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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (33 total).

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Food security and nutrition assistance programs: Professional resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Weinfield NS, Mills G, Borger C, Gearing M, Macaluso T, Montaquila J, Zedlewski S. 2014. Hunger in America 2014: National report. Chicago, IL: Feeding America, 161 pp., exec. summ. (24 pp.).

Annotation: This report documents the role that the charitable food assistance network plays in supporting families in the United States. Topics include collecting data about food programs and their clients, the national network of food programs, characteristics of program clients and their households, and their use of food assistance. Surveys and data tables and figures are included.

Contact: Feeding America, 35 East Wacker Drive, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60601, Web Site: http://feedingamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Charities, Data collection, Family support programs, Financing, Food banks, Food supply, Local initiatives, National initiatives, Networking, Nutrition, Supplemental food programs

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2013. WIC program: Improved oversight of income eligibility determination needed. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study on the determination of income eligibility for recipients of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program. Included in the report are answers to the following questions: (1) How do state and local criteria for determining WIC income eligibility vary? (2) To what extent are individuals who would otherwise be ineligible for WIC deemed eligible due to their participation in other programs? (3) How does the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) assist and monitor state determination of WIC income eligibility? The report is based on the Government Accountability Office's (GAO's) review of federal laws and regulations; an analysis of USDA's national data from 2010, recent survey findings, and monitoring reports; reviews of WIC policy manuals from 10 states chosen to provide population size and geographic diversity; and interviews with federal, state, and local officials. Recommendations based on GAO's findings are included in the report.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-13-290.

Keywords: Accountability, Child nutrition, Eligibility determination, Infant nutrition, Maternal nutrition, Reports, Supplemental food programs, WIC Program

Mabli J, Ohls J, Dragoset L, Castner L, Santos B. 2013. Measuring the effect of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation on food security. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 65 pp. (Nutrition assistance program report)

Annotation: This report presents findings of a survey of the Supplemental Food and Nutrition Program (SNAP), which provides nutrition-assistance benefits to individuals and families with low incomes. The purpose of the survey, which was conducted between October 2011 and September 2012, was to assess the effect of SNAP on food security and food spending in the post-2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act environment of higher SNAP allotments. The report assesses how household food security and food expenditures vary with SNAP participating and discusses how the relationship between SNAP and food security and between SNAP and food expenditures vary by key household characteristics and circumstances and what factors distinguish between food secure and food insecure SNAP households with children.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Costs, FInancing, Families, Food, Hunger, Low income groups, Nutrition, Prevention, Program evaluation, Statistical data, Supplemental food programs, Surveys

Coleman-Jensen A, Nord M, Andrews M, Carlson S. 2012. Household food security in the United States in 2011. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 29 pp. (Economic research report no. 141)

Annotation: This report updates the national statistics on food security, household food spending, the use of federal and community food and nutrition assistance by food-insecure households, and the numbers of households using community food pantries and emergency kitchens, using data collected in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's 2011 food security survey.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Families, Federal programs, Food supply, Local programs, Low income groups, Nutrition, Statistical data, Supplemental food programs

Ettinger de Cuba S, Weiss I, Pasquariello J, Schiffmiller A, Frank DA, Coleman S, Breen A, Cook J. 2012. The SNAP vaccine: Boosting children's health. Boston, MA: Children's HealthWatch, 6 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief provides information about SNAP, a federal program that helps participants afford a nutritionally adequate diet each month, with a particular focus on ensuring that young children have adequate nutrition during this period of rapid brain development. The brief provides an overview of who SNAP supports and how it supports them, and also discusses food insecurity during the recession that began in 2008, other basic needs provided by the program, how the program helps immigrant families, how increasing SNAP benefit levels improves family diet quality and children's health, the cost of a healthy diet, and policy solutions.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Cognitive development, Cost, Early childhood development, Economic factors, Families, Federal programs, Immigrants, Nutrition, Public policy, Supplemental food programs, Young children

Keith-Jennings B. 2012. SNAP plays a critical role in helping children. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report describes how the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly the Food Stamp Program, provides benefits that help nearly one in three children in the United States maintain a nutritionally adequate diet. It describes the size and scope of SNAP and the ways in which children benefit from the program. According to the report, SNAP has been shown to reduce levels of poverty, increase food security, and improve help outcomes for children. Estimated program costs are included, along with statistics on SNAP recipients such as the percentage of families who are in poverty or extreme poverty and the general age groups of children who benefit.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Hunger, Low income groups, National programs, Poverty, Research, Statistics, Supplemental food programs

