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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (85 total).

Great Expectations/Healthy Start. n.d.. Prenatal education curriculum. New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations/Healthy Start, ca. 150 pp.

Annotation: This study guide consists of a series of brief training sessions on various aspects of prenatal and infant care. Curricula topics include the following: 1) anatomy and physiology of pregnancy; 2) breastfeeding; 3) alcohol, smoking, and drug abuse; 4) personal hygiene; 5) sexually transmitted diseases; 6) contraception/family planning; and 7) domestic violence. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Breastfeeding, Contraception, Curricula, Domestic violence, Educational materials, Great Expectations/New Orleans Healthy Start, Infant care, Infant health, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Prenatal education, Prenatal nutrition, Sexually transmitted diseases, Smoking, Substance dependence, Training materials

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. [2020]. The case for integrated behavioral health care for mothers, children, and adolescents. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes treatment gaps experienced by women and children with substance abuse or mental disorders, benefits of integrated behavioral health care, and services provided in primary care settings to address these gaps, including Health Resources and Services Administration-funded Pediatric Mental Health Care Access (PMHCA) and Screening ad Treatment for Maternal Depression and Related Behavioral Disorders (MDRBD) programs. The fact sheet gives examples from HRSA awardees in Missouri, Rhode Island, Louisiana, and Kansas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Children, Mental disorders, Model programs, State initiatives, Substance use disorders, Women

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Office of Behavioral Health Equity and Chau V. 2020. The opioid crisis and the Hispanic/Latino population: An urgent issue. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 27 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief addresses contextual issues related to opioid misuse and opioid use disorder in Hispanic/Latino communities, including national data, pain management, and sociocultural factors associated with accessing services, and strategies to address these problems.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SAMHSA PEP20-05-02-002.

Keywords: Access to health care, Hispanic Americans, Opiates, Substance abuse, Substance use disorders, Treatment

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2018. Clinical guidance for treating pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder and their infants. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 159 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides guidance for the optimal management of pregnant and parenting women with opioid use disorder (OUD) and their infants, based on recommendations of experts as of 2017. The guide is designed to help health professionals and women determine the most clinically appropriate action for a particular circumstance. In addition to offering background information, the guide includes fact sheets divided into the following sections: prenatal care, infant care, and maternal postnatal care. Each fact sheet includes a clinical scenario, clinical action steps, supporting evidence and clinical considerations, and links to and descriptions of online resources on the topic.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: (SMA) 18-5054. .

Keywords: Narcotics, Parents, Guidelines, Perinatal addiction, Pregnant women, Prenatal addiction, Substance dependence, Substance use disorders, Treatment

Ko HY, Patrick SW, Tong VT, Patel R, Lind JN, Barfield WD. 2016. Incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome: 28 states, 1999–2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(31):799–802,

Annotation: This report examines state trends in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) incidence using all-payer, hospital inpatient delivery discharges compiled in the State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) during 1999–2013. The findings underscore the importance of state-based public health programs to prevent unnecessary opioid use and to treat substance use disorders during pregnancy, as well as decrease the incidence of NAS.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Measures, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Pregnant women, State programs, Statistical data, Substance use disorders, Trends

Lechner A, Cavanaugh M, Blyler C. 2016. Addressing trauma in American Indian and Alaska Native youth. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes an environmental scan of practices and programs for addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. Contents include a summary of the scan scope and results, trauma-informed care and trauma-specific interventions, interventions focused on suicide prevention and substance use disorders, parenting interventions for youth and their guardians, aspirational frameworks, and common elements of programs addressing trauma and related behavioral health needs of AI/AN youth. The systematic database search methodology and summaries of interventions and evaluations are also provided.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indian, Intervention, Mental health, Model programs, Parenting, Program evaluation, Protective factors, Substance use disorders, Suicide prevention, Trauma, Trauma care, Youth

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2016. Facing addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s report on alcohol, drugs, and health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, multiple items.

