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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (121 total).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. n.d.. Bringing it together: Head Start-state collaboration projects. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an introduction to the Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, which involve Head Start in state planning and policy making efforts that affect low income children and families. It includes some fact sheets on the Collaboration Projects, project profiles and contact list, legislation regarding Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, and an excerpt from the report of the Advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and Expansion.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early childhood education, Family support, Head Start, Low income groups, Policy development, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, State initiatives, Statewide planning

Magrab P. n.d.. Networking and Community-Based Services for Children with Special Needs: [Final report]. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Medical Center, 45 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to achieve comprehensive, coordinated, community-based services for children with special health needs and their families through improved collaboration among parents and public and private agencies at all levels within the service delivery system. Activities included maintaining a network of States, facilitating coalitions within States, brokering technical assistance, organizing conferences, and developing materials on topics such as the financing of services, service provision to culturally diverse groups, rural services, and collaboration between mental health professionals and other health care providers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147130.

Keywords: Child Care, Chronically Ill, Collaboration of Care, Community-Based Health Care, Families, Family-Based Health Care, Financing, Grandparents, Medicaid, Networks, Parent Support Groups, Parents, Rural Population

Sherman B. n.d.. Home-Based Support Services for Chronically Ill Children and Their Families [Final report]. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to demonstrate that a system of reimbursable, cost-effective, home-based support services can be implemented for families with chronically ill children. The project objectives were to facilitate the provision of home-based care for chronically ill children through the following activities: (1) Developing a regional network of medically skilled respite providers; (2) establishing self-help mutual support groups for chronically ill children and their parents and siblings; (3) training professionals, paraprofessionals, and volunteers; and (4) disseminating project findings and recommendations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158699.

Keywords: Arthritis, Asthma, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Congenital Heart Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, Families, Feeding Disorders, Hemophilia, Home-Based Health Care, Kidney Disease, Leukemia, Low income groups, Muscular Dystrophy, Nurses, Respiratory Technologies, Respite Care, Sick Kids (Need) Involved People (SKIP), Sickle Cell Disease, Support Groups, Tay-Sachs Disease, Ventilator Dependence

Hostler S. n.d.. Family Autonomy Project [Final report]. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia, 50 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to ensure the successful transition to adulthood of adolescents with physical disabilities or chronic illnesses by means of interventions with families, the health care team, and the adolescents themselves. The project sought to encourage the involvement of families in planning for the health care of their children, to modify staff behaviors and institutional practices to promote family autonomy, and to broaden treatment goals so that they included health maintenance and future planning for adolescents with special needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196962.

Keywords: ., Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Families, Family-Centered Health Care Transition, Support Groups

New York State Department of Health, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children. n.d.. Making it work toolkit. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, Division of Chronic Disease Prevention and the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, multiple items.

Annotation: These toolkits for consumers and employers provide information to address the challenges of low income wage earners returning to work while continuing to breastfeed. Contents include five individual toolkits. A toolkit for mothers provides information on how to talk with supervisors, coworkers, and child care providers and how to store and handle breast milk, as well as checklists, tips, sample schedules, and food ideas. A toolkit for family members explains the role grandparents and partners play while dispelling myths that can be held by others, and how to give support and care for a breastfed infant. Additional toolkits are designed to help employers comply with state and federal laws; offer guidance for mothers and employers on interpreting the laws and resources; and provide sample letters and policies.

Contact: New York State Department of Health, Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237, Telephone: (866) 881-2809 E-mail: dohweb@health.state.ny.us Web Site: http://www.health.ny.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Employer initiatives, Legislation, Low income groups, New York, State programs, Supported employment, Workplace health promotion

Community Preventive Services Task Force. 2016. Promoting health equity. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide evidence-based recommendations and findings about what works to promote health equity in the community. Topics include education programs and policies, culturally competent health care, and housing programs and policies. Presentation and promotional materials are included.

