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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (38 total).

Sonfield A, Kost K. 2015. Public costs from unintended pregnancies and the role of public insurance programs in paying for pregnancy-related care: National and state estimates for 2010. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 16 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the methodology used to arrive at these estimates, and presents state and national level data about publicly funded births for unintended pregnancies and public sector costs and potential savings from preventing these pregnancies.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Statistics, Unplanned pregnancy

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Teen pregnancy prevention: Family resource brief (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources about health care for teens and websites for parents, caregivers, and teens about teen pregnancy prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Bibliographies, Contraception, Electronic publications, Families, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2014. What home visitors can do to help their clients achieve adequate birth spacing and avoid unplanned pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 4 pp. (Briefly)

Annotation: This brief for home visitors and for sites implementing home visiting programs provides information on why pregnancy planning and, in particular, adequate birth spacing matters for the health of both women and infants as well as their families. It also offers simple guidance for home visitors on how to discuss pregnancy planning and spacing as part of home visits. Descriptions of relevant resources are also included.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Family health, Family planning, Home visiting, Infant health, Preconception care, Pregnancy prevention, Prevention programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Women

Kaye K, Gootman JA, Ng AS, Finley C. 2014. The benefits of birth control in America: Getting the facts straight. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines the benefits to women, men, children, and society of pregnancy planning and the use of birth control in particular. Topics include reduced unplanned pregnancy and abortion, improved maternal and infant health, improved family well-being, advancement in women's education and employment, and benefits to society.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-082-6.

Keywords: Abortion, Contraception, Costs, Educational attainment, Employment, Family health, Family planning, Infant health, Maternal health, Unplanned pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2014. Unplanned pregnancy among college students and strategies to address it. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 5 pp. (Briefly)

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, College health services, College students, Community participation, Contraception, Intervention, Pregnancy prevention, Unplanned pregnancy, Young adults

Leonard S, Fantroy JD, Lafferty K. 2013. Help me to succeed: A guide for supporting youth in foster care to prevent teen pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy; Atlanta, GA: Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power and Potential, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guide combines messages directly from youth in foster care in Georgia with national research to provide insight and advice to adults working in the child welfare sector. It outlines how understanding a young person's feelings and opinions regarding the risks of early pregnancy and prevention strategies can help child welfare professionals provide more effective support.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Foster care, Georgia, Prevention programs, State programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Welfare services

Arzola F, Diaz HL, Durante Y, Escobar D, Humphreys M, with Marrero, Jr. E, Zareth A, eds. 2013. Countering the silence: A faith leader's toolkit for preventing teen pregnancy. Philadelphia, PA: Esperanza; Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 59 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit includes data and research, as well as Bible studies and suggested activities and ideas on how faith leaders can openly discuss topics such as sex, dating, and relationships with teens and parents from a religious perspective. Available in both English and Spanish, the toolkit includes action steps for faith leaders, a video for youth leaders and senior pastors, assessment tools, and recommended sermon topics for pastors and youth leaders.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Prevention services, Religion, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy

Alan Guttmacher Institute. 2012. Contraceptive services. New York, NY: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 4 pp. (In brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet summarizes statistics on the reproductive health and contraceptive service utilization of U.S. women. Trends in public funding of reproductive health services, particularly Title X-funded programs, as well as a cost-benefit discussion of publicly funded family planning programs are included. Demographic characteristics such as race and marital status are included along with frequency data on sexual activity, contraceptive methods, and pregnancy. A discussion of where women obtain contraceptive services is also included.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Contact Phone: (800) 825-0061 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Contraception, Family planning, Government financing, Health care financing, Public Health Service Act, Sexual behavior, Statistics, Title X, Trends, Unplanned pregnancy

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. 2011. Update on emergency contraception. Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 16 pp. (Clinical proceedings)

Annotation: This monograph provides information on the use of emergency contraception (EC) in the United States. It includes background information and statistics on unintended pregnancies and explains the laws regulating access to emergency contraception (including over-the-counter availability and regulatory status). The monograph describes the types of EC's available in the United States; provides an overview of the literature on the effectiveness of EC's; and discusses the various mechanisms of EC action that prevent pregnancy. Safety issues; the impact of EC's on risk-taking; the impact of EC's on the rate of unintended pregnancies; and the barriers to EC access and use are also discussed. The monograph also examines the role of clinicians and pharmacists as consultants to patients.

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive agents, Contraceptive use, Emergency contraception, Regulations, Unplanned pregnancy

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. 2011. Choosing a birth control method: A quick reference guide for clinicians. Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 88 pp.

Annotation: This reference guide provides information about all the contraceptive methods available in the United States. The guide is intended to help health professionals quickly counsel women about choosing the most appropriate and effective contraception for them. The guide discusses combined hormonal contraception, progestin-only contraception, intrauterine contraception, barrier methods, spermicides, coitus interruptus, fertility awareness, male sterilization, female sterilzation, and emergency contraception,

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Condoms, Contraception, Counseling, Emergency contraception, Prevention, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Kaiser Family Foundation. 2010. Emergency contraception [upd. ed.]. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation, 3 pp. (Women's health policy facts; women's fact sheet)

Annotation: The fact sheet provides information on emergency contraception and its use, costs and insurance coverage. It also reviews current national and state polices around emergency contraception, including new methods, recent research findings on access and availability, and user and provider knowledge.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency contraception, Family planning, Reproductive health, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

Jaccard J. 2009. Unlocking the contraception conundrum: Reducing unplanned pregnancies in emerging adulthood. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 221 pp.

