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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (38 total).

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

Rudd RA, Seth P, Felicita D, Scholl L. 2016. Increases in drug and opioid-involved overdose deaths: United States, 2010–2015. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 65(50–51):1445–1452,

Annotation: This report examines overall drug overdose death rates during 2010-2015 and opioid overdose death rates during 2014–2015 by subcategories (natural/semisynthetic opioids, methadone, heroin, and synthetic opioids other than methadone). Rates are stratified by demographics, region, and by 28 states with high quality reporting on death certificates of specific drugs involved in overdose deaths. Implications for public health practice are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic pain, Collaboration, Drug addiction, Heroin, Illicit drugs, Methadone, Mortality rates, Opiates, Prescription drugs, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment services

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

Children's Safety Network. 2014. Injury prevention: What works?—A summary of cost-outcome analysis for injury prevention programs (2014 update). Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network Economics and Data Analysis Resource Center; Calverton, MD: Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE), 31 pp.

Annotation: This set of fact sheets presents information on methods for conducting cost-outcome analysis for a number of child, adolescent, and adult injury prevention and intervention programs, followed by data and analysis for specific program types. Topics include motor vehicle and pedestrian safety intervention, impaired driving and pedestrian intervention, open-flame and burn prevention, violence prevention, substance abuse intervention, and health services and miscellaneous injury prevention. Data tables, a glossary, and references are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Burn prevention, Children, Cost benefit analysis, Impaired driving, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle safety, Pedestrians, Prevention programs, Preventive health services, Statistics, Substance abuse treatment, Violence prevention

Guttmacher Institute. 2014. Substance abuse during pregnancy. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 2 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about state policies on substance abuse during pregnancy. A chart provides detail on state-by-state definitions of abuse and what guidance is recommended.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, State legislation, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusing pregnant women

U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. 2013. Prevention and early identification of mental health and substance use conditions. Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 12 pp. (CMCS informational bulletin)

Annotation: This information bulletin is intended to inform states about resources available to help them meet the needs of children under the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment Program (EPSDT), specifically with respect to mental health and substance-use-disorder services. The bulletin provides information about mental illness in children and discusses screening, clinical guidelines, professional development and training, clinical quality reporting, and state initiatives.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child mental health, Diagnosis, Intervention, EPSDT, Guidelines, Health services, Initiatives, Mental disorders, Resource materials, Screening, State programs, Substance abuse, Training, Treatment

Truven Health Analytics. 2013. Medicaid handbook: Interface with behavioral health services. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This book reviews Medicaid and its role in financing services and treatment for mental health disorders and substance use disorders. It discusses services included in state Medicaid plans, the role of the provider, reimbursement, the relationship between Medicare and Medicaid, practical guides to Medicaid state plans and waivers, and other factors related to Medicaid.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care financing, Medicaid, Mental health services, Reimbursement, State programs, Substance abuse treatment services

Taylor P, Bailey D, Green SR, McCully C, eds. 2012. Substance abuse during pregnancy: Guidelines for screening (rev. ed.). Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This booklet describes the role of health professionals in screening and identifying pregnant women with substance abuse issues. Contents include guidelines for screening and follow-up, sample screening tools, recommendations related to drug testing of pregnant women and newborns, and referral resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Health Education Resource Exchange, Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47833, Olympia, WA 98504-7833, Telephone: (360) 236-3736 Fax: (360) 664-4500 E-mail: here@doh.wa.gov Web Site: http://here.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, Newborns, Pregnant women, Screening, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment services, Tests

National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center. 2012. Substance use during pregnancy: Prevalence, impact and solutions. Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, 23 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This tutorial presents an overview of the prevalence and nature of substance abuse among pregnant women in the United States and discusses factors that often contribute to substance abuse. It reviews the potential impact of prenatal exposure to various substances on infant development and well-being. The tutorial also examines interventions for the prevention and treatment of substance abuse during pregnancy, from identification and education to individual and family-based services. Interventions proven to promote the safety and well-being of affected newborns, such as family treatment drug courts and father involvement, are also discussed. In addition, the tutorial explores relevant federal and state policies.