Contact: Community Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MSE69, Atlanta, GA 30329, Telephone: (404) 498-6595 E-mail: communityguide@cdc.gov Web Site: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-members Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Early childhood education, Low income groups, After school programs, Child development centers, Community based programs, Community development, Community health centers, Consumer education materials, Culturally competent services, Education, Educational attainment, Equal opportunities, Financial support, Health care delivery, Health education, Health promotion, Housing, Kindergarten, Patient education materials, Public policy, Recruitment, Research, Retention, School based clinics, Training, Translation, Work force

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2016. Medicaid-fee-for-service: State resources vary for helping beneficiaries find providers. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the proportion and characteristics of Medicaid beneficiaries served in fee-for-service arrangements and federal and state resources to help them find participating providers and report related challenges. A discussion of state actions to address access challenges is included. The report addresses medical care and specialty services such as behavioral/mental health care, oral health care, vision care, pharmacies, and ancillary services such as transportation and translation and sign language services.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: GAO-16-809.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Consumer satisfaction, Family support services, Hotlines, Information sources, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Provider participation, Service delivery systems, State programs

Coalition for Community Schools, Communities in Schools, Strive Together. 2016. Aligning networks to enable every student to thrive. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document describes progress toward educational equity and opportunities to achieve shared goals by aligning assets and expertise across networks, school districts, and communities. Contents include a unifying concept of student-centered education and five principles for driving the work. Topics include trusting relationships, cross-sector partnerships, purposeful engagement, actionable data, and shared accountability.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Collaboration, Community action, Data, Education, Equal opportunities, Ethnic groups, Networking, Policy development, Poverty, Public private partnerships, Race, Social support, Trust

Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count. 2014. Race for results: Building a path to opportunity for all children. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 32 pp. (KIDS COUNT policy report)

Annotation: This report explores the intersection of children, race, and opportunity. Features include the Race for Results index, which compares how children are progressing on key milestones across racial and ethnic groups at the national and state levels. Topics include 12 indicators that measure a child's success in each stage of life, from birth to adulthood, in the areas of early childhood; education and early work; family supports; and neighborhood context. Policy recommendations are included.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 Web Site: http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Education, Ethnic groups, Family support, Infants, Measures, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Race, Racial groups, Work force, Young children

American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress; National Council of La Raza. 2014. Peer support in health: Evidence to action–An expert panel of the National Peer Support Collaborative Learning Network. Leawood, KS: American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes discussions from a national conference held on November 12–13, 2013, in Washington, DC, to discuss current strengths and future needs in the field of peer support. Contents include key findings, background and review of the evidence, and key features of peer support. Topics include conceptual and strategic issues, program development, evaluation of peer support, organizational and system issues, and program sustainability. Recommendations and areas for future work are included.

Contact: American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation, Peers for Progress, 11400 Tomahawk Creek Parkway, Suite 440, Leawood, KS 66211-2672, Telephone: (800) 274-2237 Secondary Telephone: (913) 906-6000 Fax: (913) 906-6095 Web Site: http://peersforprogress.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community based services, Community health aides, Conference proceedings, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Financing, Health care delivery, International programs, Model programs, Peer counseling, Peer education, Peer groups, Peer support programs, Program development, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Public health programs, Quality assurance, Service delivery systems, Service integration, Sustainability, Systems development

Hernandez DJ, Napierala JS. 2014. Mother's education and children's outcomes: How dual-generation programs offer increased opportunities for America's families. New York, NY: Foundation for Child Development, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the need for dual-generation strategies for families with low income and education levels to assure strong educational outcomes and upward economic mobility. The report describes the following three components of a comprehensive dual-generation strategy: high-quality early childhood education (pre-kindergarten through third grade); sectoral job training leading to a certificate, credential, or degree for high-wage/high-demand jobs; and wrap-around family and peer support services. Additional topics include results of an analysis of 13 economic, education, and health indicators, which highlight disparities in the well-being experienced by children with four different levels of mother's education. Opportunities for federal, state, and local governments are included.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Child health, Early childhood education, Educational attainment, Family support services, Government role, Intergenerational programs, Low income groups, Mothers, Statistical data, Vocational education, Work force

Moodie S, Ramos M. 2014. Culture counts: Engaging black and Latino parents of young children in family support programs. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 16 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of family support programs and identifies the features and strategies that may be most effective for reaching and engaging black and Latino families, with the ultimate goal of supporting young children's development. Contents include a synthesis of available research on parent engagement and potential barriers to their engagement in family support services and programs. Recommendations for designing, adapting, and evaluating culturally-relevant family support programs and services are also included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Child development services, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Families, Family support programs, Parent participation, Parents, Research, Young children

Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

Pew Charitable Trusts, Home Visiting Campaign. 2013. Expanding home visiting research: New measures of success. [Philadelphia, PA]: Pew Charitable Trusts, Home Visiting Campaign, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights key findings from research conducted to build evidence needed to inform policymakers' decisions related to home visiting and to advance effective practice in home visiting programs. The brief also identifies opportunities for program improvements in states and for further study. Findings are presented in the following areas: lasting benefits of home visiting, for whom is home visiting effective, the importance of focused program content and of measurement, and what it means to be evidence-based.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Families, Family support services, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Public policy, Research, State programs, Young children

