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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

Partnership for the Public's Health. n.d.. Tips and tools: Working effectively across languages. Oakland, CA: Partnership for the Public's Health, 15 pp.

Annotation: This publication, which is written in both English and Spanish on facing pages, is designed to help groups reach across differences that might otherwise obscure talents, perspectives, and contributions of people who have much to offer in making our communities safer and healthier. The publication includes an overview of the Cultural Competency Sub-Committee of the Partnership for the Public's Health (PPH), the subcommittee's guiding principles, PPH's language policy, information on providing translation and interpretation services, guidelines for working with interpretation and translation agencies, guidelines for facilitators working in multi-lingual settings using simultaneous interpretation, and guidelines for selecting interpretation equipment.

Contact: Partnership for the Public's Health, 180 Grand Avenue, Suite 750 , Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 451-8600 Fax: (510) 451-8606 E-mail: ccastro-rojas@PartnershipPH.org Web Site: http://www.partnershipph.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Guidelines, Language, Spanish language materials, Translation

Community Preventive Services Task Force. 2016. Promoting health equity. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide evidence-based recommendations and findings about what works to promote health equity in the community. Topics include education programs and policies, culturally competent health care, and housing programs and policies. Presentation and promotional materials are included.

Contact: Community Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MSE69, Atlanta, GA 30329, Telephone: (404) 498-6595 E-mail: communityguide@cdc.gov Web Site: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-members Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Early childhood education, Low income groups, After school programs, Child development centers, Community based programs, Community development, Community health centers, Consumer education materials, Culturally competent services, Education, Educational attainment, Equal opportunities, Financial support, Health care delivery, Health education, Health promotion, Housing, Kindergarten, Patient education materials, Public policy, Recruitment, Research, Retention, School based clinics, Training, Translation, Work force

ViaLanguage. 2012. Beyond translation: Best practices for healthcare [3rd. ed.]. Portland, OR: ViaLanguage, 44 pp.

Annotation: This booklet about the translation of health information is geared toward helping health professionals reach their Limited English Proficiency (LEP) audiences with messages and information in the most effective way. It addresses these practices: (1) defining objectives and scope of the translation program; (2) balancing language needs and cultural differences; (3) use of the Internet, social media, and mobile applications; (4) delivering successful translation/transcreation and localization projects; (5) finding a good translation service; and (6) budgeting. The booklet also provides a list of major legislation that mandates access services for those with limited English proficiency; tips on maintaining a project timeline; and a description of translation tools such as translation memory software, translation glossaries, and style guides.

Contact: ViaLanguage, 700 SouthWest Taylor Street, Suite 300, Portland, OR 97205, Telephone: (800) 737-8481 Web Site: http://www.viadelivers.com/via_solutions_learning.php Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Culturally competent services, Health services, Language barriers, Non English language materials, Translations

DeFrancis B, Richards J. 2012. Translation toolkit. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist maternal and child health professionals in addressing language barriers. Contents include best practices and standards, resources about plain language and health literacy, glossaries and medical dictionaries, non English language materials, and information about translation services and resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Language barriers, Model programs, Non English language materials, Resource materials, Resources for professionals, Translations

McGee J. 2010. Toolkit for making written material clear and effective. [Baltimore, MD]: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services,

Annotation: This toolkit provides guidance about creating material that is easy for people to read, understand, and use. Contents focus on creating material intended for use by individuals eligible for or enrolled in Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program and by those who serve or assist them. Topics include a reader-centered approach, writing and graphic design, testing material with readers, readability formulas, and translation.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Graphic design, Guidelines, Health literacy, Low literacy materials, Oral health, Resources for professionals, Translations, Writing

Hablamos Juntos and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. [2009]. More than words toolkit: Improving the quality of health care translations. [Fresno, CA]: Hablamos Juntos,

Annotation: This Web site hosts a toolkit designed to help health care organizations enhance their communications with limited English proficiency patients. The toolkit provides assistance for designing translation briefs, creating translations, and assessing the quality of translations. The toolkit specifically provides information for creating informed consent forms. Other resources hosted here include links to translator services, examples of translations, glossaries and dictionaries, and professional associations.

