Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (113 total).

Rutgers Occupational Training and Education Consortium. n.d.. Trauma training: Child development, trauma and the brain—The DYFS mental health screening program. Buhl, ID: National Family Preservation Network,

Annotation: This website links to a training guide and participant workbook that provide activities that focus on trauma as a way of understanding how children and adolescents in the child welfare system are especially vulnerable to mental health challenges. The training materials were developed to help providers think about the physical effects of trauma on children, adolescents and young adults; understand the biological underpinnings of their challenges; and identify children with a suspected mental health need. Included are activities to help providers administer the New Jersey Mental Health Screening Tool (MHST) to assist with identifying children who may have mental health need and require further assessment.

Contact: National Family Preservation Network, 3971 North 1400 East, Buhl, Idaho 83316, Telephone: (888) 498-9047 E-mail: director@nfpn.org Web Site: http://nfpn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Children's mental health, Interventions, New Jersey, Screening, State programs, Training, Trauma

Branson BS, McCunniff MD. [2022]. Oral health guide for caregivers of school-aged children. Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Office of Dental Health, 16 pp.

Annotation: This booklet is designed to help school nurses and others who work with school-age children provide effective treatment for minor oral health emergencies or problems such as inflamed or irritated gum tissue, toothaches, a broken or displaced tooth, traumatic avulsion, and a lacerated lip or tongue. Topics include dental first aid and primary and permanent dentition. A dental trauma decision tree is included. zzz

Contact: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Office of Dental Health, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570, Telephone: (573) 751-5874 E-mail: info@health.mo.gov Web Site: http://health.mo.gov/living/families/oralhealth/index.php Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergencies, First aid, Oral health, School age children, School health, Trauma, Treatment

Crouch E, Shi S, Kelly K, McLain A, Eberth JM, Probst JC, Brown M, Merrell M, Bennett K. 2022. Rural-urban differences in adverse and positive childhood experiences: Results from the National Survey of Children's Health. Columbia, SC: Rural and Minority Health Research Center, 11 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief uses data from the 2016-2018 National Survey of Children's Health to assess the differences in adverse and positive childhood experiences among rural and urban children. The study provides the questions from the NSCH that deal with adverse experiences, which include: divorce or separation of parents/guardians; death of parent/guardian; incarceration of parent/guardian; violence among parents/guardians; violence aimed at child; witnessing violence in the neighborhood; mental illness among family/household members; substance abuse among family/household members; discrimination based on ethnicity; low income, resulting in food and/or housing insecurity. The NSCH also provides positive experiences that can help balance the adverse events. Study results show that rural and minority children and adolescents have higher rates of exposure to adverse experiences than their peers, but that rural children were also more likely to have multiple different positive experiences, such as community service or volunteer work, school, church, and having a mentor for guidance.

Contact: Rural and Minority Health Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: 803-251-6317 E-mail: jmeberth@mailbox.sc.edu Web Site: https://sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/public_health/research/research_centers/sc_rural_health_research_center/

Keywords: Child health, Family health, Maltreated children, Rural health, Rural populations, Stress, Trauma, Urban health, Urban populations

Kane M, Balaley M, Wheat J, Halle T. 2020. Addressing adversity and supporting families and staff for success in Early Head Start-child partnerships. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 7 pp.

Annotation: This resource first defines childhood adversity, and briefly describes how adversity experienced in childhood does (or does not) affect outcomes later in life. Next, it provides an overview of research on the effects that Early Head Start (EHS) and Head Start (HS) have on participating children and families who have experienced adversity. It then shifts to discussing adversity that EHS-CCP staff may have experienced and the effects of their experiences on their work with children, using a case study to illustrate approaches for supporting staff. The resource also highlights work that the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (one of the six grantees involved in Child Trends’ study) has done to support staff who have experienced adversity and facilitate their work with children and families.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Early Head Start, Trauma, Young children

Johnson J, Wright FD. 2019. Child maltreatment: The role of the dental professional. Dallas, TX: Procter and Gamble Company, 1 v.

Annotation: This continuing-education course for oral health professionals provides information about child abuse and neglect and outlines responsibilities for recognizing, reporting, treating, and preventing child abuse and neglect. Topics include defining the problem, the dentist's role in intervention, presenting problems that suggest child maltreatment, assessment and documentation, reporting, treatment for orofacial or dental trauma, and what oral health professionals can do to reduce child maltreatment.