Contact: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, Center for Child & Youth Policy , University of California, Berkeley, 1950 Addison Street, Suite 104, , Berkeley, CA 94720-7402, Telephone: (510) 643-8390 Fax: (510) 643-7019 E-mail: aia@berkeley.edu Web Site: http://aia.berkeley.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Education, Family support services, Fathers, Health promotion, Infant development, Infant health, Intervention, Public policy, Risk factors, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abusing pregnant women

Zahnd E, Aydin M, Grant D, Holtby S. 2011. The link between intimate partner violence, substance abuse, and mental health in California. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 8 pp. (Health policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief presents findings on the linkages between intimate partner violence (IPV), emotional health, and substance use among adults ages 18-65 in California. Topics include psychological distress among IPV victims, violence-related substance abuse, and mental health and substance abuse services needs among IPV victims.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Domestic violence, Emotional trauma, Interpersonal violence, Mental health, Mental health services, Public policy, State surveys, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment services, Women's health

National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors. 2011. Therapeutic services for children whose parents receive substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. Washington, DC: National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, 43 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on therapeutic services for children whose parents are in treatment for substance abuse, examines how states have defined therapeutic services for children, what services states offer for children, how a state determines whether and what type of therapeutic services a child should receive, and how states ensure that children have access to such services. In addition to providing background information,the paper discusses federally funded programs and policies, the study methodology, therapeutic services across all states, case studies, and barriers to service.

Contact: National Association of State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Directors, 1025 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 605, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 293-0090 Fax: (202) 293-1250 E-mail: dcoffice@nasadad.org Web Site: http://www.nasadad.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Case studies, Children, Families, Federal programs, Parents, Public policy, Research, Service delivery, Services, State programs, Substance abuse treatment

Wisdom JP, Pollock MN, Hopping-Winn A. 2011. Service engagement and retention for women with substance use disorders. Berkeley, CA: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, 12 pp. (Research to practice brief)

Annotation: This practice brief, which is geared toward practitioners who work with pregnant and parenting women who abuse substances, outlines specific engagement and retention strategies to decrease noncompliance and increase participation among this population. Topics include (1) client barriers and service barriers to engagement and retention and (2) tactics for assessing and addressing agency barriers.

Contact: National Abandoned Infants Assistance Resource Center, Center for Child & Youth Policy , University of California, Berkeley, 1950 Addison Street, Suite 104, , Berkeley, CA 94720-7402, Telephone: (510) 643-8390 Fax: (510) 643-7019 E-mail: aia@berkeley.edu Web Site: http://aia.berkeley.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Mothers, Pregnant women, Programs, Social services, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abusing pregnant women

Colorado Department of Health and Environment, Maternal and Child Health Program. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Statewide needs assessment—Colorado. [Denver, CO]: Colorado Department of Health and Environment, Maternal and Child Health Program, 63 pp.

Annotation: This assessment is Colorado's response to the legislative requirement for receiving FY 2010 Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program funding. This funding is available through the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Grant program, which is part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The program is intended to help states respond to the needs of children and families in communities at risk in order to improve health and developmental outcomes for children through the implementation of evidence-based home visitation programs. Topics include a data report, quality and capacity of existing early childhood home visiting initiatives/programs in the state, and state capacity for providing substance abuse treatment and counseling services to individuals and families in need.

Contact: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive, South, Denver, CO 80246, Telephone: (303) 692-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 886-7689 E-mail: cdphe.information@state.co.us Web Site: https://www.colorado.gov/cdphe Available from the website.

Keywords: Legislation, Access to health care, Child health, Colorado, Counseling, Early childhood development, Family support services, Federal programs, Financing, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Initiatives, Legislation, Low income groups, Needs assessment, Prevention, State grants, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse, Treatment

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2010. Youth substance use interventions: Where do they fit into a school’s mission?. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 52 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the question: Where do interventions for concerns about substance use fit into the work of schools? It begins by providing an overview of the major issues, distinguishing between substance use and abuse and presenting data relevant to substance use and treatment of abuse and dependency. The report examines the determinants of substance problems and looks at interventions beyond basic treatment practices. Acknowledging the complex nature of youth problems, the report outlines the need to fit substance use concerns into efforts to move schools forward in establishing comprehensive, cohesive approaches that can address the wide range of student problems that schools are faced with. It concludes with a discussion of some key implications for school policy and implementation of innovative and evidence-based practices.

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Adolescents, Intervention, Program improvement, School health, School health services, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment, Youth

Texas Department of State Health Services, Division of Family and Community Health Services. 2010. Texas home visiting needs assessment for the Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. [Austin, TX]: Texas Department of State Health Services, Division of Family and Community Health Services, 83 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This needs assessment provides information about home visiting needs in Texas. The document includes background information about the state and discusses the process for conducting the assessment, the statewide and at-risk communities data report, the quality and capacity of existing home visiting initiatives in Texas, partner agency infrastructure for early childhood services, existing home visiting initiatives, and the quality and capacity of existing substance abuse treatment and counseling services in Texas.