Contact: Hablamos Juntos, UCSF Fresno Center for Medical Education and Ressearch, 155 North Fresno Street, Fresno, CA 93701, Telephone: (559) 241-6509 Fax: (559) 241-6532 E-mail: info@hablamosjuntos.org Web Site: http://www.hablamosjuntos.org/default.about.asp Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Culturally competent services, Limited English speakers, Migrant health, Translations

Youdelman M, Perkins J. 2005. Providing language services in small health care provider settings: Examples from the field. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund; Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 78 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study conducted to assess current innovations in providing language services in small health care provider settings and identifies promising practices that are replicable by other small providers (e.g., recruiting bilingual staff for dual roles; conducting ongoing cultural and language competency training for interpreter staff; using community resources such as hospitals, managed care organizations, students, and volunteers; and capitalizing on underutilized resources). An eight-step plan to help providers develop a strategy to meet the needs of limited English proficiency clients and the community is included. Three appendices include a summary of surveyed models for providing language assistance services in small health care provider settings, a suggested plan of implementing language services, and the project methodology.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Culturally competent services, Health professionals, Limited English speakers, Model programs, Training, Translations

National Council on Interpreting in Health Care. 2005. National standards of practice for interpreters in health care. Santa Rosa, CA: National Council on Interpreting in Health Care, 13 pp.

Annotation: These standards of practice are intended to be used as a reference by interpreters anad those who work with, train, and employ interpreters. The standards are intended to guide the practice of all interpreters and to acquaint non-interpreters with the standards recognized withing the interpreting profession. The standards are divided into the following categories: (1) accuracy, (2) confidentiality, (3) impartiality, (4) respect, (5) cultural awareness, (6) role boundaries, (7) professionalism, (8) professional development, and (9) advocacy. A glossary is included.

Contact: National Council on Interpreting in Health Care, 5614 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., #119, Washington, DC 20015-2601, Telephone: (202) 505-1537 Fax: (267) 217-9674 E-mail: info@ncihc.org Web Site: http://www.ncihc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Guidelines, Language barriers, Standards, Training, Translations

Osorio L, ed. 2005. English-Spanish dictionary of health related terms. (3rd ed.). Berkeley, CA: University of California, California Policy Research Center, 71 pp.

Annotation: This English-Spanish dictionary of health-related terms was developed as an instrument for health professionals and other professionals working with the Latino population in the United States. The main purpose of the dictionary is to strengthen communication between Spanish-speaking populations and the health professionals that serve them and to facilitate dialogue by reducing cultural and linguistic barriers. This third edition builds on the first two editions, and approximatly 4,000 new terms have been added since the second edition. The majority of the new terms are related to emergency and disaster preparedness. In addition to the A-Z list of words, the dictionary includes bilingual lists of general instructions that may be useful in health care settings, instructions on taking medicines, and terms related to personal data, medical history, and human anatomy. Terms are listed alphabetically by the English words.

Contact: California Policy Research Center, 1950 Addison Street #203, Berkeley, CA 94720-7410, Telephone: (510) 642-5514 Fax: (510) 642-8793 E-mail: cprc@ucop.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Cultural barriers, Dictionaries, Health, Hispanic Americans, Language barriers, Spanish language materials, Translations

Cox J, Holden J, Henshaw C. 2003. Perinatal mental health: A guide to the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). (2nd ed.). London, UK: Gaskell, 213 pp.

Annotation: This book is intended to provide readers in different countries with updated and accessible information on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), a 10-item self-report scale devised as a screening questionnaire to improve the detection of postnatal depression in the community. The EPDS has been translated into a number of languages, and 20 of the translated versions appear in the book. The book also offers readers information on the use of the EPDS in primary and secondary care. It provides an overview of postnatal depression, discusses the origins and development of the EPDS, addresses international and cultural issues, addresses use of the EPDS in research, discusses counseling and other interventions, talks about EPDS screening and intervention services, and explains how to use the EPDS. Two appendices include the original EPDS and 20 translations, in Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Czech, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindi, Icelandic, Japanese, Maltese, Norwegian, Portuguese, Punjabi, Slovenian, Spanish, Swedish, Urdu, and Vietnamese.

