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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 12 (12 total).

Delta Dental of Michigan. 2019. Rethink your drink, choose water. Okemos, MI: Delta Dental Foundation, 2 items.

Annotation: This document provides information about sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and tips on healthy alternatives. Topics include the potential impact of SSB consumption on oral health; the amount of sugar in different beverages; and recommended daily limits on sugar for infants, children, adolescents, and adults. Tips for reducing SSB consumption, including juice consumption, and choosing water are inclduded.

Contact: Delta Dental Foundation, 4100 Okemos Road, Okemos, MI 48864, Telephone: (800) 524-0149 Web Site: http://www.deltadentalmi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Consumer education materials, Decision making, Fluid intake, Health behavior, Infants, Oral health, Resources for professionals, Sugar, Water

Harris JL, Romo-Palafox M, Choi YY, Kibwana A. 2019. Children's Drink FACTS 2019: Sales, nutrition, and marketing of children's drinks. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 78 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on children’s drinks, defined as drinks intended for children ages 2–11 to consume, as indicated on brand websites. The report identifies and analyzes sweetened children’s drinks in the fruit drink, flavored water, and drink mix categories as well as those without added sweeteners (added sugars or low-calorie sweeteners) in the 100 percent juice, juice/water blend, and plain water/seltzer categories. Topics include the children’s drink market, children’s drink nutrition, on-package marketing, and advertising.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advertising, Artificial sweeteners, Marketing, Nutrition, Oral health, Sugar

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health. 2016. Social factors affecting pediatric oral health in North Dakota. Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about students' oral hygiene practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages. It discusses third-grade students' access to toothbrushes, toothbrushing and flossing practices, and consumption of sugar-containing beverages, as well as whether they have visited a dentist; middle school students’ toothbrushing practices and consumption of sugar-containing beverages; and high school students’ consumption of soda.

Contact: University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Center for Rural Health, 1301 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (701) 777-3848 Fax: (701) 777-6779 E-mail: ruralhealth@med.und.edu Web Site: https://ruralhealth.und.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, American Indians, Children, Dental caries, Health behavior, Low income groups, Minority groups, North Dakota, Nutrition, Oral health, Oral hygiene, Prevalence, Rural population, Social factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Sugar

First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, Healthy+Active Before 5. 2015–. Sugar Bites. Concord, CA: First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, multiple items.

Annotation: These brochures, posters, videos, and web graphics are part of a public-awareness campaign aimed at preventing the development of chronic diseases by encouraging parents to choose water for young children instead of drinks that are high in sugar. The resources focus on reducing children’s risk for obesity, dental caries, and diabetes by reducing their consumption of flavored milk, juice drinks, soda, and sports drinks. The resources are available in English and in Spanish.

Contact: First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, 1485 Civic Court, Suite 1200, Concord, CA 94520, Telephone: (925) 771-7300 Web Site: http://www.first5coco.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Consumer education materials, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Fluid intake, Food consumption, Local initiatives, Multimedia, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Public awareness campaigns, Resource materials, Risk factors, Spanish language materials, Sugar, Water, Young children

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2015. Sugary drinks in communities of color: Recent research and policy options to reduce consumption. Washington, DC: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 20 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief investigates sugary drink consumption in communities of color, focusing on the public health impact and marketing of such products, and policy options to facilitate healthy beverage consumption. It also discusses how decision makers can work to prevent childhood obesity and related illnesses by advancing policies to reduce the marketing and appeal of sugary drinks—and increase the availability of healthy alternatives—in communities of color.

Contact: Leadership for Healthy Communities, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5112 E-mail: info@leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Web Site: http://www.leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Marketing, Minority groups, Minority health, Nutrition, Obesity, Policy development, Sugar

University of California, San Francisco, Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital. 2015. Share the love, share the water. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital, 1 video (3 min.).

Annotation: This video is designed to encourage families to drink water. The video also provides information about avoiding beverages containing sugar to prevent diseases such as diabetes and dental caries.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Center for Vulnerable Populations at San Francisco General Hospital, Department of Medicine, UCSF-SFGH Box 1364, 1001 Potrero Avenue, Building 10, W13, San Francisco, CA 94110, Telephone: (415) 206-5277 Fax: (415) 206-7880 Web Site: http://cvp.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Dental caries, Diabetes, Disease prevention, Families, Nutrition, Oral health, Spanish language materials, Sugar, Water

National Policy and Legal Analysis Network. 2014. Model legislation requiring a safety warning for sugar-sweetened beverages. Oakland, CA: ChangeLab Solutions, 33 pp., plus appendix (14 pp.).

