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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Wisdom JP, Pollock MN, Hopping-Winn A. 2011. Service engagement and retention for women with substance use disorders. Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, 12 pp. (Research to practice brief)

Annotation: This practice brief, which is geared toward practitioners who work with pregnant and parenting women who abuse substances, outlines specific engagement and retention strategies to decrease noncompliance and increase participation among this population. Topics include (1) client barriers and service barriers to engagement and retention and (2) tactics for assessing and addressing agency barriers.

Contact: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, Center for Child & Youth Policy , University of California, Berkeley, 1950 Addison Street, Suite 104, , Berkeley, CA 94720-7402, Telephone: (510) 643-8390 Fax: (510) 643-7019 E-mail: aia@berkeley.edu Web Site: http://aia.berkeley.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Mothers, Pregnant women, Programs, Social services, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abusing pregnant women

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Substance use during pregnancy: 2002 and 2003 update. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 3 pp. (NSDUH report)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health on illicit drug use among pregnant and nonpregnant women ages 15 to 44. The fact sheet, which includes results in brief, also discusses illicit drug use, alcohol use, cigarette use, and substance use during the year after giving birth. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Endnotes are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Room 7-1044, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1212 Web Site: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption behavior, Illicit drugs, MCH research, Postpartum women, Smoking, Substance abuse, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Substance use behavior, Surveys, Women's health

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies. 2005. Mother's serious mental illness and substance use among youths. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 5 pp. (NSDUH report)

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses results from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health on the association between substance use among youth and mothers' serious mental illness (SMI). the fact sheet, which includes results in brief, also discusses SMI and substance abuse among mothers, and substance abuse among youths living with a mother who had SMI or substance use. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the fact sheet. Endnotes are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Office of Applied Studies, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Room 7-1044, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-1212 Web Site: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, MCH research, Mental disorders, Mothers, Substance abuse, Substance abusing mothers, Surveys, Youth

Cawthon L. 2004. First Steps database: Safe babies, safe moms. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis, 8 pp. (Fact sheet no. 4.36f)

Annotation: This brief summarizes the Washington state program Safe Babies, Safe Moms (formerly the Comprehensive Program Evaluation Project, or CPEP) implemented to improve the health and welfare of substance abusing mothers and their young children and provides an update to the October 2003 evaluation report with additional outcome measures and longer periods of follow-up. Measures tracked include demonstrated behavior change in the use of more effective family planning methods, reduced levels of parenting stress, decreased arrest rates, a reduction in low birth weight infants for those pregnant women enrolled in the program before delivery, decreased accepted referrals for child abuse or neglect for mothers enrolled before delivery, and higher employment rates for non-substance abusing Medicaid women than substance abusers.

Contact: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, P.O. Box 45204, Olympia, WA 98504-5204, Telephone: (360) 902-0707 Fax: (360) 902-0705 E-mail: ellswnm@dshs.wa.gov Web Site: http://www.dshs.wa.gov/rda Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Drug affected infants, High risk mothers, Housing programs, Program evaluation, State programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Surveys, Washington, Young children

Mattison DR, Wilson S, Coussens C, Gilbert D, eds.; Board on Health Sciences Policy, Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. 2003. The role of environmental hazards in premature birth: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 127 pp.

Annotation: This book summarizes a workshop convened on October 2-3, 2001, to look at issues surrounding the impact of environmental exposure on the fetus in the uterus, risks of premature birth, as well as child health and well-being throughout life. In addition the role of social and behavioral factors such as stress, anxiety, depression, drug use, alcohol use, and tobacco smoking is discussed. Chapters include: (1) preterm birth and its consequences, (2) labor and delivery, (3) preterm birth and a brief summary of biological pathways, (4) preterm birth and gene-environment interactions, (5) the social implications of preterm birth, and (6) future directions for research. The book also contains abstracts of 18 relevant articles and references. Three appendices contain the workshop agenda, a list of speakers and panelists, and a list of workshop participants.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09065-2.

Keywords: Childbirth, Conferences, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Genes, Labor, Maternal fetal exchange, Maternal health, Maternal mental health, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Research, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

Cawthon L, Westra K. 2003. Safe babies, safe moms: Program evaluation. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis, 72 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the evaluation of the Washington state program Safe Babies, Safe Moms (formerly the Comprehensive Program Evaluation Project, or CPEP) to: (1) develop and implement comprehensive programs for alcohol- and drug-abusing women and their young children, (2) increase the availability of chemical dependency treatment, (3) implement new services called Targeted Intensive Case Management, and (4) enhance housing support services. Report contents include a summary and introduction to the need for the program and its services, client needs and services provided, a program description, methods used for the evaluation, and findings. Survey results and findings are summarized in charts and tables throughout the report and a bibliography is included.

