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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 13 (13 total).

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2016. Facing addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s report on alcohol, drugs, and health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, multiple items.

Annotation: This report reviews what is known about substance misuse and how that knowledge can be used to address substance misuse and related consequences. Contents include information and findings related to neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, and health care systems. The report concludes with a vision for the future including five general messages and their implications for policy and practice, and recommendations for specific stakeholder groups. Supplementary materials such as fact sheets on specific findings and recommendations for different audiences and a toolkit for promoting the report are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Medical treatment, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Substance abusers, Substance dependence, Substance use behavior, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2015. Prenatal drug use and newborn health: Federal efforts need better planning and coordination. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office,

Annotation: This report provides information on how federal agencies have addressed opioid use by pregnant women and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Topics include federally funded research, federal programs, and other federal agency efforts related to prenatal opioid use or NAS; gaps identified by federal agency officials and experts in efforts to address prenatal opioid use or NAS; and how federal efforts to address prenatal opioid use or NAS are planned and coordinated.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Federal agencies, Infant health, Newborn infants, Prenatal influences, Prevention, Program coordination, Program development, Program planning, Referrals, Research, Screening, Substance use

Orange County Health Department. 2015. Betel nut provider guide: The importance of screening for betel (areca) nut. Hillsborough, NC: Orange County Health Department, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document for health care professionals provides guidance on screening for betel (areca) nut use. Topics include what betel nut is and how it used, who is likely to chew betel nut, how to tell if someone chews betel nut, and why it is important to talk to patients about betel nut. Additional topics include adverse health effects of betel nut use for oral health and pregnancy outcomes, and what health professionals can do. Sample screening questions are included.

Contact: Orange County Health Department, P.O. Box 8181, Hillsborough, NC 27278, Telephone: (919) 732-8181 Web Site: http://www.orangecountync.gov/departments/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Communication, Culturally competent services, Drug effects, Nicotine, Oral health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Risk factors, Smokeless tobacco, Substance use screening, Tobacco use

Ramakrishnan M. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: How states can help advance the knowledge base for primary prevention and best practices of care. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report describes opportunities to avert or ameliorate the outcome of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) along a continuum of care spanning timeframes in the mother's and infant's life and the role of state health agencies. Topics include surveillance for NAS-affected infants and the sources of maternal opiate use; reimbursement for using screening protocols to detect substance abuse early in pregnancy and withdrawal signs in newborns; development of measures to ensure follow-up with opioid-dependent women and receipt of comprehensive services; and collaborative efforts to strengthen clinical standards for identification, management, and follow-up with NAS-affected infants and their families. A state index of resources is included.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Intervention, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal addiction, Newborn infants, Opiates, Population surveillance, Primary prevention, Screening, State health agencies, Substance use

Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange. 2013. Guidelines for testing and reporting drug exposed newborns in Washington state. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to hospitals, health care providers and affiliated professionals about maternal drug screening, laboratory testing, and reporting of drug-exposed newborns delivered in Washington State. Contents include indicators for testing, hospital policy, newborn and maternal risk indicators, consent issues for testing, newborn drug testing, management of a newborn with positive drug toxicology, and reporting to Children's Administration. Appendices include references and resources, guidelines for obtaining consent, a sample letter, neonatal abstinence syndrome scoring system, and information on Washington's Children's Administration prenatal substance abuse policy.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Guidelines, Hospital services, Infant health, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, State initiatives, State social service agencies, Substance abusing pregnant women, Substance use screening, Washington

ICF International. 2009. Protecting children in families affected by substance use disorders. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 105 pp. (Child abuse and neglect use manual series)

Annotation: This manual, intended for use by child protective services caseworkers to identify when drug and alcohol use by a parent or other caregiver is a factor in child welfare cases, describes (1) parental substance use disorder and its relationship to child maltreatment, (2) the role of child protective services when substance use disorders are identified, (3) treatment providers, and (4) methods to enhance collaboration with drug and alcohol abuse treatment agencies. Appendices include definitions of terms, information resources for professionals, and tools.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Resources for professionals, Child health, Child protective services, Manuals, Parents, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

FASD Regional Training Centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. [2008]. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Competency-based curriculum development guide for medical and allied health education and practice. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ca. 280 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This purpose of this curriculum development guide is to enhance the knowledge and skills of health care providers to recognize and prevent fetal alcohol spectrum (FAS) disorders by aiding in the development of educational programs and materials. The guide is organized by three types of learning outcomes: competencies, learning goals, and learning objectives, allowing educators or trainers to select goals and objectives appropriate for participants' learning needs and skill levels, along with university or organization criteria. Chapter contents include seven competency topics: foundation; screening and brief interventions; models of addiction; biological effects of alcohol on the fetus; screening, diagnosis, and assessment of FAS; treatment across the lifespan for persons with FASDs; and ethical, legal, and policy issues.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, CD-ROMs, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prenatal addiction, Prenatal care, Professional education, Resources for professionals, Screening, Substance abusing pregnant women

