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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (27 total).

Institute for Family-Centered Care. n.d.. Focus group on ACTG 076: Summary report. Bethesda, MD: Institute for Family-Centered Care, 10 pp.

Annotation: This summary report is from a focus group convened to discuss issues related to the use of ACTG 076 to treat HIV-infected pregnant women. The chief issues covered are: women's attitudes about health care providers and the health care system; information and informed decision making; and counseling and testing. Implications, conclusions and recommended are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Institute for Patient and Family-Centered Care, 7900 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 405, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 652-0281, ext. 16 Fax: (301) 652-0186 E-mail: institute@ipfcc.org Web Site: http://www.familycenteredcare.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitudes, Counseling, HIV, HIV infected patients, Pediatric HIV, Pregnant women, Testing, Treatment outcome, Treatment refusal

Sama-Miller E, Akers L, Mraz-Esposito A, Zukiewicz M, Avellar S, Paulsell D, Del Grosso P. 2017. Home visiting evidence of effectiveness review: Executive summary. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 20 pp. (OPRE report no. 2017-29)

Annotation: This document provides an overview of the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) review process and a summary of the review results. Contents include a summary of evidence of effectiveness by model and outcome domain, a summary of implementation guidelines for program models with evidence of effectiveness, and a discussion of gaps in the home visiting research literature. The appendix contains a list of the program models reviewed.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, MCH research, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Treatment effectiveness evaluation

Pennsylvania Medical Society and Pennsylvania Dental Association. 2016. Pennsylvania guidelines on the use of opioids in dental practice. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Medical Society, 4 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are intended to help health professionals improve patient outcomes and avoid potential adverse outcomes associated with using opioids to treat acute dental pain. Contents include how to incorporate key practices into caring for patients receiving opioids for pain.

Contact: Pennsylvania Medical Society, 777 East Park Drive, P.O. Box 8820, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8820, Telephone: (717) 558-7750 Secondary Telephone: (800) 228-7823 Fax: (717) 558-7830 E-mail: stat@pamedsoc.org Web Site: https://www.pamedsoc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Dental care, Dentistry, Opiates, Oral health, Pain, Palliative treatment, Patient care, Pennsylvania, Treatment outcome

Blumenthal D, Malphrus E, McGinnis JM, eds; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Core Metrics for Better Health at Lower Cost. 2015. Vital signs: Core metrics for health and health care progress. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 380 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a set of core measures for health and health care and describes how their focused implementation can contribute to reducing the burden of measurement on clinicians; enhance transparency and comparability; and improve health outcomes nationwide. Contents include a summary of issues, options, and successful strategies with respect to advancing measurement and enhancing collaborative efforts around measurement in the four domains of healthy people, quality of care, costs of care, and people’s engagement in health and health care. The evidence is distilled into detailed findings throughout the report. Recommendations describe key goals for advancing measurement and are accompanied by specific strategies that stakeholders should undertake in implementing the recommendation.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-32493-9.

Keywords: Barriers, Comparative analysis, Costs, Measures, Policy development, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Treatment outcome

National Institute of Mental Health, Office of Autism Research Coordination. 2014. Report to Congress on activities related to autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities under the Combating Autism Act of 2006 and Combating Autism Reauthorization Act of 2011 (FY2010–FY2012). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 104 pp.

Annotation: This annual report, required by public law, describes progress and expenditures made in autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-related research and services activities across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Science Foundation. Topics include progress and expenditures; prevalence of ASD; average age of diagnosis; average age for intervention; average time between screening, diagnosis, and intervention; effectiveness and outcomes of interventions; and adult services and supports. The appendices contain a list of acronyms, a summary of the previous report, and related publications.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee, 200 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20201, E-mail: iaccpublicinquiries@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://iacc.hhs.gov/ Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS 14-8012.