Contact: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, P.O. Box 45204, Olympia, WA 98504-5204, Telephone: (360) 902-0707 Fax: (360) 902-0705 E-mail: ellswnm@dshs.wa.gov Web Site: http://www.dshs.wa.gov/rda Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Drug affected infants, High risk mothers, Housing programs, Program evaluation, State programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Surveys, Washington, Young children

Farmer Y, Cawthon L, Lindsay J. 2001. Comprehensive program evaluation project: Program development and implementation. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, 73 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on process evaluation of a comprehensive program in Washington state that seeks to improve the health and welfare of substance-abusing mothers and their children by early identification of pregnant substance abusers, improved access to and coordination of health care services and chemical dependency treatment, and family-focused early intervention services for mothers and their children. The purpose of the report is to describe practices that are demonstrated to be effective and to identify challenges faced during program implementation. Client characteristics, service utilization, and outcome data are also included where available. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following sections: (1) methods, (2) pilot site descriptions, (3) findings, (4) discussion, (5) conclusion, (6) bibliography, and (7) appendices. Eleven appendices include pilot site description data sources, a pilot eligibility inquiry form, and other relevant information and forms.

Contact: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Research and Data Analysis Division, P.O. Box 45204, Olympia, WA 98504-5204, Telephone: (360) 902-0707 Fax: (360) 902-0705 E-mail: ellswnm@dshs.wa.gov Web Site: http://www.dshs.wa.gov/rda Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Early intervention, Families, Health care services, Maternal health, Pilot projects, Service coordination, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women, Treatment, Washington

Brooks CS, Rice KF. 1997. Families in recovery: Coming full circle. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, 333 p.

Annotation: This book discusses the effects of substance abuse on the family of the chemically dependent person and how it affects the family's functioning. It considers the incidence of substance abuse, how addictions affects child development, and why the predisposition to substance abuse can become cyclical. It also examines special topics such as exposure to substances in utero and HIV and the effects of violence and trauma. It then introduces a family-centered treatment model that helps substance abusers recover from their addiction.

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-264-9.

Keywords: Children, Children of alcoholics, Drug use during pregnancy, Family centered care, Family relations, Recovering addicts, Recovering alcoholics, Rehabilitation, Substance abuse treatment programs, Substance abusing mothers

Brady C. 1996 (ca.). Substance abusing women: The ultimate home visiting challenge—A report on the University of Florida MIC Project Resource Mothers Program. Gainesville, FL: University of Florida, Maternity and Infant Care Project, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the history of the first 5 years of the Maternity and Infant Care Resource Mothers Project at the University of Florida. The project was developed as part of a prenatal care delivery system that provides services in several counties. The project offers family-centered, community-based services through paraprofessional home visitors working with preconceptional, pregnant, and postpartum substance-using women. The report provides an overview of the area served; describes the components of the program, the resource mothers, the women served, the results to date, and program costs and benefits; and summarizes the lessons learned. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Florida, Maternity and Infant Care Project, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 15 South East First Avenue, Suite A, Gainesville, FL 32601, Telephone: (904) 392-4491 Contact Phone: (352) 392-4491 $5.00.

Keywords: Community based services, Drug affected infants, Family centered services, Home visiting, Infant health, Maternal health, Outreach, Perinatal care, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 1996. From the source: A guide for implementing perinatal addiction prevention and treatment programs. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 196 pp. (CSAP implementation guide)

Annotation: This guide describes how to design, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive prevention and treatment program for women involved in or in danger of perinatal substance abuse. It is based on experiences of the CSAP Pregnant and Post-partum Women and their Infants (PPWI) demonstration projects. Aimed at teachers, community health workers, and doctors, the guide discusses the mechanics of implementing the program and dealing with clients, not the content of counseling sessions. It includes many references, resource lists, brief guides, and reproducible forms.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Drug use during pregnancy, High risk populations, Infants, Mothers, Pregnancy outcome, Program budgeting, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning, Smoking during pregnancy, Substance abusing pregnant women, Women

Wetherington CL, Smeriglio VL, Finnegan LP, eds. 1996. Behavioral studies of drug-exposed offspring: Methodological issues in human and animal research. Rockville, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 297 pp. (National Institute on Drug Abuse Research monograph series; no. 164)

Annotation: This research monograph is based upon revisions of presentations made at a technical review held by the National Institute on Drug Abuse at which researchers reviewed the state of the art regarding behavioral assessments of offspring prenatally exposed to abused drugs. The fundamental aim of the monograph is to clarify the methodological issues for future research in this field, to provide caution in the interpretation of research findings, and to suggest future research directions.

Contact: National Institute on Drug Abuse, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 5213, MSC 9561, Bethesda, MD 20892-9561, Telephone: (301) 443-1124 Secondary Telephone: Fax: Web Site: http://www.nida.nih.gov Available in libraries. Document Number: NIH 96-4105.