Fogerty S, Finkelstein N. 2006. Alcohol Screening Assessment in Pregnancy (ASAP2) Project: Final report. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, 334 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This report focuses on the Alcohol Screening Assessment in Pregnancy (ASAP2) project during the period October 1,2002, through September 30, 2005.The purpose of this project was to build on the success of the original Massachusetts ASAP Project (ASAP1) by addressing lessons learned and expanding the project to include two additional screening times during pregnancy, futher development of brief intervention protocols and tools, and patient follow-up procedures. The report , which includes an abstract, is divided into the following sections: (1) purpose of the project, (2) goals and objectives, (3) methodology, (4) evaluation, (5) results and outcomes, (6) publications and products, (7) dissemination and utilization of results, (8) future plans and follow-up, and (9) type and amount of support and resources needed to replicate. References are included. The report includes seven appendices, which encompass a pregnancy questionnaire written in several languages, screening questions, flow charts, a screening tool, marketing materials, a list of ASAP2 providers, and evaluation materials. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Assessment, Final reports, Intervention, Massachusetts, Pregnant women, Screening, Substance abuse

Grisso T, Underwood LA. 2004. Screening and assessing mental health and substance use disorders among youth in the juvenile justice system: A resource guide for practitioners. [Delmar, NY]: National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice, 90 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide is designed to provide clinicians and other professionals working with youth in the juvenile justice system with a range of best practice information that will help them more effectively identify youth with mental disorders, thus ultimately improving treatment for these youth. The guide reviews and synthesizes information about the most effective instruments for screening for and assessing mental disorders and substance use disorders among youth at various points in the juvenile justice system. Examples of a variety of models and approaches that have been developed to implement the tools are provided. Final comments, recommendations, and references are included.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice , Policy Research Associates, 345 Delaware Avenue, Delmar, NY 12054, Telephone: (518) 439-7415 Secondary Telephone: (866) 962-6455 E-mail: ncmhjj@prainc.com Web Site: http://www.ncmhjj.com/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assessment, Juvenile justice, Mental disorders, Mental health, Models, Resource materials, Screening, Substance use disorders, Treatment, Young adults, Youth

U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. 1999. Screening and assessing adolescents for substance use disorders. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 136 pp. (Treatment improvement protocol (TIP) series; 31)

Annotation: This report is a companion report of Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 32, one of a series of best practices guidelines to help treatment providers design and deliver better services to adolescent clients with substance abuse disorders. The report concentrates on the strategies, procedures, and instruments that are appropriate for the initial detection of substance use in adolescents, the comprehensive assessment of their problems, and subsequent treatment planning. Sections include the executive summary and recommendations; an introduction to the terms, models, and assessment instruments used in the report; preliminary screening of adolescents; comprehensive assessment for referral and treatment; legal issues; and screening and assessment in juvenile justice settings. The appendices include a bibliography; an extensive selection of screening instrument summaries, both general and comprehensive, and instruments for general functioning domains; drug identification and testing in the juvenile justice system; and a list of field reviewers.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (SMA) 99-3344.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Assessment, Health personnel, High risk adolescents, Program descriptions, Protocols, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusers, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening, Treatment outcome

U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. 1999. Treatment of adolescents with substance use disorders. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 126 pp. (Treatment improvement protocol (TIP) series; 32)

Annotation: This report provides a revision and update of Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 4, published in 1993 in a series of best practices guidelines to help treatment providers design and deliver better services to adolescent clients with substance abuse disorders. Chapter topics include: substance use among adolescents; tailoring treatment to the adolescent's problem; general program characteristics; twelve-step based program; therapeutic communities; family therapy; youth with distinctive treatment needs; and legal and ethical issues. Three appendices are also included: (1) bibliography; (2) medical management of drug intoxication and withdrawal; and (3) field reviewers. Program information and statistics are provided in figures throughout the report.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (SMA) 99-3345.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Ethics, Family therapy, Health personnel, High risk adolescents, Legal issues, Mental health, Program descriptions, Protocols, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusers, Substance use screening, Substance withdrawal syndrome, Therapeutic programs

Morse B, Gehshan S, Hutchins E. 1997. Screening for substance abuse during pregnancy: Improving care, improving health. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 14 pp.

Annotation: This manual discusses the problem and prevalence of substance abuse during pregnancy, and describes how a practitioner can use screening tools for detection and to open a dialog with the patient. It gives suggestions on counseling or referral. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Pregnancy, Pregnancy counseling, Prenatal care, Prenatal screening, Referrals, Screening tests, Substance abuse, Substance use screening

Project on Classification of Exceptional Children. 1974. The futures of children: Categories, labels, and their consequences. Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt University, 309 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the findings of the Project on Classification of Exceptional Children undertaken in 1972 at the request of Elliot Richardson, then secretary of Health, Education and Welfare. It deals with social functions of categories and labels, diagnostic categories, proposed model for classifying children, possible negative effects of treatment programs, the legal status, integration of services for exceptional children, and recommendations. The report ends with 2 appendices: one on suggestions for parents and professionals and the other a list of project participants, grouped by their specialties; and a list of references.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Civil rights, Classification, Developmental disabilities, Diagnostic tests, Family support services, Health screening, Labeling, Substance use screening

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.