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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 13 (13 total).

American Council for Drug Education. n.d.. Drugs may harm your unborn baby: Only take drugs your doctor prescribes. Washington, DC: American Council for Drug Education, 1 poster (17 x 22 inches).

Savitz DA, Singer PC, Hartmann KE, Herring AJ, Weinberg HS. 2005. Drinking water disinfection by-products and pregnancy outcome. Denver, CO: Awwa Research Foundation, 212 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study to address the question of whether exposure to elevated levels of drinking water disinfection by-products is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome such as pregnancy loss, preterm birth, and reduced fetal growth. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following chapters: (1) background to study, (2) study methodology, (3) methods for assignment of exposure, (4) pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes assessment, (5) statistical methods, (6) results, (7) interpretation, (8) analyses of live birth outcomes, and (9) blood biomarker study. An appendix, references, and a list of abbreviations are included.

Contact: Awwa Research Foundation, 6666 West Quincy Avenue, Denver, CO 80235-3098, Telephone: (303) 347-6100 Fax: (303) 730-0851 E-mail: info@awwarf.org Web Site: http://www.awwarf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disinfection, Environmental influences, Pregnancy, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy loss, Pregnancy outcome, Teratology, Water pollution

Kenen RH. 1993. Reproductive hazards in the workplace: Mending jobs, managing pregnancies. Binghamton, NY: Harrington Park Press, 306 pp. (Haworth women's studies)

Annotation: This book documents and explains the wide variety of workplace hazards faced by women with the purpose of helping women to reduce occupational risks while achieving the larger social objective of protecting all women's occupational health and safety. Key topics include: the biology of reproduction; the impact of the physical and social work environment on the pregnant woman; how to identify and minimize or avoid hazards in various types of work environments; how to weigh risks in the workplace and obtain accurate information about risks; and innovative approaches taken by women to make work safe and healthy, including successful organizing and lobbying techniques. Appendices contain lists of protective legislation, governmental regulatory agencies, and resource organizations.

Contact: Haworth Press, Taylor and Francis, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042, Telephone: (800) 634-7064 Secondary Telephone: Fax: E-mail: orders@taylorandfrancis.com Web Site: http://www.tandfonline.com/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Occupational safety and health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Reproductive hazards, Teratology, Women's health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1993. Congenital malformations surveillance: Data for birth defects prevention from Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) 1968-1991 and Birth Defects Monitoring Program (BDMP) 1970-1991. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 164 pp. (Reprint from Teratology. 48(6):545-709. December 1993)

Annotation: This reprint of an issue of Teratology presents information from two birth defects surveillance systems sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The systems are designed to collect and assess data on the occurrence of disease in order to learn where, when, and among whom disease is occurring so as to design appropriate prevention programs. The systems are the CDC's Birth Defect Monitoring Program (BDMP) and the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defect Program (MACDP). Most of this information is extensively in tabular and graphical form.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available in libraries.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Data, Population surveillance, Public health, Statistics, Teratology

Anderson B, Novick E. 1992. Fetal alcohol syndrome and pregnant women who abuse alcohol: An overview of the issue and the federal response. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 58 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the extent of the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) problem in the United States, gaps in knowledge and services related to FAS, and some of the current efforts to address these problems. Appendices provide a list of federal programs that serve alcohol-abusing pregnant women and individuals with FAS, and a list of congressional hearings on the subject.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Division of Children and Youth Policy, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 450G, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 690-5880 Contact Phone: (202) 245-1880 Limited number of copies available at no charge; also available for a fee from the National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161.

Keywords: Federal government, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Public policy, Substance abusing pregnant women, Teratology

Brown SS, ed. 1991. Children and parental illicit drug use: Research, clinical, and policy issues: Summary of a workshop. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 24 pp.

Annotation: This booklet summarizes the issues raised at the Workshop on Children and Parental Illicit Drug Use sponsored by the National Forum on the Future of Children and Families. Participants discussed the extent of illicit drug use among pregnant women and among the families in which children develop; the effects of drug use on fetuses, newborns, and older children; and the various intervention programs and policies developed to cope with the growing problems that illicit drug use poses for children and families.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available in libraries. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHD076.