Johnston J and Stratus. 2013. Putting children first: Scenarios for the future of children's health and well being in the U.S.. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 35 pp. (Report)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the process by which scenarios about the future of children's health and well-being were created for a forum of philanthropists and children' health experts held in Aspen, CO, in July 2012. The report shares the scenarios, which paint four different portraits of how the state of children's health and well-being could evolve over the next several decades. The report also shares insights and implications that emerged from participants' interactions with the scenarios at the forum, as well as how these scenarious might be used to empower new actions and strategies for transforming the future of children's health and well-being.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child development, Child health, Economic factors, Educational factors, Families, Family support services, Health services, Low income groups, Social factors, Social services, Trends

Michalopoulos C, Duggan A, Knox V, Filene JH, Lee H, Snell EK, Crowne S, Lunquist E, Corso PS, Ingels JB. 2013. Revised design for the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program evaluation. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 101 pp. (OPRE report 2013-18)

Annotation: This report describes plans for a national evaluation of the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program (MIHOPE), a program launched in 2011 by the Administration for Children and Families and the Health Resources and Services Administration within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Contents include an overview, background on home visiting and goals for the evaluation, an overview of the proposed evaluation design, a sampling plan for the evaluation, the implementation study, the impact analysis and analysis of health systems outcomes, and the economic evaluation.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Costs, Families, Family support services, Federal programs, Health systems, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Program evaluation, Social services, Women's health

Gwaltney MK, Goodson B, Walker DK. 2013. Cross-site evaluation of SAMHSA's Project Launch initiative: Key findings in the first year. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 64 pp. (OPRE report # 2013-59)

Annotation: This document describes the activities of the first year of Project Launch, a program whose primary objective is to promote the social, emotional, behavioral, and physical health and cognitive development of young children from birth to 8 years of age. The project has 24 grantees in three cohorts to work with a pilot community for five years, pursuing dual goals of improving systems and services. The document describes the components of the program and the process of the evaluation of the first year.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Communities, Community programs, Families, Family support services, Health promotion, Infants, Initiatives, Low income groups, National programs, Prevention, Program evaluation, Public health, Service delivery systems, State programs, Young children

American Self-Help Clearinghouse. 2012. The self-help group sourcebook online. Cedar Knolls, NJ: American Self-Help Clearinghouse,

Annotation: This online resource directory lists national self-help groups that focus on specific life problems including abuse, addictions, bereavement, disabilities, family and parenting, health, mental health, and miscellaneous topics. It also lists clearinghouses that can help the reader identify local groups and specialty toll-free numbers by topic, and discusses what self-help groups do and how to set one up.

Contact: American Self-Help Group Clearinghouse, , 375 East McFarland Street , Dover, NJ 07801, Telephone: 973-989-1122 Secondary Telephone: Fax: 973-989-1159 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.mentalhelp.net/selfhelp/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Directories, Self help groups, Support groups

Bandy T, Andrews KM, Moore KA. 2012. Disadvantaged families and child outcomes: The importance of emotional support for mothers. Child Trends, 9 pp. (Research-to-results brief)

Annotation: This research brief focuses on the link between the level of support that mothers facing social and economic disadvantages receive in raising their children and their children's development. The brief provides background on the challenges faced by children from socially and emotionally disadvantaged families, describes the analysis the authors conducted, and presents findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Family support, High risk groups, Income factors, Low income groups, Mental health, Mothers, Research, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

Speilberger J, Gitlow E, Winje C, Harden A, Banman A, Dadisman K. 2012. Building a system of support for evidence-based home visiting programs in Illinois: Findings from year 2 of the Strong Foundations evaluation. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 121 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information from an evaluation of home visiting programs in Illinois that are part of Strong Foundations—a program that supports the implementation, scaling up, and sustainability of evidence-based home-visiting programs for the prevention of child maltreatment. The report presents perspectives on the state system from key informants at state and local program levels and discusses local programs with a focus on five main topics: characteristics of communities and programs, staff training and supervision, program quality and fidelity, programs' ability to meet families' needs, and the availability of and linkages to other community services and resources.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child maltreatment, Communities, Family support services, Home visiting, Illinois, Local programs, Low income groups, Prevention, Program evaluation, State programs, Training

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.