Contact: Gaskell, Royal College of Psychiatrists, 17 Belgrave Square, London, England SW1X 8PG, Telephone: 020 7235 2351 Fax: 020 7245 1231 E-mail: rcpsych@rcpsych.ac.uk Web Site: http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-901242-81-1.

Keywords: Asian language materials, Counseling, Cultural factors, I, International health, Intervention, Maternal health, Mental health, Non English language materials, Postpartum depression, Primary care, Questionnaires, Research, Screening, Secondary care, Spanish language materials, Translations, Women's health

Youdelman M, Perkins J. 2002. Providing language interpretation services in health care settings: Examples from the field. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 54 pp. (Field report)

Annotation: This report attempts to identify and describe promising language interpretation services programs and practices that can be adapted or replicated elsewhere, as well as avenues for funding them. The report also provides examples from the following fields: statewide Medicaid/SCHIP reimbursement; state and local government initiatives; managed care organizations; hospitals; community-based organizations; and educational models. The appendix includes descriptions of models for language services to individuals with limited English proficiency in federal and state-by-state programs.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Federal programs, Financing, Health care delivery, Language barriers, Models, Program descriptions, State programs, Translations

Paez K. 2002. Providing oral linguistic services: A guide for managed care plans. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; [Baltimore, MD]: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 108 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this guide is to assist plans in addressing shifting demographic trends by offering an approach to defining the oral linguistic needs of limited English proficiency members and then developing strategies to meet their communication needs. In particular, guidance is offered to Medicare+Choice organizations that choose to improve oral linguistic services for their 2003 national quality assessment and performance improvement project. The following steps are included: (1) identify oral linguistic needs of membership; (2) assess capabilities of the managed care plan; (3) identify points of contact for members of managed care plans; (4) consider different oral linguistic services; (5) assemble an oral linguistics services plan; and (6) identify points of contact for members of managed care plans. The guide concludes with references and resources.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Health services delivery, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Managed care, Manuals, Needs assessment, Program assessment, Program development, Translations

Paez K. 2002. Planning culturally and linguistically appropriate services: A guide for managed care plans. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; [Baltimore, MD]: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 119 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this guide is to assist plans in addressing shifting demographic trends by offering an approach to defining the cultural and linguistic needs of multi-ethnic members and then to develop culturally and linguistically appropriate services to meet these needs. In particular, guidance is provided to Medicare+Choice organizations that choose to assess the cultural and linguistic needs of their membership for their 2003 national quality assessment and performance improvement project. The first section explores the CLAS (culturally and linguistically appropriate services) assessment and planning. Topics include preparing the CLAS assessment and planning team; assessing the diversity of plan members and the community; assessing the managed care plan; and identifying gaps, determining priorities, and briefing senior leaders. Part two outlines three broad areas of focus for improving CLAS: (1) providing linguistics services, (2) improving cultural competence on multiple levels, and (3) developing a diverse workforce. The guide concludes with references and resources.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Culturally competent services, Health services delivery, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Linguistic competence, Managed care, Manuals, Needs assessment, Program assessment, Program development, Translations

Li RM, McCardle P, Clark RL, Kinsella K, Berch D, eds. 2001. Diverse voices: The inclusion of language-minority populations in national studies—Challenges and opportunities. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Aging, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a workshop held at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, on July 27-28, 2000, on the barriers to and the inclusion of language-minority populations in national studies. Participants included demographers, statisticians, sociologists, psychologists, linguists, anthropologists, experts in emerging computerized translation technologies, representatives of major private survey organizations and translation agencies, opinion leaders, and representatives of federal agencies. Report sections include a description of language-minority populations; a review of challenges for including language-minority populations; sampling, measuring, and interviewing these populations; and technological innovation and linguistic logistics. The report also includes an executive summary, summary of barriers to inclusion and enabling inclusion, and references. The appendices include recent and current-practice examples, the workshop agenda, biographical sketches of presenters, and a list of workshop participants.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Information Resource Center, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (866) 760-5947 E-mail: NICHDInformationResourceCenter@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nichd.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural diversity, Cultural sensitivity, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, National Institutes of Health, National programs, Research design, Research methodology, Surveys, Translations

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.