Annotation: This monograph reviews the major literature on contraceptive behavior among unmarried young adults in their twenties. It defines and examines aspects of contraceptive behavior and organizes this examination by applying a general theory of human behavior at the individual level and in the couple dynamic to the study of contraceptive behavior that examines (1) the link between intention and behavior, (2) why some people intend to perform a contraceptive behavior and others do not, (3) personal value and mental health factors, and (4) environmental influences. The report makes recommendations to organizations and contraceptive use promotion programs.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Contraceptive use, Literature reviews, Prevention, Unplanned pregnancy, Young adults

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2009. Science says: Unplanned pregnancy as it relates to women, men, children and society. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 6 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 40)

Annotation: This research brief provides a summary of unplanned pregnancy in the United States along with details about the consequences associated with unplanned pregnancy and what the American public thinks about the issue. The research brief discusses unplanned pregnancy overall, among unmarried women ages 20-29, and as reported by both mothers and fathers.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Fathers, Low income groups, Mother, Prenatal care, Prevention, Single parents, Unplanned pregnancy

Maynard RA, ed. 2008. Kids having kids: Economic costs and social consequences of teen pregnancy [2nd ed]. Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press, 448 pp.

Annotation: This book consists of a background study of the historical and international trends in adolescent pregnancy and the effects of early pregnancy on the mother's and, eventually, the child's education, work history, and life-long earnings. Seven coordinated studies then focus on specific elements in the data and use statistical projections that take into account other social factors, such as education, race, marital status, cultural background, and neighborhood crime incidence, to estimate the consequences of early pregnancy for the mothers, for the fathers, for the children (health, abuse, incarceration, life chances), and for society. Numerous tables and graphs illustrate the data.

Contact: University Press of America, 4501 Forbes Boulevard, Suite 200, Lanham, MD 20706, Telephone: (410) 459-3366 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-6420 Web Site: http://www.univpress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87766-654-7.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Child abuse, Child support, Child welfare, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Employment, Family income, Health care utilization, Incarcerated youth, Low income groups, Maternal age, Pregnant adolescents, Psychosocial predictors, Social support, Statistics, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

Frost J, Darroch JE, Remez L. 2008. Improving contraceptive use in the United States. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 8 pp. (In brief; 2008 series, no. 1)

Annotation: This brief report provides information about two surverys undertaken to identify possible strategies for improving contraceptive use in the United States. The report provides background information about unintended pregnancy and contraceptive use, key findings, and recommendations. Statistical data is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. References are included.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Advocacy, Contraceptive use, Economic factors, Miscarriage, Prevention, Public policy, Research, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Women's health

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2008. The consequences of unplanned pregngancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 3 pp. (Fast facts)

Annotation: This fact sheet lists some of the consequences of unplanned pregnancy related to child health and development; parents and relationships; preconception care, prenatal care, and infant health; child health and development and family environment; and mothers.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Child development, Child health, Families, Infant health, Mental health, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parents, Postpartum depression, Preconception care, Prenatal care, Relationships, Unplanned pregnancy

O'Brien J, Bensyl D, Gilbert BC, D'Angelo D, Angus L, Whitehead N, PRAMS Working Group. 2008. PRAMS and unintended pregnancy. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses the impact of unintended pregnancy on women and children and why measuring unintended pregnancy is important. It also discusses the prevalence rates and trends of unintended pregnancies resulting in live births, maternal characteristics, contraception's role in unintended pregnancy and trends and prevalence in contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 3033, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-6450 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/prams

Keywords: Contraception, Family planning, Maternal behavior, PRAMS, Statistical data, Trends, Unplanned pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2008. Science says: Unplanned pregnancy and family turmoil. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 6 pp. (Putting what works to work; no. 34)

Annotation: This research brief explores the link between unplanned births and relationship turmoil and conflict within the family. The brief also provides background information about unplanned pregnancy in the United States.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Parent child relations, Prenatal care, Relationships, Single parents, Stress, Unplanned pregnancy

National Women's Law Center. 2007. Fact sheet: Emergency contraception. Washington, DC: National Women's Law Center, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about emergency contraception (EC). Topics include its time-sensitive nature in preventing pregnancy, the importance of contraception in preventing unwanted pregnancy and family planning, the safety and effectiveness of EC, barriers to obtaining EC, and how to get EC. Footnotes are provided.

Contact: National Women's Law Center, 11 Dupont Circle. N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 588-5180 Fax: (202) 588-5185 E-mail: info@nwlc.org Web Site: http://www.nwlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptives, Emergency contraception, Family planning, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. 2007. One in three: The case for wanted and welcomed pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the high rate of unwanted pregnancy among adolescents and young adults and the promotion of responsible behavior and policies that can help reduce unwanted pregnancy and the need for abortion in America. It discusses and promotes education about a range of topics on unwanted pregnancy among adolescents and young adults including work with leaders, policymakers, and program leaders at the national and state levels; the careful and consistent practice of family planning by all who are sexually active and not seeking pregnancy; the role of men in pregnancy prevention and planning; the engagement of entertainment media, faith communities, peers and others; and the support of practical, evidence-based policies. Statistical data are provided in charts and graphs throughout the report. Reference sources are provided along with a list of individuals on the National Campaign advisory groups.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Family life planning, Family planning, Family planning education, Prevention programs, Sexual behavior, Sexuality education, Unplanned pregnancy, Unwanted pregnancy, Young adults

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.