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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (56 total).

Bronheim S, Fiel S, Schidlow D, MagrabP, Boczar K, Dillon C. n.d.. Crossings: A manual for transition of chronically ill youth to adult health care. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended as a guide for health professionals to establish a new health care delivery system for transitioning adolescents with chronic illness to adult health care. Health professionals learn about eight objectives: exploring one's commitment to transition, identification of initial partners; securing institutional support; assuring economic feasibility, developing a structure, developing a successful partnership, and achieving a successful transfer of patients. A self-assessment form is included.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health services, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Transitions, Young adults

Family Voices; IMPACT. n.d.. Transitions--Growing up and away. Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, IMPACT, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides tips to help parents of adolescents with special health care needs support their sons' and daughters' transition into adulthood.

Contact: Family Voices, P.O. Box 37188, Albuquerque, NM 87176, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.familyvoices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents with special health care needs, Parenting, Transition planning, Transitions, Young adults

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Helping children in foster care make successful transitions into child care. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics , 2 pp.

White P, Schmidt A, McManus M, Irwin CI Jr. 2018. Incorporating health care transition services into preventive care for adolescents and young adults: A toolkit for clinicians. Washington, DC: Got Transition; San Francisco, CA: Adolescent and Young Adult Health National Resource Center, 18 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit for clinicians provides suggested questions and anticipatory guidance specific to adolescents' transition to adult health care, and is meant to be used alongside Bright Futures. It covers early adolescence (11-14 years) through early adulthood (22-25 years), and includes transition and preventive health care guidance. It is aimed at the entire health care team. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Got Transition™/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, 1615 M Street, N.W., Suite 290, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3957 E-mail: info@GotTransition.org Web Site: http://gottransition.org

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Coordination, Pediatric care, Self care, Spanish language materials, Transition planning, Transitions, Young adults

Mann R, Mays A. 2017. State ESSA plans to support student health and wellness: A framework for action (3rd ed.). Chicago, IL: Healthy Schools Campaign, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on developing state plans for implementing the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in ways that support student health and wellness. Topics include engaging stakeholders in a way that ensures an effective ESSA state plan is developed and implemented; implementing a state accountability system and creating a school report card that supports the health and learning connection; integrating health and wellness into standards, assessments, and a well-rounded education; integrating student learning through staff wellness and professional development; supporting the transition from early childhood programs to elementary school; transferring funding to strengthen ESSA health and wellness programming; the Student Support and Academic Enrichment grant; and looking ahead. For each topic, the document outlines why it's important, what the law says, action steps, and resources. An overview of ESSA is included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Campaign, 175 N. Franklin, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (312) 419-1810 Fax: (312) 419-1806 Web Site: http://www.healthyschoolscampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Accountability, Adolescent health, Case studies, Child health, Federal initiatives, Financing, Grants, Learning, Needs Assessment, Organizational change, Policy development, School age children, School health programs, Schools, Service integration, Standards, Statewide planning, Students, Transitions

McManus M, Beck D. 2017. Transition to adult health care and state Title V program directions: A review of 2017 block grant applications. Washington, DC: Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, 11 pp. (Report; no. 3)

Annotation: This report presents information about state Title V transition strategies and evidence-informed measures. Contents include an executive summary and recommendations, examples of innovative transition strategies, and information about a new transition measure from the National Survey of Children's Health that will be used to report state and national transition performance. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Got Transition™/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, 1615 M Street, N.W., Suite 290, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3957 E-mail: info@GotTransition.org Web Site: http://gottransition.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Measures, Program development, Program planning, State programs, Transition planning, Transitions

Harwood C, McManus M, White P. 2017. Incorporating pedatric-to-adult transition into NCQA patient-centered medical home recognition. Washington, DC: Got Transition™/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, 11 pp. (Practice resource, no. 4)

Annotation: This resource is intended to facilitate the application of nationally-recognized transition tools to address specific criteria developed by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in their 2017 Patient-Centered Medical Home standards. Contents include NCQA criteria and guidance cross-walked with relevant sample tools. Topics include team-based care and practice organization, knowing and managing patients, patient-centered access and continuity, care management and support, care coordination and care transitions, and performance measurement and quality improvement. Descriptions of the tools are also provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Got Transition™/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, 1615 M Street, N.W., Suite 290, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3957 E-mail: info@GotTransition.org Web Site: http://gottransition.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Measures, Medical home, Patient care management, Patient care teams, Program coordination, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Special health care needs, Standards, Transitions, Youth

Health Services for Children with Special Needs, The National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, and District of Columbia Department of Health. 2016. Health care transition for adolescents and young adults: An online video CME series. Washington, DC: Health Services for Children with Special Needs, 1 v.

Annotation: This online course offers a brief review of clinical recommendations on transition and a tested quality improvement model. It also features physicians in pediatric, family medicine, and internal medicine practices in the District of Columbia who successfully implemented core elements of health care transition using quality improvement methodologies.