Keywords: Cocaine, Drug abuse, Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Parenting, Parents, Teratology

National Health/Education Consortium. 1991. Healthy brain development: Precursor to learning. Washington, DC: National Health/Education Consortium, 13 pp. (National Health/Education Consortium occasional paper; no. 1)

Annotation: This report examines brain development as it is affected by a child's environment, social and physical stresses, and prenatal drug exposure. It also examines how these influences translate into learning deficiencies, language disabilities, and long-term academic failings. The report includes a series of recommendations to policymakers and members of health, science, and education communities in an effort to translate research into positive approaches on behalf of children.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 2008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: iel@iel.org Contact E-mail: nhec@iel.org Web Site: http://www.iel.org $5.00.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Brain, Cognitive development, Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Family life, Learning disabilities, Perinatal addiction, Social factors, Substance abusing pregnant women, Teratology

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. 1991. Genetics and teratology: An evaluation and assessment of the state of the science. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 182 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a multidisciplinary look at the state of the science of genetics and teratology and identifies promising research questions for the future. It is divided into four basic sections of embryogenesis, later development, teratology and clinical genetics, and developmental immunology. The report is heavily clinical and technically detailed in nature, although a more general executive summary is also provided.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Contact Phone: (301) 496-5097 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Available in libraries.

Keywords: Assessment, Evaluation, Genetic disorders, Genetics, Medical research, Teratology

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1990. Environmental exposures and pregnancy: A resource guide. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 18 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide lists books and journal articles related to various environmental exposures that may damage the developing fetus, including nicotine, alcohol, and cocaine. The resource guide also lists organizations and teratology hotlines that can provide additional information to health professionals and health care consumers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Environmental exposure, Maternal health, Pregnancy, Teratology

World Health Organization. 1986. Principles for evaluating health risks from chemicals during infancy and early childhood: The need for a special approach. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 73 pp. (Environmental health criteria; 59)

Annotation: This report describes the differences between infants and young children on one hand and adults on the other that lead to increased vulnerability in young children when exposed to chemicals. It discusses pathways of exposure, kinetics of absorption, biotransformation and elimination, effects of chemicals in the body, and modifying factors. Recommendations for health care workers are given.

Contact: WHO Press, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland, Telephone: +41 22 791 3264 Fax: +41 22 791 4857 E-mail: bookorders@who.int Web Site: http://apps.who.int/bookorders/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Environmental health, Infant health, Teratology

Pinkert TM. 1985. Current research on the consequences of maternal drug abuse. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute on Drug Abuse, 113 pp. (NIDA research monograph series; 59)

Annotation: This report discusses prenatal opioid exposure and the problem of causal inference, effects of prenatal exposure to cannabinoids, measurement of substance abuse during pregnancy, prenatal and postnatal exposure to marijuana, long-terms of prenatal methadone maintenance, effects of maternal narcotic vs nonnarcotic addiction on neonatal neurobehavior and infant development, and developmental consequences of maternal drug use during pregnancy.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available in libraries.

Keywords: Drug abuse, Mothers, Teratology, Women

World Health Organization. 1984. Principles for evaluating health risks to progeny associated with exposure to chemicals during pregnancy. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 177 pp. (Environmental health criteria; 30)

Annotation: This report is intended to aid in the design and assessment of studies concerned with exploring the association between exposure to chemicals during pregnancy and defective development. Topics discussed include processes involved in normal and abnormal development, methods of assessing prenatal toxic manifestations, postnatal manifestations, current and future applications of in-vitro developmental and non-mammalian animal systems, and human risk evaluation.

Contact: WHO Press, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland, Telephone: +41 22 791 3264 Fax: +41 22 791 4857 E-mail: bookorders@who.int Web Site: http://apps.who.int/bookorders/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Environmental health, Infant health, Maternal health, Teratology

Lavery JP, ed. 1981. Nutrition in pregnancy. Louisville, KY: University of Louisville, 113 pp.

Annotation: Compilation of talks given at the fifth national seminar on nutrition in pregnancy. Chapters include nutrition requirements, nutrition assessment, adolescent obstetrical programs, adolescent pregnancy nutrition, anorexia, physiology of pregnancy, diabetes, hypertension, gastrointestinal diseases, drugs, smoking, alcohol, patient education, magnesium deficiency and breast feeding.

Keywords: Anorexia, Magnesium deficiency, Maternal nutrition, Pregnancy complications, Teratology

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.