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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 12 (12 total).

[U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services]. 2016. Serving special populations: Rural areas–Fast facts for assisters. [Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services], 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for people who assist health care consumers living in rural areas provides information about health insurance eligibility and enrollment barriers and what assisters can do to bolster education and outreach efforts in rural areas. Scenarios and resources are included.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Communication, Community participation, Costs, Family support services, Health insurance, Outreach, Relationships, Resources for professionals, Rural populations, Transportation, Trust

Coalition for Community Schools, Communities in Schools, Strive Together. 2016. Aligning networks to enable every student to thrive. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document describes progress toward educational equity and opportunities to achieve shared goals by aligning assets and expertise across networks, school districts, and communities. Contents include a unifying concept of student-centered education and five principles for driving the work. Topics include trusting relationships, cross-sector partnerships, purposeful engagement, actionable data, and shared accountability.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Collaboration, Community action, Data, Education, Equal opportunities, Ethnic groups, Networking, Policy development, Poverty, Public private partnerships, Race, Social support, Trust

Truong Q. 2016. Place matters: Perceived neighborhood safety and social support during childhood and its impact on mental health in Philadelphia–A GIS analysis of children's population health needs and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center and the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, 34 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of children's population health needs and resources in Philadelphia. Contents include findings from statistical and spatial (mapping) analyses to better understand the effects of modifiable neighborhood characteristics on mental health and a proposed method for using population-level risk factors to assess service need and adequacy of community resources.

Contact: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Web Site: http://www.scattergoodfoundation.org Out of print.

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Labeling, Mental disorders, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Research methodology, Risk factors, Social support, Trust

Farrukh A, Sadwick R, Villasenor J. 2014. Youth internet safety: Risks, responses, and research recommendations. Washington, DC: Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of research representative of the depth and breadth of publications addressing child and youth online safety. Contents include an analysis of key findings, knowledge gaps, and policy recommendations. Topics include cyberbullying, sexual solicitation and unwanted exposure to sexual content, the role of privacy, parent and community involvement, and intergenerational gaps in attitudes toward internet safety issues.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communication, Confidentiality, Internet, Interpersonal relations, Measures, Online systems, Policy development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Research, Risk factors, Safety, Sexual harassment, Trust

Cashman J, Linehan P, Purcell L, Rosser M, Schultz S, Skalski S. 2014. Leading by convening: A blueprint for authentic engagement. Alexandria, VA: National Association of State Directors of Special Education, 101 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a strategy of partnership that builds connections and fosters authentic engagement through convening and shared leadership. Topics include building engagement, coalescing around issues, ensuring relevant participation, doing the work together, and meeting to co-create tools and learning activities. Tools and learning activities are included.

Contact: National Association of State Directors of Special Education, , 225 Reinekers Lane, Suite 420, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 519-3800 Fax: (703) 519-3808 Web Site: http://www.nasdse.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitude change, Behavior change, Collaboration, Leadership, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Social learning, Trust

Foster Care and Adoption Resource Center and Adoption Resources of Wisconsin. 2011. Helping children in care build trusting relationships. West Allis, WI: Foster Care and Adoption Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet outlines the many reasons foster children and youth struggle to develop trust, including trauma or ambiguous or unresolved loss or grief. The tip sheet also includes advice for parents working with their foster or adoptive children on building trust, personal stories from children in foster care, and a list of resources and links.

Contact: Foster Care and Adoption Resource Center, Adoption Resources of Wisconsin, 6682 West Greenfield, Suite 310, West Allis, WI 53214, Telephone: (800) 947-8074 Secondary Telephone: (414) 475-1246 Fax: (414) 475-7007 E-mail: info@wifostercareandadoption.org Web Site: http://wifostercareandadoption.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child behavior, Foster children, Parent child relations, Parent support services, Trust

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2010. Communicating effectively about vaccines: New communication resources for health officials. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 28 pp.