Keywords: Autism, Costs, Early intervention, Family support services, Federal legislation, Interagency cooperation, Prevalence, Research, Screening, Treatment outcome

McCoy C. 2014. State Title V program approaches to improving birth outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 24 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on efforts to reduce non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks gestation and methods that state Title V maternal and child health (MCH) programs are using to improve birth outcomes. Topics include national and state initiatives to make lowering the number of non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks a priority; the role of state Title V MCH programs in implementing quality improvement programs and payment reforms; and examples from California, North Carolina, and Texas. The appendix contains a matrix of national and regional initiatives to improve birth outcomes including a description, geographic scope, funding, and partners for each initiative.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, National initiatives, Prematurity, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Regional programs, Reimbursement, State MCH programs, Treatment outcome

Wirth B, Townley C, Takach M. 2014. A roadmap for state policymakers to use comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research to inform decision making . Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 49 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help policymakers with varying levels of experience understand and use comparative effectiveness research (CER) and patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR). Contents include a legend to orient those new to CER and PCOR and steps for using this research in state policymaking. Topics include identifying when CER and PCOR can inform policymaking, finding research and other relevant resources, evaluating the evidence, using the evidence to design program or policy, communicating and disseminating the decision, and monitoring and evaluating new research as it becomes available. Case studies and sample applications for each step are included. The appendices contain additional sources of research, guides, and tools; a list of suggested reading on CER, PCOR, and evidence-based decision-making; and an overview on conducting a systematic review.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Decision making, Policy development, Program development, Public policy, Research methodology, Research reviews, Treatment outcome

National Institutes of Health. 2013. Patient Reported Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This system provides clinicians and researchers access to validated adult- and child-reported (self-reported) measures of health and well–being. Contents include tools to measure what clients are able to do and how they feel by asking questions. Information about the system methodology (publications and presentations, data, review, and testing); software; and related resources is also included.

Contact: National Institutes of Health, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892, Telephone: (301) 496-4000 Secondary Telephone: (301) 402-9612 Fax: (301) 496-0017 E-mail: NIHInfo@OD.NIH.GOV Web Site: http://www.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Forms, Measures, Outcome and process assessment, Quality assurance, Questionnaires, Research, Treatment effectiveness evaluation

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2013. Promoting recovery and independence for older adolescents and young adults who experience serious mental health challenges: National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day–May 9, 2013. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report describes how the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA's) programs and services positively impact older adolescents and young adults with mental health challenges. The report addresses the following domains: employment, housing, education, social connectedness, and emotional well-being. Data and statistics from SAMHSA's Children's Mental Health Initiative and Emerging Adults Initiative are presented throughout the report.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HHS Publicaton no. SMA-13-4756.

Keywords: Adolescents, Data, Federal initiatives, Mental health programs, Mental health services, Treatment outcome, Young adults

National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. The Pediatrix BabySteps Clinical Data Warehouse (CDW): Implications for the future of neonatal care. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 9)

Annotation: This webinar presents an overview of a large-scale database that allows the analysis of clinical information collected from physicians using the Pediatrix Medical Group's electronic health record, called BabySteps, in neonatal intensive care units throughout the United States. Topics include how digital documentation of care in the clinical data warehouse is used to assess treatment outcomes, develop strategies to improve care, and promote meaningful changes in clinical practices to continuously enhance the quality of neonatal care.

Contact: National Coalition for Infant Health, Alliance for Patient Access, 1275 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1100A, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 499-4114 E-mail: info@infanthealth.org Web Site: http://www.infanthealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Databases, Multimedia, Neonatal intensive care, Quality assurance, Research, Treatment outcome

Partnership for Clear Health Communication. 2011. Ask Me 3®. North Adams, MA: National Patient Safety Foundation, Partnership for Clear Health Communication, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to promote communication between health professionals and their clients to improve health outcomes including oral health outcomes. Contents include an implementation guide, brochure, button, key tag, note pad, pen, flier, and poster. The brochure, key tag, flier, and poster are available in English and Spanish. A video in English with Spanish captioning is also available.

Contact: National Patient Safety Foundation, , 268 Summer Street, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02210, Telephone: (617) 391-9900 Fax: (617) 391-9999 E-mail: info@npsf.org Web Site: http://www.npsf.org $100 for 100 brochures; $25 for 50 key tags; $35 for 25 note pads; $25 for 5 posters; $85 for 100 buttons; fact sheets available from the website at http://www.npsf.org/?page=healthliterac.