Keywords: Behavior, Drug affected children, Drug affected infants, Drug use during pregnancy, Research, Research methodology, Substance abusing mothers

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1993-. Prevention of perinatal substance use: Pregnant and Postpartum Women and Their Infants Demonstration Grant Program: Abstracts of active projects, FY 19__. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, annual.

Annotation: This directory describes all 147 demonstration grant projects funded under the Pregnant and Postpartum Women and Their Infants initiative. This program focuses on the development of innovative, community-based models of drug prevention, education, and/or treatment. Most of the projects also provide direct services such as case management, parenting classes, and referrals to drug and alcohol programs. Many of these model programs have developed outreach strategies and community networks of providers. Numerous projects are also involved in training providers and offering prevention education at the community level. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHG031.

Keywords: Directories, Government financing, Model programs, Prevention programs, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

Soman LA, Dunn-Malhotra E, Halfon N. 1993. Perinatal alcohol and drug use: Access to essential services in 12 California counties. Berkeley, CA: California Policy Seminar, 138 pp. (California Policy Seminar research report; CPS brief. 5(6). March 1993)

Annotation: This report and the accompanying brief describe a research project aimed at gathering information on the services available in California for chemically dependent pregnant and parenting women and young drug-exposed children. The project consisted of a literature review and the development of a comprehensive model of care for the target population that reflects consensus among a statewide panel of experts. Surveys were also conducted to identify and assess state and federally funded programs that provide a range of health and social services to a population that might include chemically dependent pregnant and postpartum women and drug-exposed children from birth to age three.

Contact: California Policy Research Center, 1950 Addison Street #203, Berkeley, CA 94720-7410, Telephone: (510) 642-5514 Fax: (510) 642-8793 E-mail: cprc@ucop.edu The CPS brief is available at no charge; the complete report is available at no charge to state government offices and for $12.00 to all others.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, California, Drug affected infants, Perinatal health, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

Magrab PR, Doherty DM, eds. 1991. Mothers, infants and substance abuse: Proceedings of the American Psychological Association - Division 12 Midwinter Meeting. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, Center for Child Health and Mental Health Policy, 139 pp.

Annotation: This publication represents the body of work presented at the symposium, 'Mothers, Infants and Substance Abuse', sponsored by Division 12 of the American Psychological Association and the Center for Child Health and Mental Health Policy in Scottsdale, Arizona on January 19-20, 1991. The symposium covered important issues related to substance exposed infants and their families and specifically addressed the following: the scope of the problem, understanding contributing factors, developmental outcomes, effective intervention strategies, models of family preservation, issues related to adolescent mothers, and developing effective service delivery models.

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Drug affected infants, Mothers, Substance abusers, Substance abusing pregnant women

Morton CJ, Balassone ML, Guendelman SR. 1987. Preventing low birthweight and infant mortality: Programmatic issues for public health social workers. Berkeley, CA: University of California, School of Public Health, Maternal and Child Health Program, 238 pp.

Annotation: This book examines the prevention of low birthweight and infant mortality from both the policy and program level. The first section of the publication examines the social and health policy issues relating to adequate income and access to care. The second section focuses on risk assessment as an important tool in prevention. The middle section focuses on program evaluation, beginning with an explanation of differential social program evaluation. The section also presents the methodology being used to evaluate four early intervention programs instituted to reduce child maltreatment among high risk mothers. The last two sections describe service innovations directed to special populations: pregnant women at risk due to behavioral factors, chemically dependent women, those at genetic risk, adolescents, and new immigrants. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Earl Warren Hall School of Public Health, Maternal and Child Health Program, University of California, Berkeley, 50 University Hall Suite 207, Berkeley, CA 94720, Telephone: (510) 642-1512 Fax: (510) 643-6426 E-mail: whussey@berkeley.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Child abuse, Family income, Genetic predisposition, Immigrants, Infant mortality, Low birthweight, Mothers, Prevention, Risk assessment, Substance abusing mothers

Rodman D, Murphy A, eds. 1985. Proceedings: Perinatal Care In The 80's: Social Work Strategies for Prevention and Intervention. Waltham, MA: Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center, University Affiliated Training Program, 134 pp.

Annotation: The papers presented in these proceedings reflect areas of knowledge and practice which are applicable to the delivery of services to mothers and children, adolescents, and family units. Topics covered are comprehensive health planning in perinatal care; understanding principles of genetics; role of social work in genetics; substance abuse (alcohol, drugs, and tobacco); staff reflections on caring for drug addicted pregnant women; ethno/cultural factors and perinatal care; integration of Southeast Asians into a health care system; identification of mothers with medical and social risks; access to the health system for mothers and infants at risk; nutrition, psychosocial and medical aspects; and maternal phenylketonuria as a disease born of success.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Access to prenatal care, Adolescent health services, Asian Americans, Genetics, Health planning, High risk mothers, MCH services, Maternal phenylketonuria, Perinatal care, Social work, Sociocultural factors, Substance abuse, Substance abusing pregnant women

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.