Contact: Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH Telephone: (800) 543-2577 Web Site: http://www.dentalcare.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Continuing education, Dental care, Emotional abuse, Intervention, Maltreated children, Oral health, Physical abuse, Prevention services, Resources for professionals, Responsibility, Trauma

Hammett M with Altman L, Severin C, Stillerman A, Villanueva C. 2019. Trauma-informed care and oral health: Recommendations for practitioners. Illinois ACEs Response Collaborative and Health & Medicine Policy Research Group, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document, which is based on the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, provides background on childhood adversity and trauma; outlines the connection between ACE and oral health outcomes; and describes methods that dentists and other oral health professionals can embed in their practice, teaching, and research to promote health in all domains: physical, mental, and social-emotional. Trauma, toxic stress, and resilience are discussed, and a list of oral health conditions associated with a history of trauma and adversity is included.

Contact: Health & Medicine Policy Research Group, 29 E. Madison Suite 602, Chicago, IL 60602-4404, Web Site: http://www.hmprg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health promotion, Oral health, Research, Resilience, Stress, Trauma

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Violence Prevention. 2019. Preventing adverse childhood experiences (ACEs): Leveraging the best available evidence. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 35 pp.

Annotation: This document describes strategies and approaches that can prevent adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in the areas of economic support for families, promotion of social norms against violence and adversity, strong starts for children, skills teaching, connections with caring adults and activities, and interventions to lessen immediate and long-term harm. It also discusses sectors that can be involved in these efforts, including public health, and monitoring and evaluation.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Injury prevention, Trauma, Violence prevention, Young children

Sweetland J, Gibbons C, Vo C. 2017. Reframing school discipline: A strategic communications playbook. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 22 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines 12 evidence-based framing strategies that communicators in the education, justice, and civil rights sectors can use to challenge exclusionary discipline policies, build support for reducing racial disparities in disciplinary outcomes, and cultivate awareness of alternative approaches such as restorative justice and trauma-informed schools.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Communication, Discipline, Juvenile justice, Mental health, Schools, Stress, Students, Trauma

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2017. Availability, outcomes, and federal support related to pediatric trauma care. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report describes what is known about the availability of trauma centers for children and the outcomes for children treated at different types of facilities. The report also examines how, if at all, federal agencies are involved in supporting pediatric trauma care and how these activities are coordinated. Topics include the location of high-level pediatric trauma centers, the percentage of children who live within 30 miles of a high-level pediatric trauma center, and how well such centers work to lower mortality. Additional topics include federal interagency coordination to support hospital-based pediatric trauma care activities and training and resources available to physicians and nurses for pediatric trauma care. Examples are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-17-334.

Keywords: Access to health care, Emergency medical services for children, Federal agencies, Health care delivery, Injuries, Interagency cooperation, Outcome and process assessment, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Training, Trauma care, Trauma centers, Work force

Epstein R, Gonzalez T. 2017. Gender & trauma: Somatic interventions for girls in juvenile justice–Implications for policy and practice. Washington, DC: Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a foundational understanding of the relationship between trauma and gender -- with a focus on system-involved girls -- and provides an analysis of somatic interventions. In particular, the report maps the ways in which trauma-informed, gender-responsive, and culturally competent yoga and mindfulness programs can address the short- and long-term impact of trauma on girls in the juvenile justice system. Topics include the core components of somatic interventions for traumatized girls, data documenting positive effects, and specific policy and practice recommendations to increase access for system-involved girls.

Contact: Georgetown Law, Center on Poverty and Inequality, 600 New Jersey Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 661-6692 E-mail: povertycenter@law.georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/poverty-inequality/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent females, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Sexuality, Therapeutics, Trauma care

Bartlett JD, Smith S, Bringewatt E. 2017. Helping young children who have experienced trauma: Policies and strategies for early care and education. Washington, DC: Child Trends; New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report describes early childhood trauma and its effects, offers promising strategies for early care and education (ECE) programs and systems to help young children who have experienced trauma, and presents recommendations for state policymakers and other stakeholders looking to support trauma-informed ECE for this group.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chlld care, Community based services, Early childhood education, Family support services, Policy development, Service integration, Systems development, Trauma care, Vulnerability, Work force, Young children

Fond M, Kendall-Taylor N, Volmert A, Pineau MG, L’Hôte E. 2017. Seeing the spectrum: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Manitoba. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an empirically-based framing strategy for communicating about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Contents include a set of principles reflecting expert understanding of what fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is, how alcohol affects fetal development, why women consume alcohol while pregnant, what the effects of FASD are, and how FASD can be prevented and addressed. The report also describes shared but implicit understandings, assumptions, and patterns of reasoning that shape how the public thinks about FASD, points at which expert and public understandings overlap and diverge, and key challenges in communicating about FASD. Recommendations are included.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Beliefs, Communication, Culturally competent services, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prevention services, Research, Trauma care

Menschner C, Maul A. 2016. Key ingredients for successful trauma-informed care implementation. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 12 pp. (Advancing trauma-informed care)

Annotation: This brief provides a framework for implementing organizational and clinical policy changes across the health care sector to address trauma. It highlights program and payment reforms at the payer and health system levels, as well as at the state and federal level to support the adoption of trauma-informed care approaches. Examples of adult- and child-focused treatment models are included.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Models, Organizational change, Policy development, Reimbursement, Trauma care, Treatment

Pinderhughes H, Davis RA, Williams M. 2016. Adverse community experiences and resilience: A framework for addressing and preventing community trauma. Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 34 pp., exec. summ (6 pp.)