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, TX 78756, Telephone: (512) 458-7111 Secondary Telephone: (512) 458-7708 Fax: (512) 458-7750 Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Families, Home visiting, Infant health, Low income groups, Maternal health services, Mental health services, Services, State MCH programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse treatment services, Texas, Needs assessment, Young children

Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program needs assessment. Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, 181 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment report discusses a statewide data report for Missouri, identification of at-risk communities, data reports for each of the top 10 at-risk counties, quality and capacity of existing programs and initiatives for early childhood home visiting, and the state's capacity for providing substance abuse treatment and counseling services.

Contact: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, 1730 East Elm, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570, Telephone: (573) 751-6400 Fax: (573) 751-6041 E-mail: info@dhss.mo.gov Web Site: http://www.dhss.mo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Counseling, Families, Initiatives, Health services, High risk children, High risk infants, Home visiting, Infant health, Missouri, Needs assessment, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse treatment, Women's health

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Family Health Administration. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infants, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Maryland's statewide needs assessment. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Family Health Administration, 25 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This needs-assessment supplemental information report for Maryland provides information about key health indicators in the state, such as infant mortality and related risk factors and child health, and discusses Maryland's plans to build on previous home visiting programs and employ new home visiting strategies. The report describes Maryland's approach to conducting the preliminary home visiting needs assessment to identify communities at risk through analysis of data and assessment of capacity. Topics include the needs assessment process, findings, communities at risk, and capacity for providing substance abuse treatment.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Office of Family and Community Health Services, 201 West Preston Street, Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201-2399, Secondary Telephone: (800) 456-8900 E-mail: https://health.maryland.gov/Pages/contactus.aspx Web Site: http://phpa.dhmh.maryland.gov/mch/Pages/Home.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant death, Infant health, Low income groups, Maryland, Needs assessment, Poverty, State programs, Substance abuse treatment services

Michigan Department of Community Health. 2010. Michigan Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program statewide needs assessment. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Community Health, 34 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This report summarizes findings from a statewide needs assessment in Michigan. Topics include communities with the highest concentration of risk, the quality and capacity of existing programs and initiatives for early childhood home visiting in each of the identified at-risk communities, and state capacity for providing substance abuse treatment and counseling services to individuals and families needing these services who reside in at-risk communities. Contents include information about participating agencies and roles and the indicators used to identify communities with the highest concentration of need. The appendices contain state and community data tables, descriptions of state- or federally-funded home visiting programs in Michigan, and data on the need for substance abuse treatment by county.

Contact: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Capitol View Building, 201 Townsend Street, Lansing, MI 48913, Telephone: (517) 373-3740 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Counseling, Health services delivery, High risk groups, Home visiting, Michigan, Needs assessment, Public health infrastructure, State programs, Substance abuse treatment

Morral AR, McCaffrey DF, Ridgeway G, Mukherji A, Beighley C. 2006. The relative effectiveness of 10 adolescent substance abuse treatment programs in the United States. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is intended for professionals with an interest in substance abuse treatment effectiveness, treatment evaluation methods, and risk or case-mix adjustments, describes a study in which researchers interviewed adolescents treated in 11 adolescent substance abuse treatment programs that had been identified as having suggestive evidence of effectiveness. The purpose of the study was to determine whether the adolescents had better outcomes a year after treatment admission than they would have at other facilities.This report is designed to examine whether there is any evidence of relative treatment effects rather than to suggest that one or another treatment program is superior to others, so does not identify the programs. The report discusses the different adolescent treatment models, the case-mix adjustment approach, the study procedures, case-mix adjusted comparison samples, and outcomes. A discussion section is included. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report, and the report includes an appendix with additional supporting tables. References are included.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org $20.00, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-8330-3916-4; TR-346-CSAT.

Keywords: Adolescents, Program evaluation, Research, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment, Substance abuse treatment services

National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University. 2005. Family matters: Substance abuse and the American family. New York, NY: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 88 pp. (A CASA white paper)

Annotation: This white paper explores the effects of substance abuse on the family unit as a whole and on children in particular, and examines the multiple ways in which the family influences its members, particularly its children, in their own choices about smoking, drinking, and using drugs. It provides concrete recommendations for family members to prevent substance abuse and to intervene when it occurs. Topics covered include (1) substance abuse and the changing American family, (2) health effects of parental substance abuse on the family, (3) substance abuse and family functioning, (4) what parents can do to prevent children's substance abuse, and (5) where to turn for help. The white paper includes one appendix that contains contact information for substance-abuse-related organizations. Endnotes and a bibliography are included.

Contact: National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 633 Third Avenue, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 841-5200 Fax: (212) 956-8020 Web Site: http://www.casacolumbia.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support services, Intervention, Parents, Substance abuse, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment services

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.