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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. [2020]. The case for integrated behavioral health care for mothers, children, and adolescents. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes treatment gaps experienced by women and children with substance abuse or mental disorders, benefits of integrated behavioral health care, and services provided in primary care settings to address these gaps, including Health Resources and Services Administration-funded Pediatric Mental Health Care Access (PMHCA) and Screening ad Treatment for Maternal Depression and Related Behavioral Disorders (MDRBD) programs. The fact sheet gives examples from HRSA awardees in Missouri, Rhode Island, Louisiana, and Kansas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Children, Mental disorders, Model programs, State initiatives, Substance use disorders, Women

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Office of Behavioral Health Equity and Chau V. 2020. The opioid crisis and the Hispanic/Latino population: An urgent issue. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 27 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief addresses contextual issues related to opioid misuse and opioid use disorder in Hispanic/Latino communities, including national data, pain management, and sociocultural factors associated with accessing services, and strategies to address these problems.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SAMHSA PEP20-05-02-002.

Keywords: Access to health care, Hispanic Americans, Opiates, Substance abuse, Substance use disorders, Treatment

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018. Clinical guidance for treating pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder and their infants. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 159 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides guidance for the optimal management of pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder (OUD) and their infants, based on recommendations of experts as of 2017. The guide is designed to help health professionals and women determine the most clinically appropriate action for a particular circumstance. In addition to offering background information, the guide includes fact sheets divided into the following sections: prenatal care, infant care, and maternal postnatal care. Each fact sheet includes a clinical scenario, clinical action steps, supporting evidence and clinical considerations, and links to and descriptions of online resources on the topic.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: (SMA) 18-5054. .

Keywords: Narcotics, Parents, Guidelines, Perinatal addiction, Pregnant women, Prenatal addiction, Substance dependence, Substance use disorders, Treatment

Ko HY, Patrick SW, Tong VT, Patel R, Lind JN, Barfield WD. 2016. Incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome: 28 states, 1999–2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(31):799–802,

Annotation: This report examines state trends in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) incidence using all-payer, hospital inpatient delivery discharges compiled in the State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) during 1999–2013. The findings underscore the importance of state-based public health programs to prevent unnecessary opioid use and to treat substance use disorders during pregnancy, as well as decrease the incidence of NAS.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Measures, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Pregnant women, State programs, Statistical data, Substance use disorders, Trends

Lechner A, Cavanaugh M, Blyler C. 2016. Addressing trauma in American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes an environmental scan of practices and programs for addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. Contents include a summary of the scan scope and results, trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions, interventions focused on suicide prevention and substance use disorders, parenting interventions for youth and their guardians, aspirational frameworks, and common elements of programs addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs of AI/AN youth. The systematic database search methodology and summaries of interventions and evaluations are also provided.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indian, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parenting, Program evaluation, Protective factors, Substance use disorders, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Trauma care, Youth

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2016. Facing addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s report on alcohol, drugs, and health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, multiple items.

Annotation: This report reviews what is known about substance misuse and how that knowledge can be used to address substance misuse and related consequences. Contents include information and findings related to neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, and health care systems. The report concludes with a vision for the future including five general messages and their implications for policy and practice, and recommendations for specific stakeholder groups. Supplementary materials such as fact sheets on specific findings and recommendations for different audiences and a toolkit for promoting the report are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Medical treatment, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Substance abusers, Substance dependence, Substance use behavior, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

National Institute on Drug Abuse. 2014. Principles of adolescent substance use disorder treatment: A research-based guide. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 35 pp.

Annotation: This guide focuses on adolescent substance use -- including abuse of illicit and prescription drugs, alcohol, and tobacco -- and the special treatment needs for people ages 12-17. Topics include the principles of adolescent substance use disorder treatment, frequently asked questions, treatment settings, and evidence-based approaches to treating adolescent substance use disorders (behavioral and family-based approaches, addiction medications, and recovery support services). Treatment referral resources are included.

Contact: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5213, MSC 9561, Bethesda, MD 20892-9561, Telephone: (301) 443-1124 Secondary Telephone: Fax: Web Site: http://www.nida.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 14-7953.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evidence based medicine, Referrals, Research, Substance use disorders, Therapeutics, Treatment effectiveness evaluation

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Serious mental health challenges among older adolescents and young adults. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 14 pp. (The CBHSQ report)

Annotation: This report focuses on mental health problems, co-occurring mental health problems and substance use disorder, and mental health service use among older adolescents ages 16-17 and young adults ages 18 to 25. The report provides a snapshot of mental health issues among older adolescents and young adults overall and by key issues for the transition into adulthood such as housing, employment, education, and insurance coverage.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Comorbidity, Health care utilization, Mental health, School to work transition, Substance use disorders, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Mental health surveillance among children--United States, 2005-2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 62(Suppl. 2):1-35,

Annotation: This report describes federal surveillance systems, surveys, and other information systems that measure prevalence of mental disorders and indicators of mental health among children in the United States and highlights selected national prevalence estimates. Topics include mental disorders (attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder, autism spectrum disorders, mood and anxiety disorders), substance use disorders and substance use, and tic disorders (Tourette syndrome). Selected indicators of mental health, including mentally unhealthy days and suicide, are also assessed. Availability of state-based estimates is noted in the surveillance descriptions and tables.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain diseases, Children, Data, Information systems, Mental disorders, Mental health, Population surveillance, Prevalence, Substance use, Surveys

ICF International. 2009. Protecting children in families affected by substance use disorders. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 105 pp. (Child abuse and neglect use manual series)