Keywords: Communication, Consumer education, Health education, Health literacy, Health services delivery, Multimedia, Resources for professionals, Safety, Spanish language materials, Treatment outcome

Berkman ND, Sheridan SL, Donahue KE, Halpern DJ, Viera A, Crotty K, Holland A, Brasure M, Lohr KN, Harden E, Tant K, Wallace I, Viswanathan M. 2011. Health literacy interventions and outcomes: An updated systematic review. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 245 pp., plus appendices. (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 199)

Annotation: This report updates a 2004 systematic review of health care service use and health outcomes related to differences in health literacy level and interventions designed to improve these outcomes for individuals with low health literacy. Disparities in health outcomes and effectiveness of interventions among different sociodemographic groups were also examined.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Health care utilization, Health literacy, Intervention, Research, Treatment outcome

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Trans-agency Working Group on the Health Effects of Dental Amalgam. 2004. Review and analysis of the literature on the potential health effects of dental amalgams: Executive summary. Bethesda, MD: Life Sciences Research Office, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes a review of the peer-reviewed, primary scientific and medical literature published between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2003 that contributed to an understanding and evaluation of the potential adverse human health effects that may be caused by dental amalgam. Contents include background information on the controversy surrounding dental amalgam safety, the approach to the problem, and conclusions. Research gaps are also addressed.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Dental care, Literature reviews, Oral health, Outcome evaluation, Product safety, Research, Treatment outcome

Worthington JE, Hernandez M, Friedman B, Uzzell, D, Joseph R, MacAlister JE, Armstrong K, Boterf E, Goff T, Tolin C. 2001. Learning from families: Identifying service strategies for success. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 85 pp. (Systems of care: Promising practices in children's mental health, 2001 series; v. 2)

Annotation: This volume is second in the 2001 series of monographs of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program, a federal grant program that assists communities in building fully inclusive organized systems of care for children who are experiencing a serious emotional disturbance and their families. The monograph reports on a study of grantee programs which aimed to identify what constitutes successful treatment from the point of view of the families and the services that promote success for children and families being served by a system of care. Appendices include grant community profiles and benefits of parent involvement in the study.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (888) 457-1551 Fax: E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://cecp.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Children, Families, Federal programs, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation, Treatment outcome

Simpson JS, Jivanjee P, Koroloff N, Doerfler A, Garcia M. 2001. Promising practices in early childhood mental health. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 115 pp. (Systems of care: Promising practices in children's mental health, 2001 series; v. 3)

Annotation: This volume is third in the 2001 series of monographs of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program, a federal grant program that assists communities in building fully inclusive organized systems of care for children who are experiencing a serious emotional disturbance and their families. The monograph describes innovative ways in which systems of care serving very young children and their families are designing and delivering services. Innovative services were identified through a literature review and visits to four grantee sites and a community-based early childhood mental health service delivery site. The monograph describes the literature review and the site visits. Appendices include the following: concepts related to early childhood mental health, the site visit protocol, principles for early childhood mental health from the literature, examples of promising practices, and a program model for responding to families in early childhood mental health.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (888) 457-1551 Fax: E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://cecp.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Case studies, Families, Federal programs, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation, Treatment outcome, Young children

McCormick MC, Siegel JE. 1999. Prenatal care: Effectiveness and implementation. Port Chester, NY: Cambridge University Press, 363 pp.

Annotation: This book, written for maternal and child health professionals, policymakers, and health care managers, evaluates the effectiveness of prenatal care interventions and provides a framework for prenatal care that looks beyond the perspective of immediate neonatal outcomes to the broader public health issues. Topics covered in this book include prenatal care and complications of pregnancy, preventing prematurity, new findings and long-term evidence on intrauterine growth restriction, preventing and treating birth defects, and prenatal care as an integral component of women's health care. Also included is a summary of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of prenatal care.