Cervantes W. 2011. Children of immigrants and nutrition supports. Washington, DC: First Focus, 2 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses food insecurity among children of immigrants, its consequences, and programs that are available to help. The paper explains why immigrant parents frequently fail to make use of such programs, even if they are eligible; why some programs are more successful than others at enrolling immigrant families; and the effect of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Eligibility, Enrollment, Hunger, Immigrants, Low income groups, Outreach, Parents, Poverty, Programs, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, Supplemental food programs, WIC program

Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. 2011. Online services for key low-income benefit programs: What states provide online with respect to SNAP, TANF, child care assistance, Medicaid, and CHIP. Washington, DC: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on state information available online for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, child care assistance, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Program. The paper presents an overview of findings related to what online information these programs provide and a list of links, organized by state.

Contact: Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 820 First Street N.E., Suite 510, Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 408-1080 Fax: (202) 408-1056 E-mail: center@cbpp.org Web Site: http://www.cbpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Children's Health Insurance Program, Costs, Government financing, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public assistance, State programs, Supplemental food programs, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

Eslami E, Filion K, Strayer M. 2011. Characteristics of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program households: Fiscal year 2010. Washington, DC: Mathematica, 125 pp. (Nutrition assistance program report series)

Annotation: This report presents a picture of households and individuals participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in fiscal year 2010. The report provides an overview of SNAP, including the regulations used to determine eligibility and benefits and factors that affect program participation and costs,such as national economic trends. The report also presents characteristics of participants in detailed tables.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website. Document Number: Report No. SNAP-11-CHAR.

Keywords: Costs, Eligibility, Enrollment, Income factors, Low income groups, National programs, Poverty, Supplemental food programs, Trends,

Todd JE, Newman C, Ver Ploeg M. 2010. Changing participation in food assistance programs among low-income children after welfare reform. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 30 pp.

Annotation: This study investigates changes in the relative importance of the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program and the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program and food assistance programs by examining changes in the program participation status of children's households and the amounts received from each program both before and after welfare reform. The study also explores how changes in participation status and benefit amounts differed according to household income before and after receiving benefits relative to the poverty line. Finally, the study estimates changes to the turnover rates in each program.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Children, Families, Income factors, Low income groups, Poverty, Research, Supplemental food programs, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Welfare reform

Finegold K, Kramer FD, Saloner B, Parnes J. 2008. The role of the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (CSFP) in nutritional assistance to mothers, infants, children, and seniors. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 71 pp. (Contractor and cooperator report no. 48)

Annotation: This report looks at how the Commodity Supplemental Food Program (which provides supplemental food packages to about half a million low-income pregnant and postpartum women) operates, who participates in it, how it fits into the overall food assistance landscape, and what are states' expectations for its future use, in relation to other food assistance programs and target populations. Program eligibility and participation are also addressed.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Commodity Supplemental Food Program, Eligibility, Enrollment, Federal programs, Low income groups, Nutrition, Postpartum women, Pregnant women

Rosso R, Weill J. 2007. State of the States: A profile of food and nutrition programs across the nation. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, annual.

Annotation: This report provides information on federal food and nutrition programs throughout the United States. Statistics are provided for the United States as a whole and for each state in the following areas: percentage of food-insecure households, demographics, and participation in the following programs: School Breakfast Program, National School Lunch Program, Summer Nutrition Program, Food Stamp Program, WIC, Child and Adult Care Food Program, The Emergency Food Assistance Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program. Additional statistical information is presented in tables at the end of the report. A list of sources is included.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ $12; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition programs, Commodity Supplemental Food Program, Federal programs, Food, Food Stamp Program, Hunger, Nutrition, Nutrition programs, Poverty, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, WIC Program

Foster LK, Gerould P. 2004. Fathers' impact on children's nutrition. Sacramento, CA: California Research Bureau, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is based on input from focus groups and research, looks at the relationship between fathers and children as it relates to children's nutrition. The report offers several options for policymakers that focus on targeting and outreach to fathers. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains the following sections: (1) nutrition as a public policy issue, (2) fathers' involvement with their children, (3) fathers, children, and food, (4) food assistance resources, (5) a note about physical activity, (6) options for action, (7) bibliography, and (8) endnotes. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes black-and-white drawings.