Annotation: This manual, intended for use by child protective services caseworkers to identify when drug and alcohol use by a parent or other caregiver is a factor in child welfare cases, describes (1) parental substance use disorder and its relationship to child maltreatment, (2) the role of child protective services when substance use disorders are identified, (3) treatment providers, and (4) methods to enhance collaboration with drug and alcohol abuse treatment agencies. Appendices include definitions of terms, information resources for professionals, and tools.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Resources for professionals, Child health, Child protective services, Manuals, Parents, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

Grisso T, Underwood LA. 2004. Screening and assessing mental health and substance use disorders among youth in the juvenile justice system: A resource guide for practitioners. [Delmar, NY]: National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice, 90 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide is designed to provide clinicians and other professionals working with youth in the juvenile justice system with a range of best practice information that will help them more effectively identify youth with mental disorders, thus ultimately improving treatment for these youth. The guide reviews and synthesizes information about the most effective instruments for screening for and assessing mental disorders and substance use disorders among youth at various points in the juvenile justice system. Examples of a variety of models and approaches that have been developed to implement the tools are provided. Final comments, recommendations, and references are included.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health and Juvenile Justice , Policy Research Associates, 345 Delaware Avenue, Delmar, NY 12054, Telephone: (518) 439-7415 Secondary Telephone: (866) 962-6455 E-mail: ncmhjj@prainc.com Web Site: http://www.ncmhjj.com/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assessment, Juvenile justice, Mental disorders, Mental health, Models, Resource materials, Screening, Substance use disorders, Treatment, Young adults, Youth

Gamm L, Hutchison L, Dabney B, Dorsey A, eds. 2003. Rural Healthy People 2010: A companion document to Healthy People 2010—Volume 2. College Station, TX: Southwest Rural Health Research Center, 166 pp.

Annotation: This volume (the second in a three-volume set) presents literature reviews and associated references for the top rural health priority areas identified in Healthy People 2010. The topics covered include access to quality health services; cancer; diabetes; heart disease and stroke; maternal, infant, and child health; mental health and mental disorders; nutrition and overweight; oral health; substance abuse;and tobacco use. Each chapter includes a list of references.

Contact: Southwest Rural Health Research Center, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Department of Health Policy and Management, 1266 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-1266, Telephone: (979) 862-4238 Fax: (979) 458-0656 Web Site: http://sph.tamhsc.edu/srhrc/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Adults, Cancer, Child health, Children, Diabetes mellitus, Health care delivery, Health services, Healthy People 2010, Heart diseases, Infant health, MCH services, Maternal health, Mental disorders, Mental health, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Rural health, Strokes, Substance abuse, Tobacco use

Gay and Lesbian Medical Association. 2001. Healthy People 2010: Companion document for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health. San Francisco, CA: Gay and Lesbian Medical Association, 481 pp.

Annotation: This document contains most of the existing quantitative and qualitative research and information specific to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health in the areas defined and discusses the overall health issues of LGBT people. The document describes barriers LGBT people face and recommends changes that will facilitate success in overcoming them. Topics covered include access to quality health care services, cancer, educational and community-based programs, health communication, HIV/AIDS, immunization and infectious diseases, mental health and mental disorders, nutrition and weight, public health infrastructure, sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, tobacco use, and violence prevention. The document includes five appendices that contain recommendations, acronyms, LGBT definitions, resources, and contributors.

Contact: Gay and Lesbian Medical Association, 459 Fulton Street, Suite 107, San Francisco, CA 94102, Telephone: (415) 255-4547 Fax: (415) 255-4784 E-mail: info@glma.org Web Site: http://www.glma.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Access to health care, Barriers, Cancer, Communicable diseases, Community based services, Community programs, Educational programs, HIV, Health, Healthy People 2010, Homosexuality, Infections, Mental disorders, Mental health, Nutrition, Public health, Research, Sexuality, Sexually transmitted diseases, Substance abuse, Tobacco use, Violence prevention, Weight management

U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. 1999. Screening and assessing adolescents for substance use disorders. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 136 pp. (Treatment improvement protocol (TIP) series; 31)

Annotation: This report is a companion report of Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 32, one of a series of best practices guidelines to help treatment providers design and deliver better services to adolescent clients with substance abuse disorders. The report concentrates on the strategies, procedures, and instruments that are appropriate for the initial detection of substance use in adolescents, the comprehensive assessment of their problems, and subsequent treatment planning. Sections include the executive summary and recommendations; an introduction to the terms, models, and assessment instruments used in the report; preliminary screening of adolescents; comprehensive assessment for referral and treatment; legal issues; and screening and assessment in juvenile justice settings. The appendices include a bibliography; an extensive selection of screening instrument summaries, both general and comprehensive, and instruments for general functioning domains; drug identification and testing in the juvenile justice system; and a list of field reviewers.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS (SMA) 99-3344.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Assessment, Health personnel, High risk adolescents, Program descriptions, Protocols, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusers, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening, Treatment outcome

McCoy K, Wibbelsman C. 1992. The new teenage body book. East Rutherford, NJ: Putnam Publishing Group, 286 pp.

Annotation: This book was written for adolescents to provide answers to questions and helps them learn more about their bodies and feelings. Topics include physical and emotional development, health, nutrition, exercise, personal appearance, substance use, relationships, sexuality, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, and parenthood. Appendices provide listing of adolescent clinics in each state, crisis counseling and hotlines, special needs resources, books, and audiotapes and videotapes.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Contraception, Eating disorders, Emotional development, Exercise, Interpersonal relations, Nutrition, Parenting, Physical development, Sexually transmitted diseases, Social development, Substance use

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.