Annotation: This report reviews what is known about substance misuse and how that knowledge can be used to address substance misuse and related consequences. Contents include information and findings related to neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, and health care systems. The report concludes with a vision for the future including five general messages and their implications for policy and practice, and recommendations for specific stakeholder groups. Supplementary materials such as fact sheets on specific findings and recommendations for different audiences and a toolkit for promoting the report are also available.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Medical treatment, Policy development, Public private partnerships, Substance abusers, Substance dependence, Substance use behavior, Substance use disorders, Substance use screening

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

American College of Nurse-Midwives and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2015]. Alcohol and pregnancy: Tips on why and how to stop drinking. Silver Spring, MD: American College of Nurse-Midwives, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource for pregnant women provides information about drinking alcohol during pregnancy and the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome disorders (FASDs). Topics include some of the behavioral and intellectual disabilities of people with FASDs, what women can do to help themselves stop drinking alcohol, and related organizational resources.

Contact: American College of Nurse-Midwives, 8403 Colesville Road, Suite 1550, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-1800 Secondary Telephone: (888) MID-WIFE (643-9433) Fax: (240) 485-1818 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.midwife.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Educational materials, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Pregnant women, Prevention, Substance use

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2015. Prenatal drug use and newborn health: Federal efforts need better planning and coordination. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office,

Annotation: This report provides information on how federal agencies have addressed opioid use by pregnant women and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Topics include federally funded research, federal programs, and other federal agency efforts related to prenatal opioid use or NAS; gaps identified by federal agency officials and experts in efforts to address prenatal opioid use or NAS; and how federal efforts to address prenatal opioid use or NAS are planned and coordinated.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Analgesic drugs, Federal agencies, Infant health, Newborn infants, Prenatal influences, Prevention, Program coordination, Program development, Program planning, Referrals, Research, Screening, Substance use

Bolin JN, Bellamy G, Ferdinand AO, Kash B, Helduser, eds. 2015. Rural Healthy People 2020: A companion document to Healthy People 2020–Volume one. College Station, TX: Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Rural Public Health, Southwest Rural Health Research Center, 135 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a guide and benchmark on the current state of rural health priorities and disparities and serves as a roadmap for updating federal and state leaders on rural health priorities identified through the national Rural Healthy People 2020 survey. Volume one addresses each of the ten top-ranked rural health priorities and includes reviews of relevant literature, updated for those topics previously identified as priorities in Rural Healthy People 2010, and models for practice that rural practitioners can use to support community and regional programs. Topics include access to quality health services, nutrition and weight status, the burden of diabetes, mental health and mental disorders, substance abuse trends, heart disease and stroke, physical activity, older adults, updates and challenges in maternal and child health, and tobacco use in rural America.

Contact: Southwest Rural Health Research Center, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Department of Health Policy and Management, 1266 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-1266, Telephone: (979) 862-4238 Fax: (979) 458-0656 Web Site: http://sph.tamhsc.edu/srhrc/index.html Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-4951-5242-9.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child health, Community health services, Diabetes, Health care disparities, Health objectives, Health promotion, Healthy People 2020, Heart diseases, Literature reviews, Maternal health, Mental health, National initiatives, Nutrition, Physical activity, Rural populations, Strokes, Substance abuse, Tobacco use

National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2015. Reducing neonatal abstinence syndrome in Tennessee. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Women, children & adolescents)

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights partnerships to address the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) epidemic in Tennessee. Topics include efforts to expand a community-based program to assist mothers with substance abuse problems and ensure a drug-free and safe home for their newborns; provide start-up costs for a regional detox center for women addicted to prescription drugs; research the effectiveness of detox from opiate drugs during pregnancy, and the long-term effect of detox treatment on NAS rates in the state; and establish a hospital-based NAS treatment process.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug addiction, Drug use during pregnancy, Financing, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Newborn infants, Opiates, Postpartum care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention program, State initiatives, Substance abuse treatment, Tennessee

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

Clifford S, Austin C. 2015. Betel nut. Hillsborough, NC: Orange County Health Department, 1 p.

Annotation: This handout provides information about the potentially harmful effects of chewing betel nut, including increased risk for cancer and gum disease. The handout addresses risk associated with combining betel nut and tobacco and risks for chewing betel nut for pregnant women and children. The handout also includes information about the importance of talking with a doctor and dentist about betel nut use and early cancer detection and provides phone numbers for information about oral health care in North Carolina. The handout is available in English, Burmese, and Karen.

