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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 6 (6 total).

Poisson S. n.d.. Maternal and Child Health Cooperative Agreement [Final report]. Rockville, MD: Reginald S. Lourie Center for Infants and Young Children, 52 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to develop and implement comprehensive and family-centered approaches to early identification, assessment, and treatment of infants and young children who are at risk for or suffering from emotional and/or regulatory difficulties. To this end, the Regional Center for Infants and Young Children: (1) Monitored types of families and children referred to and receiving services from an agency specializing in the early detection of emotional disorders or potential risk; (2) developed principles and technology to identify infants and young children/families at risk for psychosocial and developmental difficulties; (3) developed comprehensive, family-centered approaches to assessment and diagnosis; (4) developed prevention-oriented, family-centered approaches to intervention; (5) developed and disseminated technical assistance and training approaches; (6) engaged State and local maternal and child health (MCH) agencies in the project; and (7) accessed multiple financial resources to support its efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158236.

Keywords: Affective Disorders, Behavioral Disorders, Data Collection, Family-Centered Health Care, High risk groups: Families, High risk infants, Parents, Regulatory Disorders, Screening Tools, Temperament

Allard LT, Hunter A. 2010. Understanding temperament in infants and toddlers. Nashville, TN: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning, (What works brief series, issue 23)

Annotation: This policy brief, which is geared toward caregivers of young children and families with young children, provides information about temperament in young children. It explains what temperament is; lists different types of temperament; and discusses why temperament is important, developing goodness of fit, and using knowledge about temperament to promote positive social-emotional development and behavior. A case study involving one child and her adjustment to a new home child care environment is included. A handout that care providers can use to understand their own temperament and that of the children in their care is also available.

Contact: Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning , Vanderbilt University, Box 328 GPC, Nashville, TN 37203, Telephone: (615) 322-3978 Secondary Telephone: (866) 433-1966 Fax: (615) 343-1570 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel Available from the website.

Keywords: Child behavior, Child care, Child care workers, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Temperament, Young children

Fish M. 2001. Infant Temperament: Neonatal–5 years in Rural Appalachia: [Final report]. Huntington, WV: Marshall University, 34 pp.

Annotation: This is a continuation of an earlier funded project on infant temperament. Two research questions were addressed in this study. First, what continuity exists between (1) certain temperament and mother-infant relationship qualities in infancy, and (2) both preschool behavior problems and early school adjustment? Second, how do environmental factors such as poverty and low parental education levels, cultural values regarding education and achievement, and individual differences in temperament and mother-child relations interact to influence early school adjustment and performance? [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-101954.

Keywords: Attachment Behavior, Cultural Sensitivity, Infant Temperament, MCH Research, Preschool Children, Preschool Children, Research, Rural Population, Rural Population

Fish M. 1997. Infant temperament: Stability and change in rural America. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 3 pp. (Research roundtable summary; no. 18)

Annotation: This abstract describes a project that examined infant and family characteristics and interactional processes associate with stability and change in temperament in a group of economically disadvantaged, rural Appalachian infants.

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child behavior, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Infants, MCH research, Rural population, Temperament, Young children

Fish M. 1996. Infant Temperament: Stability and Change in Rural Appalachia: [Final report]. Huntington, WV: Marshall University School of Medicine, 33 pp.

Annotation: This study examined conditions associated with stability and change in infant temperament in a high-risk population of economically disadvantaged rural Appalachian mothers and infants. The aims of the study were to: (1) Identify infant, mother, and family demographic variables that predict stability and change in difficulty and social responsiveness; (2) determine antecedent social/contextual characteristics and maternal characteristics as well as neonatal infant variables that predict stability and change in temperament; (3) relate patterns of stability and change in temperament to the quality of mother-infant interaction over the first year of life and to attachment security at 15 months of life; and (4) evaluate the risk of less optimal early socioemotional development associated with each of the variables measured. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-155394.

Keywords: Appalachians, Emotional Health, Infant Temperament, MCH Research, Research

Frankenburg WK, ed. 1978. Second International Conference on Developmental Screening. Denver, CO: University of Colorado Medical Center, John F. Kennedy Child Development Center, 335 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings discuss how to promote more and better research in developmental screening. The document presents the work of researchers in the field and critiques of their presentations. Topics addressed were screening tools; predictive indices; developmental profiles; early detection; infant attention; high risk children; developmental approaches to routine health procedures; prediction of school performance and school problems from infant and preschool developmental screening; the impact of community intervention based on early screening; home environment, learning process, and IQ; home screening questionnaires; application of decision analysis in selecting cut-off scores; parent interview predictors of teacher ratings of school adaption; comparison of the Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST) with the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales (GMDS); two or three stage screening procedure comparison; comparison between the mailing method and office method of the prescreening developmental questionnaire; implementing a comprehensive screening system without reinventing the wheel; temperament and the handicapped child; and Boel screening in Sweden and Finland.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child development, Conferences, Developmental screening, Early intervention, High risk children, Infants, Intelligence tests, Learning, Parents, Research, Screening tests, Temperament

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.