are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: GPO 2001-491-194/41008.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Intervention, Pregnancy, Public health, Reproductive health, Responsibility, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexuality, Sexuality education, Sexually transmitted diseases, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 2001. Reproductive health for the 21st century. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 21 pp. (From cells to selves)

Annotation: This report addresses strategic planning goals and objectives relating to issues in reproductive health. These goals are as follows: (1) pursue research leading to improved outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies (ART); (2) use genetic advances to identify factors leading to infertility; (3) use genetic advances to identify novel contraceptive leads; (4) increase efforts to develop acceptable male contraceptives; (5) identify new treatments for common reproductive problems; (6) conduct research on male reproductive behaviors; (7) identify new strategies for improving contraceptive use; (8) study the behavioral factors relating to infertility, the use of infertility services, the ethics of infertility treatment, and the status of children born as a result of ART; and (9) increase knowledge about healthy sexuality. Objectives include reducing the incidence of unwanted pregnancy; progressing toward desired levels of fertility; and reducing morbidity from diseases and disorders of the reproductive system. Additional information is provided on training and education, and a roster of the strategic plan working group members is included.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Information Resource Center, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (866) 760-5947 E-mail: NICHDInformationResourceCenter@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nichd.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Genetic services, Health services, Infertility, Reproductive health, Reproductive technologies, Sexuality, Strategic plans, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Luker K. 1996. Dubious conceptions: The politics of teenage pregnancy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 283 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the current views and beliefs about adolescent pregnancy that influence social policy and political attitudes. The author presents the historical context of adolescent pregnancy and parenthood, and traces how attitudes about and approaches to dealing with these issues have changed. Quotes from the mothers involved illustrate the discussions of why adolescents get pregnant, how it affects the lives and future prospects of the adolescents and those of their babies, how sex education affects their behavior, and the impact of their socioeconomic status and upbringing on their goals and behavior.

Contact: Harvard University Press, 79 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (800) 405-1619 Secondary Telephone: 401-531-2800 Fax: (800) 406-9145 E-mail: contact_hup@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.hup.harvard.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-674-21702-0 .

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Child welfare, Consent, Demography, Educational attainment, Family income, Marital status, Maternal age, Policy development, Pregnant adolescents, Sexual behavior, Sexually transmitted diseases, Social conditions, Social policy, Social values, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Furstenberg FF. 1976. Unplanned parenthood: The social consequences of teenage childbearing. New York: Free Press, 293 pp.

Annotation: This book is an account of the social, economic, and psychological consequences of adolescent motherhood, based on the experiences of a group of young women from pregnancy through the first five years of parenthood. Adolescent mothers, the fathers of their children, their mothers, their children five years after birth, and a comparable group of their classmates who did not become pregnant in adolescence were interviewed. The book addresses questions of the relationship between adolescent pregnancy and various patterns of sex education, relations with parents, educational achievement, financial condition, work goals, what social agencies do for adolescent mothers, what they should be doing, experiences of young mothers who married their child's father vs. those who stayed single or married someone else, and how well-adjusted the offspring of adolescent mothers are compared with other children.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Interviews, Parent child relations, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

CityMatCH. Science-based approaches to preventing teen pregnancy . CityLights. 15(2):1-12. Summer 2006.,

Annotation: This issue of City Lights focuses on science-based approaches to preventing adolescent pregnancy. The issue includes articles on the public health challenge of addressing adolescent pregnancy and childbirth, the role of community helpers in solving the problem of unintended pregnancy, promoting science-based approaching to preventing adolescent pregnancy, sex and HIV education programs for adolescents, and promoting science-based approaching to preventing adolescent pregnancy in Massachusetts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Adolescent pregnancy, Childbirth, Community role, Prevention, Public health, Sexuality education, Unwanted pregnancy

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.