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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 11 (11 total).

Bronheim S, Fiel S, Schidlow D, MagrabP, Boczar K, Dillon C. n.d.. Crossings: A manual for transition of chronically ill youth to adult health care. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended as a guide for health professionals to establish a new health care delivery system for transitioning adolescents with chronic illness to adult health care. Health professionals learn about eight objectives: exploring one's commitment to transition, identification of initial partners; securing institutional support; assuring economic feasibility, developing a structure, developing a successful partnership, and achieving a successful transfer of patients. A self-assessment form is included.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health services, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Transitions, Young adults

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2019. AMCHP's implementation toolkit for National Performance Measure 12: Percent of adolescents with and without special health care needs who received services necessary to make transitions to adult care. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1 set of linked pages.

Annotation: This toolkit contains examples of strategies state Title V programs can use to address National Performance Measure 12: Percent of adolescents with and without special health care needs who received services necessary to make transitions to adult care. Strategies are listed in these categories: (1) youth and family education and leadership development; (2) health care professional workforce development; (3) care coordination; (4) communications and social media; and (5) measurement and assessment. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Model programs, Resources for professionals, Special health care needs, State programs, Title V programs, Transition to adult services, Young adults

Youth Transitions Collaborative, Got Transition/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. 2015. Transition quickguide: Take charge of planning and managing your own health and career goals. Washington, DC: Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, 6 pp.

Annotation: This checklist for youth and young adults, including those with disabilities and chronic health conditions, from ages 12-30, provides information and resources about health insurance coverage, self-care, health care transition, decision-making, and career planning and management. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Got Transition™/Center for Health Care Transition Improvement, National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, 1615 M Street, N.W., Suite 290, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-1500 Fax: (202) 429-3957 E-mail: info@GotTransition.org Web Site: http://gottransition.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Decision making, Guidelines, Health insurance, Life skills, School to work transition, Special health care services, Transition planning, Young adults

Bonnie RJ, Stroud C, Breiner H, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Improving the Health, Safety, and Well-Being of Young Adults; National Research Council. 2014. Investing in the health and well-being of young adults. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 433 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes what is known about the health, safety, and well-being of young adults and offers recommendations for policy and research. Contents include a cross-cutting recommendation that applies to all policies and programs addressing young adults, whether public or private, in all sectors of society. Subsequent recommendations focus on the key domains of relationships, education and employment, civic engagement and national service, public health, the health care systems, and government investments in marginalized young adults.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evidence based medicine, Health status, Preventive health services, School to work transition, Service integration, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults, Youth in transition programs

Langford BH, Greenblatt SB. [2012]. Investment matters: Investing in supports for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults in or transitioning from foster care. Chicago, IL: Youth Transition Funders Group, Foster Care Work Group, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights considerations, challenges, and opportunities for foundations in investing in supports for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults—both mothers and fathers—currently in or transitioning from foster care. Topics include early sexual behavior, pregnancy, and rates of childbearing and parenthood among young people in foster care, risk factors, and challenging outcomes. Additional challenges such as lack of national data on specific needs and challenges, lack of practice models, need for workforce training, how to best identify and support adolescent fathers, and limited application of developmentally appropriate service delivery and planning with those that remain in foster care through age 21 are discussed. Investment opportunities in research and data collection, pregnancy prevention strategies, state supports for young parents and their children, and extending eligibility and re-entry are outlined.

Contact: Youth Transitions Funders Group, 207 East Ohio Street, #392, Chicago, IL 60611, E-mail: info@ytfg.org Web Site: http://www.ytfg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Family support programs, Foster care, Parent support services, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Arc of Illinois, Family to Family Health and Education Center. 2008. Family manual: Transition to employment and adult services for youth with developmental disabilities in Illinois. (Rev ed.). Homewood, IL: Family to Family Health and Educatin Center, The ARC of Illinois, 58 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this manual is to assist families of young adults with developmental disabilities with the transition from the school system and services for children to the world of work and adult services. Topics include special education and transition planning; children's waiver for developmental disabilities; straight talk on the PUNS (Illinois waiting list); the world of adult services and supports; adult waiver for developmental disabilities; health insurance and employment; services, supports, options, and trends; and who can help with advocacy for children and adults with developmental disabilities.