Contact: California Research Bureau, California State Library, 900 N Street, Suite 300, Sacramento, CA 94237-0001, Telephone: (916) 445-3551 Secondary Telephone: (916) 653-7843 Fax: (916) 654-5829 E-mail: crb@library.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.library.ca.gov/crb/index.html Available from the website. Document Number: CRB 04-002.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Fathers, Food banks, Low income groups, Obesity, Outreach, Parent child relations, Physical activity, Public policy, Supplemental food programs

Tasse T, Ohls J. 2003. Reaching more hungry children: The seamless summer food waiver. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 4 pp. (Issue brief, no. 1)

Annotation: This brief summarizes Mathematica's study of the Seamless Summer Food Waiver, a federal initiative to help school food authorities reach a larger number of hungry children in low-income areas during the summer months. Topics include bridging the nutrition gap, origins and operations of the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), the program's attractiveness to sponsors, financial implications, states' role in innovations, and recommendations for the future.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Federal initiatives, Food services, Hunger, Low income groups, School food services, Supplemental food programs

Fox HB, McManus MA, Schmidt HJ. 2003. WIC reauthorization: Opportunities for improving the nutritional status of women, infants, and children. Washington, DC: George Washington University, National Health Policy Forum, 35 pp. (NHPF background paper)

Annotation: This paper examines the main reform issues affecting the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). The paper discusses the growth of participation and funding of the program, its links to health care and its impact on health outcomes. It also raises considerations for the future of the program including food package and program eligibility changes, nutrition education strategies to reduce obesity, financial risks and health consequences of relying on infant formula rebates, and new opportunities for research and demonstration. The appendix includes a table illustrating the state-by-state maximum allowable income for WIC eligibility for four categories of participants. Charts, graphs, and references are also included.

Contact: National Health Policy Forum, George Washington University, 2131 K Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 872-1390 E-mail: nhpf@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.nhpf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Eligibility, Federal programs, Low income groups, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition programs, Program descriptions, Program descriptions, State surveys, Supplemental food programs, WIC Program, Young children

U.S. Food and Consumer Service, Office of Analysis and Evaluation. 1997. Early childhood and child care study: Summary of findings. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Food and Consumer Service, Office of Analysis and Evaluation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes data from a study of the Child and Adults Care Food Program (CACFP), a federal program that provides meals and snacks in child and adult day care facilities, including family and group day care homes, Head Start centers, and some child care centers. Topics include characteristics of participating homes and centers, characteristics of children and their families, meals and snacks offered by and consumed by CACFP providers, and nutrition knowledge and practices of CACFP food preparers.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Child and Adult Care Food Program, Child care, Child nutrition, Federal programs, Reports, Statistics, Supplemental food programs

National Governors' Association, National Conference of State Legislatures, and American Public Welfare Association. 1996r. Analysis of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 conference agreement for H.R. 3734 (P.L. 104-193). [Online]. Washington, DC: National Governors' Association, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report provides commentary on the conference agreement for the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PL 104-193). For each of the major provisions of the act, the report explains its intent and clarifies the states' responsibilities for implementing it. The act itself makes modifications to welfare services within these topical areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), child care, Medicaid, social services, benefits for immigrants, supplemental security income (SSI), child protection, the Food Stamp program, child nutrition, electronic benefit transfer systems, and child support enforcement.

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Child abuse, Child care, Child nutrition, Child support, Federal legislation, Food Stamp Program, Immigrants, Prevention programs, Social services, Supplemental security income, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Time limited benefits, Welfare reform

Laudencia AZ, Stark S, Morrison DR, eds. 1996. Feeding our families: Community food security in the District of Columbia. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, DC Family Policy Seminar, 24 pp. (DC Family Policy Seminar background briefing report)

Annotation: This is one in a series of briefing reports and seminar highlights that provide information and policy options concerning issues affecting children and families to policymakers in the District of Columbia. The briefing report discusses key components of food security, consequences of inadequate food security, federal and local efforts to combat the effects of food insecurity, and policy options. It includes a list of local and national organizations, and a bibliography. The seminar highlights give summaries of the presentations and of the question-and-answer session that concluded the seminar. Other topics addressed include parenting programs, welfare to work transition, fundraising, and preventing injury in schools. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: District of Columbia, Hunger, Prevention programs, Public policy, Supplemental food programs

Hull MA, Runyan DH. 1990. The migrant farmworker nutrition manual. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Child Development Center, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This comprehensive manual is a practical reference designed to enhance nutrition services in migrant health centers. The manual has specific sections for physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nutritionists, and paraprofessionals such as outreach workers and health aides. The major topics are: evaluating nutrition status; eating for health; addressing special concerns; and maximizing food resources. Special focus topics are food and drug interactions, developmental disabilities, and nutrition folk medicine. The appendices include growth charts, nutrition screening forms, and case studies. A packet of handout material in both English and Spanish is included for easy reproduction. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Community health services, Developmental disabilities, Educational materials, Low literacy materials, Migrants, Nutrition, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition consultation, SPRANS, Spanish language materials, Supplemental food programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.