Contact: Orange County Health Department, P.O. Box 8181, Hillsborough, NC 27278, Telephone: (919) 732-8181 Contact Phone: (919) 245-2387 Contact E-mail: sclifford@orangecountync.gov Web Site: http://www.orangecountync.gov/departments/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Cancer, Children, Early intervention, Gingivitis, Non English language materials, North Carolina, Oral health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Risk factors, Substance use, Tobacco use

Orange County Health Department. 2015. Betel nut provider guide: The importance of screening for betel (areca) nut. Hillsborough, NC: Orange County Health Department, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document for health care professionals provides guidance on screening for betel (areca) nut use. Topics include what betel nut is and how it used, who is likely to chew betel nut, how to tell if someone chews betel nut, and why it is important to talk to patients about betel nut. Additional topics include adverse health effects of betel nut use for oral health and pregnancy outcomes, and what health professionals can do. Sample screening questions are included.

Contact: Orange County Health Department, P.O. Box 8181, Hillsborough, NC 27278, Telephone: (919) 732-8181 Web Site: http://www.orangecountync.gov/departments/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Communication, Culturally competent services, Drug effects, Nicotine, Oral health, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Risk factors, Smokeless tobacco, Substance use screening, Tobacco use

Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. 2014. Public health learning modules: Using Healthy People 2020 to improve population health. Washington, DC: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, 18 modules.

Annotation: These learning modules aim to encourage the use of Healthy People 2020 in health professions education. They describe current policy and program efforts that address Healthy People 2020 topic areas and explain how to use available data to evaluate progress towards Healthy People 2020 goals and objectives. The modules include lecture materials, class activities, supplemental learning resources, and additional tools for instructors. They cover such topics as the legal infrastructure of public health, social determinants of health, emergencies, tobacco and substance use, mental health, access to health services, healthcare associated infections, health information technology, obesity and access to food, teen drivers, using policy and best practices in MCH, providing services to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population, oral health, public health infrastructure, and environmental health.

Contact: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, 1001 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 610, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 463-0550 Secondary Telephone: (866) 474-APTR (474-2787) Fax: (202) 463-0555 E-mail: info@aptrweb.org Web Site: http://www.aptrweb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Emergencies, Environmental health, Health services delivery, Healthy People 2020, Infections, Legal issues, Mental health, Model programs, Motor vehicle safety, Oral health, Professional education, Program evaluation, Public health infrastructure, Social factors, Substance use behavior, Tobacco use, Training materials

National Institute on Drug Abuse. 2014. Principles of adolescent substance use disorder treatment: A research-based guide. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 35 pp.

Annotation: This guide focuses on adolescent substance use -- including abuse of illicit and prescription drugs, alcohol, and tobacco -- and the special treatment needs for people ages 12-17. Topics include the principles of adolescent substance use disorder treatment, frequently asked questions, treatment settings, and evidence-based approaches to treating adolescent substance use disorders (behavioral and family-based approaches, addiction medications, and recovery support services). Treatment referral resources are included.

Contact: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5213, MSC 9561, Bethesda, MD 20892-9561, Telephone: (301) 443-1124 Secondary Telephone: Fax: Web Site: http://www.nida.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 14-7953.

Keywords: Adolescents, Evidence based medicine, Referrals, Research, Substance use disorders, Therapeutics, Treatment effectiveness evaluation

Ramakrishnan M. 2014. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: How states can help advance the knowledge base for primary prevention and best practices of care. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report describes opportunities to avert or ameliorate the outcome of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) along a continuum of care spanning timeframes in the mother's and infant's life and the role of state health agencies. Topics include surveillance for NAS-affected infants and the sources of maternal opiate use; reimbursement for using screening protocols to detect substance abuse early in pregnancy and withdrawal signs in newborns; development of measures to ensure follow-up with opioid-dependent women and receipt of comprehensive services; and collaborative efforts to strengthen clinical standards for identification, management, and follow-up with NAS-affected infants and their families. A state index of resources is included.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comprehensive health care, Intervention, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal addiction, Newborn infants, Opiates, Population surveillance, Primary prevention, Screening, State health agencies, Substance use

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Drug use, illicit: Primary care interventions for children and adolescents. Rockville, MD: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, multiple items.

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2014. Serious mental health challenges among older adolescents and young adults. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 14 pp. (The CBHSQ report)

Annotation: This report focuses on mental health problems, co-occurring mental health problems and substance use disorder, and mental health service use among older adolescents ages 16-17 and young adults ages 18 to 25. The report provides a snapshot of mental health issues among older adolescents and young adults overall and by key issues for the transition into adulthood such as housing, employment, education, and insurance coverage.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Comorbidity, Health care utilization, Mental health, School to work transition, Substance use disorders, Transition to independent living, Young adults

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.