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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

Todd JE, Newman C, Ver Ploeg M. 2010. Changing participation in food assistance programs among low-income children after welfare reform. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 30 pp.

Annotation: This study investigates changes in the relative importance of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program and food assistance programs by examining changes in the program participation status of children's households and the amounts received from each program both before and after welfare reform. The study also explores how changes in participation status and benefit amounts differed according to household income before and after receiving benefits relative to the poverty line. Finally, the study estimates changes to the turnover rates in each program.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Children, Families, Income factors, Low income groups, Poverty, Research, Supplemental food programs, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Welfare reform

Zero to Three. 2009. Navigating the opportunities for families with young children in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: An interactive tool. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 142 pp.

Annotation: This set of slides provides comprehensive access to information about how the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) affects federal programs that serve infants, toddlers, and their families. Information for each program includes: an overview of the current program, the population served or eligible, the specific provisions in the ARRA, and potential ways in which programs and eligible families may use the recovery funds. The resource contains internal links to other slides in the set and external links to Web pages.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Families, Federal programs, Infants, Information sources, Insurance, Medicaid, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Toddlers

Collins A. 1997. Anticipating the effects of federal and state welfare changes on systems that serve children. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 11 pp. (Children and welfare reform issue brief; 2)

Annotation: This paper focuses on how federal and state welfare initiatives may have an impact on state and community policies and systems that serve children and families. It discusses the implications of welfare reform, strategies to link agencies so that they can best help children, and how to develop support systems to implement these strategies.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Access to health care, Block grants, Child care, Child health, Child welfare, Federal legislation, Health care reform, MCH programs, Medicaid, State health agencies, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Welfare reform

National Governors' Association, National Conference of State Legislatures, and American Public Welfare Association. 1996r. Analysis of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 conference agreement for H.R. 3734 (P.L. 104-193). [Online]. Washington, DC: National Governors' Association, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report provides commentary on the conference agreement for the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PL 104-193). For each of the major provisions of the act, the report explains its intent and clarifies the states' responsibilities for implementing it. The act itself makes modifications to welfare services within these topical areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), child care, Medicaid, social services, benefits for immigrants, supplemental security income (SSI), child protection, the Food Stamp program, child nutrition, electronic benefit transfer systems, and child support enforcement.

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Child abuse, Child care, Child nutrition, Child support, Federal legislation, Food Stamp Program, Immigrants, Prevention programs, Social services, Supplemental security income, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Time limited benefits, Welfare reform

Koyangi C, Schulzinger R. 1996. An uncertain future: How the new welfare law affects children with serious emotional disturbance and their families. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on the expected results of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 on the families of children with severe emotional disturbance. It discusses the loss of, or cuts in, help from Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Supplemental Security Income, nutrition programs, Medicaid coverage, and family support services. It mentions the difficulty of arranging adequate child care when the mother is forced to work, and other requirements that will add to the burdens of these families. It also discusses how the states can mitigate some of the difficulties.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Block grants, Child care, Child mental health, Child welfare, Children with special health care needs, Federal legislation, Medicaid, Regulations, Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Time limited benefits, Welfare reform

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.