Contact: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, Telephone: 212-924-3900 Secondary Telephone: (914) 937-9600 Fax: 212-691-3239 E-mail: information@cup.org Web Site: http://www.cambridge.org/us/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-521-66196-X.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Cost effectiveness, Outcome evaluation, Pregnancy complications, Prematurity, Prenatal care, Treatment outcome

U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. 1999. Screening and assessing adolescents for substance use disorders. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 136 pp. (Treatment improvement protocol (TIP) series; 31)

Annotation: This report is a companion report of Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 32, one of a series of best practices guidelines to help treatment providers design and deliver better services to adolescent clients with substance abuse disorders. The report concentrates on the strategies, procedures, and instruments that are appropriate for the initial detection of substance use in adolescents, the comprehensive assessment of their problems, and subsequent treatment planning. Sections include the executive summary and recommendations; an introduction to the terms, models, and assessment instruments used in the report; preliminary screening of adolescents; comprehensive assessment for referral and treatment; legal issues; and screening and assessment in juvenile justice settings. The appendices include a bibliography; an extensive selection of screening instrument summaries, both general and comprehensive, and instruments for general functioning domains; drug identification and testing in the juvenile justice system; and a list of field reviewers.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (SMA) 99-3344.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Assessment, Health personnel, High risk adolescents, Program descriptions, Protocols, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusers, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening, Treatment outcome

National Resource Network for Child and Family Mental Health Services, ed. 1999. A compilation of lessons learned from the 22 grantees of the 1997 Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families program. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 124 pp. (Systems of care: Promising practices in children's mental health, 1998 series, v. 7)

Annotation: This volume is seventh in the 1998 series of monographs of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program, a federal grant program that assists communities in building fully inclusive organized systems of care for children who are experiencing a serious emotional disturbance and their families. In this monograph, grantees share their experiences and lessons learned in five main areas: family involvement /empowerment, cultural competence, systems of care, evaluation, and managed care.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (888) 457-1551 Fax: E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://cecp.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Case studies, Families, Federal programs, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation, Treatment outcome, Young children

Florida Panhandle Healthy Start, Partners for a Healthy Baby. 1997 (ca.). Goals and objectives: Partners for a Healthy Baby Training Institute management plan. Tallahassee, FL: Florida State University Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy, Partners for a Healthy Baby , 11 pp. (xxx)

Annotation: This management document lists major goals with a plan for achieving each of them. Each goal and specific objective for that goal is accompanied by a chart which presents implementation information about activities, timeframes, units of measure, and responsible persons. Major goals include the following: 1) promote physical, cognitive, social and emotional growth of infants and toddlers and prepare them for future growth and development; 2) support parents in their role as primary caregivers and educators of their children, and in meeting family goals and achieving self-sufficiency across a wide variety of domains; 3) establish a process for ongoing quality assurance and improvement in all aspects of the program; and 4) develop highly trained, caring and effective program staff. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Florida Panhandle Healthy Start, 1339 East Lafayette Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Telephone: (850) 922-1300 Contact Phone: (850) 922-1300 Fax: (850) 922-1352 Contact Fax: xxx E-mail: mgraham@mailer.fsu.edu Contact E-mail: graham@mailer.fsu.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Access to health care, Case management, Child abuse, Child development, Child health, Community based services, Curricula, Early intervention, Family planning, Florida, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Management, Nutrition education, Parent participation, Parenting education, Pregnancy outcome, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Prevention, Safety, Substance abuse treatment, Vocational education

Monahan C, Harders-Shanahan R, Maloney MM, Song J. 1997. Quality community managed care: A guide for quality assurance measures for children with special health care needs, includes pertinent measures from Medicaid HEDIS. Chicago, IL: University of Illinois at Chicago, Division of Specialized Care for Children, 48 pp.

Annotation: This manual presents methods for quality assurance measurements of health care service delivery for use with managed care plans to evaluate whether they are adequately serving children with special health care needs. The quality assurance measures include: membership (number of children with special health needs enrolled in the plan, ages, etc.); utilization (number of visits to doctor's office, emergency, mental health or drug-related, etc.); quality (preventive treatments, parents' satisfaction); access; health plan management, such as knowledge of these children's needs; clinical management, including relations with parents, case management; and finance, both total expenditures and cost per child. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to health care, Children with special health care needs, Evaluation, Managed care, Medicaid, Medicaid managed care, Outcome evaluation, Pediatrics, Quality assurance, Service coordination, Standards, Treatment outcome

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.