Annotation: This document presents results of a study to identify better ways to communicate with parents, policy makers, media, and the public about the benefits and safety of vaccines. The study was aimed at vaccine-hesitant parents and core influencers of these parents. The document discusses how to understand the target audiences, key messages, and creative advertising concepts. The messages were developed using surveys and focus groups with the target audiences.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beliefs, Communication, Immunization, National surveys, Parenting attitudes, Public opinion, Trust

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2010. Communicating effectively about vaccines: Summary of a survey of U.S. parents and guardians. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document for state and territorial health officials summarizes results from a survey of U.S. parents and guardians to gather information about reasons for delaying or refusing vaccines. Contents include demographic, geographic and attitudinal profiles of respondents; reasons for opposing or supporting vaccinations; ratings of messages about vaccinations; sources of influence; and discussion and conclusion.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beliefs, Communication, Immunization, National surveys, Parenting attitudes, Public opinion, Trust

De Rosa C, Cantrell J, Havens A, Hawk J, Jenkins L. 2007. Sharing, privacy, and trust in our networked world: A report to the OCLC membership. Dublin, OH: OCLC, ca. 280 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on a study that explored the social networking attitudes and habits of users and librarians. The reports explored the following main areas: (1) user practices and preferences on their favorite social spaces; (2) the origins of social networking; (3) user attitudes about privace and trust online; (4) librarian online habits and attitudes vs. the habits and attitudes of the general public; and (5) attitudes about combining the benefits of social spaces with the offerings of libraries. The report also discusses in-depth interviews with information services professionals to gain insight into social networking, trust, and privacy online. Report highlights and conclusions are offered. The report includes six appendices: (1) college students' use of Internet services; (2) glossary, (3) people consulted, (4) readings and other sources, (5) about OCLC, and (6) comparative timeline.

Contact: OCLC Online Computer Library Center, 6565 Kilgour Place, Dublin, OH 43017-3395, Telephone: (614) 764-6000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 848-5878 Fax: (614) 764-6096 E-mail: oclc@oclc.org Web Site: http://www.oclc.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-55653-370-5.

Keywords: Attitudes, Consumers, Librarians, Libraries, Social behavior, Trust, World Wide Web

Kiefer H, Cohen N, Pape B. 2004. Handle with care: Strategies for promoting the mental health of young children in community-based child care. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Canadian Mental Health Association and Hinks-Dellcrest Centre, 39 pp.

Annotation: This booklet, which is geared toward child care workers, supervisors, and directors, focuses on how mental health promotion can take place in the child care setting. Topics include developing trust, building positive self-esteem, expressing emotions, challenges and problem solving, relationships, respecting diversity, change and transitions, practitioner well-being, environment, and guiding practices. Examples of effective practices are provided. The booklet is available in English and French.

Contact: Canadian Mental Health Association, 1110-151 Slater Street, Ottowa, Ontario, Canada K1P5H3, Fax: (613) 745-5522 Web Site: http://www.cmha.ca Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-894886-13-5.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Child care workers, Cultural diversity, Emotions, Health promotion, Mental health, Non English language materials, Relationships, Self esteem, Trust

Schoenberg J, Riggins T, Salmond K. 2003. Feeling safe: What girls say. [New York, NY]: Girl Scouts of the USA, 124 pp., exec. summ. (23 pp.).

Annotation: This report addresses question about what safety means to girls, what it takes to make them feel safe, and why feeling safe matters. These questions include (1) how do girls define safety?, (2) what do girls consider safe and unsafe situations?, (3) how does feeling unsafe impact quality of life issues?, and (4) what strategies do girls use to cope with physically and emotionally unsafe situations? The report is divided into the following sections: (1) defining safety, (2) experiencing safety, (3) relationships, trust, and safety, (4) safety and everyday functioning, (5) group experiences, and (6) coping, resources, and solutions. Implications of the information are also discussed. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report incudes three appendices: (1) methodology, (2) moderator's guide and homework assignment, and (3) questionnaire. References and resources are included, as well.

Contact: Girl Scouts of the USA, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018-2798, Telephone: (800) 478-7248 Secondary Telephone: (212) 852-8000 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.girlscouts.org Summary available from the website; contact publisher for full report.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent females, Adolescent mental health, Child attitudes, Child mental health, Female children, Relationships, Safety, Trust

Able-Peterson,T, Bucy J. 1993. The streetwork outreach training manual. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, 149 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended as a guide for action for people concerned about runaway, homeless youth. It describes why children run away, and how they live on the streets, including case histories. It then tells how some workers are able to reach out to the children, gain their trust, and help them to make productive lives. It describes some successful programs, and gives resources.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, NW, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html $7.00 includes shipping and handling.

Keywords: Adolescents, Counseling, Hunger, Mental health, Outreach, Prevention, Prostitution, Runaways, Shelters, Training, Trust

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.