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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of MCH Workforce Development. [2014]. Division of MCH Workforce Development: 2012–2020 strategic plan. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, 8 pp.

Annotation: This strategic plan includes goals, strategies, activities and performance measures to support efforts of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's Division of MCH Workforce Development to assure that all children, youth, and families will live and thrive in healthy communities served by a quality workforce that helps assure their health and well-being.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2340 Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-initiatives/workforce-training Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, Federal agencies, Strategic plans, Training, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Work force

Harwood R, Yu S, Kavanagh L. 2012 (ca.). Remembering our past, building the future: 100 years of the Maternal and Child Health Research Program. Unpublished paper, 49 pp.

Annotation: This three-part paper provides an overview of the 100-year history and mission of the federal Maternal and Child Health Research program, beginning with its origins in the U.S. Children’s Bureau in 1912 through the present day. Part 1 of the paper covers the period from the founding of the Bureau in 1912 through the Social Security Act of 1935, with special attention to the ways in which research findings motivated changes in policies and practice. Part 2 covers the years from 1935 through 1969, with special attention to the vision underlying the extramural MCH research program (established in 1963), and the impact of the 1969 reorganization of the Children’s Bureau, which moved the MCH Research Program into the Public Health Services into what is now the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Part 3 (1969-2012) focuses on the mission of the MCH Research program, how that has been realized in the past and present, and what we can learn from that for the future.

Keywords: History, MCH research, Research programs, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Hutchins VL. 1994. History of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau: A presentation to the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 videotape.

Annotation: This VHS videotape of Dr. Vince L. Hutchins' brown bag presentation at the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health gives an overview of the history of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Dr. Hutchins discusses the cycles of funding for maternal and child health issues over eight decades and the impact that socioeconomic factors have had on MCH program development. Discussion after the presentation focuses on the potential effects of health care reform on maternal and child health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Child health, Children's Bureau, Early intervention services, Federal MCH programs, Federal grants, Federal programs, Health care reform, History, Legislation, Maternal health, Social factors, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Videotapes

National Association of County Health Officials. 1994. Women's health information source book. Washington, DC: National Association of County Health Officials, 173 pp.

Annotation: This notebook contains essays, fact sheets, and contact information designed to inform local health officials about issues relating to women's and children's health. Topics covered include: addictive behaviors, adolescent health, advocacy, chronic diseases, cultural issues, infectious diseases, mature women's health, mental health, occupational health, reproductive health, socioeconomic issues, and violence against women. The essays were written by the staff of the National Association of County Health Officials and the fact sheets describe the activities of the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the U.S. Office of Women's Health. It also contains materials about in-service training, information that can be used in advocacy efforts, supplemental materials for clients, and a resource list of national and regional organizations and programs. The materials are being developed on an on-going basis; not all of the topics included have materials available currently. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health promotion, Child health, Child health promotion, Directories, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, U.S. Office of Women's Health, Women's health, Women's health promotion

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1994. Celebrating 60 years of serving America's children and families. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 poster (20 x 24 inches).

Annotation: This poster shows an abstract figure of a dancing adult and child in the sunshine. It celebrates the 60th anniversary of the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHH089.

Keywords: Anniversaries, Audiovisual materials, Child health, Maternal health, Posters, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1993-1994. Maternal and Child Health Bureau fact pack. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 29 fact sheets.

Annotation: This information package contains twenty-nine fact sheets that describe the organization and operations of the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. One fact sheet presents an organizational chart which places the Bureau in the hierarchy of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and indicates the divisions and branches within the Bureau itself. Another fact sheet describes the overall functions of the Bureau and the remaining 27 fact sheets describe its activities with regard to various health issues and initiatives. In 1996, the information found on the fact sheets was mounted on the following Web site: http://www.os.dhhs.gov/hrsa/mchb/. A previous edition of this publication was called the "Information Fact Pack."

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, MCH programs, MCH research, MCH services, MCH training, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1993-1994. Information fact pack. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 12 fact sheets.

Annotation: This information package contains 12 fact sheets on the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and its programs and services. Topics include maternal and child health research and training, the genetic services program, injury prevention, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program, Community Integrated Service Systems (CISS), emergency medical services for children (EMSC), pediatric AIDS, Healthy Start, and Minority Adolescent Health Program. Contact names and telephone numbers are given for those who require further information. A subsequent edition is called Maternal and Child Health Bureau Fact Pack.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, MCH programs, MCH research, MCH services, MCH training, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Lewin-VHI, and MDS Associates. 1993. Health care reform issues: Discussion paper for the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. Fairfax, VA: Lewin-ICF and MDS Associates, 101 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this paper is to provide the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) an overview and assessment of the key features of health care reform that are likely to have implications for the maternal and child populations and MCH programs. Drafts of two additional background papers are appended: one profiles the maternal and child population, and the other indicates the role of MCHB in the financing and delivering health care for women and children. There are several bibliographies.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: Contr. no. 240-91-0010; D.O. no. 240-92-0509.

Keywords: Federal government, Government programs, Government role, Health care financing, Health care reform, Public policy, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Children's Safety Network. 1992. Injury prevention outlook: An assessment of injury prevention in state maternal and child health agencies. Newton, MA: Education Development Center, Children's Safety Network, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of an assessment of the status of state maternal and child health injury prevention program activities. The authors outline key elements of a comprehensive statewide injury prevention program developed by the Children's Safety Network. These elements provide the framework to support the assessment. Following are the key measurements of the assessment: inclusion of an injury prevention coordinator within maternal and child health agencies; funding; advocacy; needs assessment; data improvement; an intervention plan; support and guidance for local programs; evaluation; and collaboration. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Single copies available at no charge.