Annotation: This document provides model legislation for states implementing a policy requiring a safety warning on sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) containers and packaging. Contents include model legislation to assist states seeking to increase consumer awareness about the health risks of consuming SSBs and to help them to make informed choices. An accompanying set of evidence-based facts that support the legislation is also available.

Contact: ChangeLab Solutions, 2201 Broadway, Suite 502, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 302-3380 Web Site: http://changelabsolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education, Food labeling, Health behaviors, Health policy, Nutrition, Policy development, Public awareness campaigns, Public policy, Regulations, State legislation, Sugar

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Healthy Eating Research. 2013. Recommendations for healthier beverages. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and the corresponding risk of poor diet quality, obesity, diet-related health problems, and poor oral health. The paper provides detailed lists of recommended beverages for the following ages ranges: ages 2–4, 5–10, 11–13, 14–18, and 19 and above. A rationale for the recommendations is provided, along with a discussion of key findings of a panel of experts.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adults, Child health, Diet, Food consumption, Health, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Risk factors, Sugar

National Policy and Legal Analysis Network. 2013. Sugar-sweetened beverages playbook. Oakland, CA: ChangeLab Solutions, 21 pp. plus 1 poster.

Annotation: This guide presents a 10-strategy path to reduce sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption and improve health in communities and states. Contents include an example and a key resource, usually a model policy, for each strategy. Topics include public education campaigns and restrictions on the availability of SSBs. A poster is also available.

Contact: ChangeLab Solutions, 2201 Broadway, Suite 502, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 302-3380 Web Site: http://changelabsolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Community health, Consumer education, Health behaviors, Health policy, Legislation, Nutrition, Policy development, Public awareness campaigns, Public policy, Strategic plans, Sugar

Indiana Dental Association. 2013. Drinks Destroy Teeth. Indianapolis, IN: Indiana Dental Association, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help teachers and health professionals inform the public about the potentially harmful oral health effects of consuming acidic and sugar-laden drinks. The resources include lesson plans and a supporting mobile application; a handout (in color or black and white) that ranks common drinks according to their sugar and acid content; a presentation that can be used in the classroom, in a training session, in a public health setting, or in a dental office waiting room; and a video about the amount of sugar, acidity level, and pH of common drinks. The handout is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Indiana Dental Association, 1319 East Stop 10 Road, Indianapolis, IN 46227, Telephone: (317) 634-2610 Secondary Telephone: (800) 562-5646 Fax: (317) 634-2612 E-mail: jhawke@indental.org Web Site: http://www.indental.org/ Available at no charge.

Keywords: Children, Consumer education materials, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Health promotion, Mobile applications, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Oral health, Outreach, Resources for professionals, Spanish language materials, Sugar

Giancoli A, Soto R. 2011. Sugary drinks: A big problem for little kids. Los Angeles, CA: First 5 LA, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief discusses the prevalence of sugary or sweetened drinks such as soda, juices, sports drinks, bottled teas, fruit-flavored drinks, juice cocktails, vitamin-fortified juice drinks, vitamin waters,and energy drinks in the diets of children and their connection to overweight, obesity, and tooth decay and erosion. The brief discusses the potential consequences of increased consumption of each of the drinks as well as compares the many varieties of milk products. Additional topics include the power of marketing and access; preventing or reducing sugary drink consumption early in a child's life; and supporting healthier food and beverage choices for children through policy recommendations at the federal and state government levels, cities and counties, and through early childhood education agencies.

Contact: First 5 LA, 750 North Alameda Street, Suite 300, Los Angeles, CA 90012, Telephone: (213) 482-5902 Fax: (213) 482-5903 E-mail: http://www.first5la.org/About-Us/Contact Web Site: http://www.first5la.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood caries, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Sugar, Young children

Gortmaker S, Long M, Wang YC. 2009. The negative impact of sugar-sweetened beverages on children's health. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Healthy Eating Research, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report examines research studies on the health impacts of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption; presents initial conclusions based on these studies; and identifies areas for additional research. The report includes a definition of the term, sugar sweetened beverages; describes the connection between SSB consumption and Type 2 diabetes; and discusses children's and adolescents' access to SSBs. Tables indicate trends in children's and adolescent' consumption of SSBs.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Beverages, Child health, Child nutrition, Diabetes mellitus, Research, Sugar, Trends

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.