Contact: Arc of Illinois, Family to Family Health Information Center, 20901 LaGrange Road, Suite 209, Frantfort, IL 60423, Telephone: (815) 464-8247 Secondary Telephone: (866) 931-1110 Fax: (815) 464-5292 E-mail: info@thearcofil.org Web Site: http://familyvoicesillinois.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Adolescents with special health care needs, Employment, Families, Health insurance, Illinois, School to work transition, Services, Transition planning, Trends, Young adults, Young adults

Williams B, Tolbert J. 2007. Aging out of EPSDT: Issues for young adults with disabilities. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 12 pp. (Issue paper)

Annotation: This issue paper discusses the challenges and implications for young adults with disabilities when they lose their eligibility for Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment program benefits. The brief discusses difficulties in qualifying for Medicaid and the reduced benefits for those who do qualify. The brief also discusses how changes to the Deficit Reduction Act give states an opportunity to increase the availability of Medicaid services that allow young adults with disabilities to lead lives that are as normal as possible as they move into adulthood. Individual case stories are highlighted.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Adolescents with special health care needs, EPSDT, Federal programs, Health care financing, Health insurance, Health services, Medicaid, Oral Health, Transition, Young adults

Gibson RW, Reiss JG. 2005. Envisioning my future: A young person's guide to health care transition. Gainesville, FL: University of Florida, Institute for Child Health Policy, 23 pp.

Annotation: This booklet, which is intended for adolescents and young adults with special health care needs, is designed to help readers start thinking about health care transitions and making a health care transition plan. The booklet provides general information about health care transition, discusses new responsiblities (for adolescents ages 12-14), practicing independence (for adolescents ages 15-17) and taking charge of health care (for adolescents and young adults ages 18 and older). A list of transition resources is also included.

Contact: Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida, 1329 SW 16th Street, Room 5130 , Gainesville, FL 32608, Telephone: (352) 265-7220 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (352) 265-7221 Web Site: http://www.ichp.ufl.edu/ichp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Consumer education materials, Families, Health services, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Reiss J, Gibson R. 2005. Health care transition workbook: For CMS enrollees age 18 and older. Tallahassee, FL: Institute for Child Health Policy at the University of Florida, 30 pp.

Annotation: This workbook, which is designed for young adults (ages 18 and older) with special health care needs and their parents, is intended to help readers think about future goals and to identify things that they are doing now to become independent in managing their own health care. The workbook also helps readers determine what needs to be done to ensure that the transition from pediatric to adult-oriented health care is smooth. The workbook includes worksheets for parents and worksheets for young adults.

Contact: Institute for Child Health Policy, University of Florida, 1329 SW 16th Street, Room 5130 , Gainesville, FL 32608, Telephone: (352) 265-7220 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (352) 265-7221 Web Site: http://www.ichp.ufl.edu/ichp Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Goals, Health services, Independence, Parents, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Workbooks, Young adults

Davis M, Koyanagi C. 2005. Summary of Center for Mental Health Services Youth Transition Policy Meeting: National experts panel—Final report. Worcester, MA: Center for Mental Health Services Research, University of Massachusetts Medical School; Washington, DC: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 30 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This report summarizes a meeting held June 8-9, 2005 in Rockville, Maryland, focusing on federal policy issues affecting young people with serious mental health conditions as they transition into adulthood. Topics include typical biopsychosocial development, development in individuals with serious mental health conditions, adulthood for youth with serious mental health conditions, challenges produced by current federal programs and policies, brief summaries of federal programs, and recommendations for change in federal policy. Appendices include a list of meeting participants; a paper reviewing the research literature on the characteristics youth and young adults with serious mental health conditions as they mature from adolescence to adulthood, and the service systems with which they are involved; a paper summarizing 55 federal programs that fund services relevant to individuals with mental health conditions between the ages of 14-25, a copy of the meeting agenda, and a table of voting by meeting participants on the three highest priorities.

Contact: University of Massachusetts Medical School, Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, MA 01655, Telephone: (508) 856-5498 E-mail: SPARC@umassmed.edu Web Site: http://www.umassmed.edu/sparc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Conferences, Federal programs, Final reports, Mental disorders, Mental health services, Transition to independent living, Young adults

ASD Expert Working Group. 2005. Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) roadmap. Silver Spring, MD: Social and Scientific Systems, 17 pp.

Annotation: This action plan provides a national blueprint to enhance existing systems; expand services for children, adolescents, and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and their families; and coordinate services across systems. The document discusses (1) achieving family and professional partnerships, (2) early and continuous developmental and medical screening for autism, (3) access to all needed ASD health, mental health, education, and social services, (4) organization of community-based services for easy use, (5) youth transition to adult services, work, and independence, and (6) appropriate financing of care. For each of these topic areas, a goal, challenges, and recommendations are presented.

Contact: Waisman Center for Mental Retardation and Human Development, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1500 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705-2280, Telephone: (608) 263-5776 Secondary Telephone: (608) 263-1656 Fax: (608) 263-0529 Web Site: http://www.waisman.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Adolescent, Adults, Autism, Community based services, Education, Families, Financing, Health care systems, Health services, Mental health, Program coordination, School to work transition, Service coordination, Social services, Transition planning, Youth in transition program

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.