Keywords: Coalitions, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, Data, Evaluation, Financing, Health professionals, Needs assessment, Planning, Programmatic issues, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 1992. Toward the year 2000: A five year strategic plan for the Special Projects of Regional and National Significance and Community Integrated Service Systems Grant Programs. (official draft). Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 76 pp.

Annotation: This draft strategic plan covers the Special Projects of Regional and National Significance (SPRANS) program and the Community Integrated Service Systems (CISS) program for fiscal years 1992 to 1997, outlining the programs' goals, objectives and action steps. The appendices include a glossary of common abbreviations, the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's (MCHB's) mission statement, its departmental priorities, data on the population served by these programs, legislative information about the programs, a discussion of the administration of the programs, and a schedule of actions to implement the plan.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Community health services, Federal MCH programs, Health care systems, Program planning, Service coordination, Strategic plans, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Nelkin VS. [1991]. Improving services for culturally diverse populations: Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs—Division activities/FY 1990-1991. St. Paul, MN: Pathfinder Resources, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's commitment to serving culturally diverse populations and defines the Bureau's perceptions of cultural sensitivity and cultural competence as background for examining the activities of the Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs during fiscal year 1990–91. The report describes the activities of the division's three branches (Habilitative Services, Genetic Services, and Hemophilia and the Pediatric AIDS Program) and enumerates programs within these branches that focus on specific cultural groups. In part, these include grant activities funded as special projects of regional and national significance (SPRANS), grant application guidance, programs by national maternal and child health resource centers, national leadership activities, and national conferences. The descriptions of the SPRANS activities include the name of the service, the state and target population, and a brief overview of the program. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Federal MCH programs, Program descriptions, SPRANS, Service delivery, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Seidel JS, Henderson DP, eds. 1991. Emergency medical services for children: A report to the nation. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 168 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines the key problems resulting from deficiencies in emergency medical services for children (EMSC) in the United States, and the major goals of EMSC development. It presents specific issues which must be addressed in planning EMSC: education, financing, data collection, injury prevention, quality assurance, and rehabilitation. Sections include: History of Emergency Medical Services for Children; A Systems Approach to Care; Education and Training of Professionals and the Public; Rehabilitation: Meeting the Challenge; Injury Prevention: Strategies for Change; Quality Improvement: A Continuum of Responsibility; Data Collection and Analysis: A Collaborative Effort; Financing Emergency Medical Services for Children: Identifying Resources; The Year of the Child in Emergency Medical Services; and The Medical Home: Closing the Circle of Care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE010.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Education, Emergency medical services for children, Injury prevention, Rehabilitation, Research methodology, Training, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

University of Illinois at Chicago, School of Public Health, Community Health Sciences, Maternal and Child Health Training Program. 1988. Making change happen: Working together—Third annual maternal and child health leadership conference. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Maternal and Child Health Training Program,

Annotation: These conference proceedings include the presentations made at the third annual Maternal and Child Health Leadership Conference for regions V and VII. Topics covered include minority health, the role of government in providing for children's health care, AIDS, P.L. 99-457, child injury prevention, dental public health, data systems, MCH/WIC/Medicaid cooperation, Head Start, use of the MCH block grant in meeting the 1990 goals, child care, home care for special children, liability and risk management, media utilization, rural adolescent health, child abuse prevention, lead poisoning, and the 1990 national health objectives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Maternal and Child Health Program, 1603 West Taylor Street (M-C923), Chicago, IL 60612-7259, Telephone: (312) 996-0724 Fax: (312) 996-3551 Web Site: http://www.uic.edu/sph/mch Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHD061.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child care, Child health, Injury prevention, Lead poisoning, Mass media, Professional education, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Thomas JN, Rogers CM, Lloyd D, Sihlangu R. 1985. Child sexual abuse: Implications for public health practice. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Maternal and Child Health, 28 pp. (Information Bulletin)

Annotation: This 1985 technical information bulletin was prepared under a MCHB grant and is directed to health professionals, particularly those in public health. It urges their attention to and recognition of child sexual abuse as a public health problem. Topics presented include: arriving at a widely accepted definition of child sexual abuse; scope of the problem; identifying families and/or victims; risk factors; and levels of public health prevention efforts (primary, secondary, tertiary). How and why child sexual abuse cases enter the public health system is discussed along with prevention levels appropriate at time of that entry. Secondary prevention is frequently level at which cases enter they system, and at that point, may involve interviews, medical exams, physical finds, sexually transmitted diseases, psychosocial considerations, legal considerations and treatment. The need for training of public health professionals is explored, including improving their knowledge of child development, their ability to identify, collect and document evidence, and their ability to testify in court situations. These providers should also be mindful of cultural and ethnic values and differences. Professionals should also be in position to disseminate educational information, set up screenings for potential health problems, to sponsor training in conjunction with existing social service and law enforcement programs, and to develop primary prevention interventions. Rationale for all of these positions is discussed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Advocacy, Anticipatory guidance, Child sexual abuse, Consumer education, Education, Health professionals, Injury prevention, Population surveillance, Resources for professionals, Training, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.