Contact: Health Services for Children with Special Needs, 1101 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-2737 Secondary Telephone: (866) 937-4549 Fax: (202) 466-8514 Web Site: http://www.hscsn-net.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Distance education, Multimedia, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transitions, Youth in transition programs

Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative. 2016. Preparing for the road ahead: Helping young people transition from foster care to adulthood. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the successes and vision of a national initiative to help young people transition from foster care and thrive. Contents include information about the initiative's impact, timeline, core strategies, outcome areas, and next steps. The report describes how the initiative is helping young people in foster care achieve critical milestones in permanence, education, employment, financial capability, housing, physical and mental health, and social capital; how the initiative integrates young people's voices into its work; and how it collaborates with national and local partners, policymakers, and young people to create conditions that improve outcomes for youth transitioning to adulthood.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Collaboration, Foster care, National initiatives, Outcome and process assessment, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Public private partnerships, School to work transition, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development, Youth in transition programs

U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. 2015. Healthy transitions: A pathway to employment for youth with chronic health conditions and other disabilities. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, 12 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief presents research findings about the relationship between disability (including chronic conditions), health and wellness, and transition and employment outcomes for youth with disabilities. The brief also examines the role health care professionals play in establishing employment expectations. Contents include information about the study methods, transition planning, and recommendations.

Contact: U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, Frances Perkins Building, 200 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20210, Telephone: (202) 693-7880 Secondary Telephone: (866) 633-7365 Fax: (202) 693-7888 E-mail: infoDEP@dol.gov Web Site: http://www.dol.gov/odep Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Employment, Outcome and process assessment, Role, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Young adults

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, de Beaumont Foundation. 2015. PH WINS: Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey . Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources draw from the first nationally representative survey of individual state health agency workers about work force development priorities, the workplace environment, and key national initiatives. Topics include systems thinking; communicating persuasively; and change management, flexibility, and adaptability. Contents include key survey findings, access to the data and a journal supplement, an infographic, and additional resources.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Attitudes, Communication skills, Decision making skills, Environmental influences, Measures, National surveys, Organizational change, Problem solving, Professional development, State health agencies, Transitions, Work force, Workplace

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2015. Medical home modules for pediatric residency education. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 51 pp.

Annotation: This series of five case-based, educational modules on key medical home principles is designed to be incorporated into existing curriculum by residency program directors and faculty. Collectively, the modules educate residents about characteristics and benefits of the patient‐ and family‐centered medical home, care coordination, care planning, transition to adult care and team-based care.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Coordination, Family centered care, Medical home, Patient care teams, Pediatric care, Planning, Professional education, Transitions

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2015. Adaptive leadership and public health. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1 video (5 min., 25 sec.).

Annotation: This video examines adaptive leadership as a practical framework for leading consequential change in the midst of significant market and sociopolitical transformation. Topics include how local health officials and their staff are exploring innovative partnerships with other agencies in health care and beyond and identifying new ways of operating within and influencing the economic and social conditions of the health system.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Community action, Health care reform, Health systems agencies, Leadership, Local health agencies, Organizational change, Policy development, Political systems, Public private partnerships, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors, Systems development, Transitions

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: How do young adults fare and what characteristics are associated with a lower-risk transition?. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 12 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief identifies patterns and transitions during emerging adulthood and the likelihood that young adults will experience a lower-risk transition to adulthood. Topics include differences between groups by gender, race and ethnicity, and nativity status; transition patterns over time; and implications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Data, Longitudinal studies, Risk factors, Transitions, Trends, Young adults, Youth, Youth development

Bensen R, Steidtmann D, Vaks Y. 2014. A Triple Aim approach to transition from pediatric to adult health care for youth with special health care needs. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Terzian MA, Moore KA, Constance N. 2014. Transitioning to adulthood: The role of supportive relationships and regular religious involvement. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents findings from a study to assess the long-term implications of supportive relationships and religious involvement, by assessing whether young adults who reported having positive relationships with their parents, teachers, or friends or who reported weekly religious involvement when they were adolescents were more likely to later have lower-risk transitions to adulthood relative to young adults who had not reported these positive social connections as adolescents, even taking sociodemographic background and negative childhood experiences into account. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Longitudinal studies, Relationships, Religion, Research, Risk factors, Social factors, Transitions, Young adults, Youth development

Kagan C, Lewandowski K. 2014. The ACA and former foster youth: Opportunities and challenges for states. Boston, MA: Community Catalyst, 9 pp.

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. 2014. America's young adults: Special issue, 2014. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 84 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the demographic characteristics and well-being of young adults (ages 18-24) against a backdrop of the traditional milestones of adulthood including education; economic circumstances; family formation; civic, social, and personal behavior; and health and safety. Topics include characteristics of young adults, the current opportunities and challenges they face, and the implications of possible trajectories for their futures and their families.

Contact: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, E-mail: childstats@ed.gov Web Site: http://childstats.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Family characteristics, Life course, Social indicators, Statistics, Transitions, Trends, Young adults

Nash R. 2014. Preparing adolescents for self-care: A transition toolkit for Iowa's community health centers. Urbandale, IA: Iowa Primary Care Association, 47 pp.

Hanlon C, Heider F. 2014. Bridging health care and early education system transformations to achieve kindergarten readiness in Oregon. Boston, MA: Build Initiative, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report describes how Oregon has leveraged opportunities to support a state-led, fundamental shift in how the health care and early education systems function and align with each other. Topics include why, what, and how Oregon is aligning these two systems, next steps and remaining challenges, and lessons learned. Key transformation milestones, organizational charts, and timelines of key alignment activities are also included.

Contact: Build Initiative, 89 South Street, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02111, Telephone: (617) 523-6565 E-mail: info@buildinitiative.org Web Site: http://www.buildinitiative.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational change, Educational reform, Health care reform, Health care systems, Integrated information systems, Kindergarten, Oregon, Organizational change, Service delivery systems, Social change, State initiatives, Systems development, Transitions, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.