Annotation: This paper explores trauma at the population level and how it impacts efforts to prevent violence and improve other aspects of community health. The paper also presents a framework for addressing and preventing trauma at the community level. Topics include the community environment, the production of trauma from violence, community strategies to address community violence, elements of a resilient community, and promoting community resilience.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Culturally competent services, Economic factors, Emotional trauma, Geographic factors, Health promotion, Models, Prevention programs, Resilience, Social conditions, Social support, Sociocultural factors, Standards, Trauma, Trauma care, Violence prevention

Lechner A, Cavanaugh M, Blyler C. 2016. Addressing trauma in American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes an environmental scan of practices and programs for addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. Contents include a summary of the scan scope and results, trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions, interventions focused on suicide prevention and substance use disorders, parenting interventions for youth and their guardians, aspirational frameworks, and common elements of programs addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs of AI/AN youth. The systematic database search methodology and summaries of interventions and evaluations are also provided.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indian, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parenting, Program evaluation, Protective factors, Substance use disorders, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Trauma care, Youth

National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention. 2016. Guidance for CDR and FIMR teams on addressing vicarious trauma. Washington, DC: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, 15 pp.

Annotation: This guidance is designed to help partners engaged in the fetal infant mortality review (FIMR) or child death review (CDR) process address the vicarious trauma (VT) that can result from exposure to child deaths. Contents include the definition, signs, and symptoms of VT; VT and fatality review; the risk factors for VT; and steps to mitigate the impact of VT. Topics include positive ways to respond to VT including what the FIMR/CDR team, can do, what the FIMR/CDR coordinator can do, and how the agency can support the FIMR or CDR program; what individuals can do for themselves; negative ways to respond to VT including what a state FIMR/CDR coordinator can do if a team resists discussion or activities concerning VT or thinks it doesn't need them. Descriptions of articles, self-inventory checklists, presentations, and other resources are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, c/o Michigan Public Health Institute, 1115 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (800) 656-2434 Secondary Telephone: (517) 614-0379 Fax: (517) 324-6009 E-mail: info@childdeathreview.org Web Site: https://www.ncfrp.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death review, Infant mortality, Leadership, Resources for professionals, Risk factors, Role, Teamwork, Trauma, Trauma care

AcademyHealth. 2016. What tools are effective in screening for adverse childhood experiences among children?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 9 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews of measures that can be used to screen children enrolled in Medicaid for adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), defined as stressful or traumatic events including abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. The appendices contain definitions of terms; search terms and databases used in the review; a table of selected measures including the measure name, type, ACEs, strengths, limitations, and other considerations; and systematic reviews included in the evidence review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Evaluation methods, Evidence based medicine, Low income groups, Measures, Medicaid, Public policy, Research reviews, Screening, Stress, Trauma

AcademyHealth. 2016. What evidence-based interventions for parents and families help mitigate adverse childhood experiences among children?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 6 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews on the effectiveness of interventions that help to mitigate parental and familial factors that may contribute to adverse childhood experiences among children. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. Topics include parent education programs (conducted outside the home), home visit programs, dual treatment programs for substance abuse, and trauma-informed care. The appendices contain definitions of terms; search terms and databases used in the review; and a table that describes the systematic reviews included in the review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Evaluation methods, Evidence based medicine, Home visiting, Intervention, Low income groups, Medicaid, Parent education, Public policy, Research reviews, Stress, Substance abuse treatment, Trauma, Trauma care

AcademyHealth. 2016. Which adverse childhood experiences are most predictive of health care costs among adults?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 6 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) associated with higher health care costs among adults. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. Collectively, the studies included in the review report costs for three of 10 major ACEs: physical abuse, sexual abuse, and physical neglect. The appendices contain definitions of terms, search terms and databases used in the review, and a description of systematic reviews and relevant primary research studies included in the review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Costs, Evaluation methods, Life course, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, Research reviews, Stress, Trauma, Women

Murphey D. 2016. Moving beyond trauma: Child migrants and refugees in the United States. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report examines demographic data and other research findings to focus on common challenges among immigrant children. Contents key findings and background; definitions; information about refugees and those seeking asylum, undocumented children apprehended by Border Control, and children of unauthorized immigrants; threats to migrant children's well-being, including family instability, health, education, and economic security; public assistance available to international child migrants; and recommendations and resources.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Immigration, Migrants, Public assistance, Refugees, Risk factors, Trauma

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.