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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 10 (10 total).

Danielson C. n.d.. Healthy Foundations [Final report]. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health, 51 pp.

Annotation: The project's goals were to: (1) Develop and implement structures and processes in defined community areas to plan and implement a family-centered, community-based health care delivery system for children; (2) develop data system capacity and function statewide to ensure family-centered, community-based primary care services for children; and (3) share experiences in family-centered, community-based system change in the area of primary health care for children with other State, regional, and national maternal and child health providers. At the State level, strategies were directed toward developing a system of children's primary health care delivery that was family centered and community based. At the local level, child health steering committees in established projects were to continue to plan and implement child health system changes in their service areas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Child Mortality, Community Based Health Services, Databases, Family Centered Health Care, Information Systems, Primary Care, Standards of Care, State Programs

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health. 2016. Summary of infection prevention practices in dental settings: Basic expectations for safe care. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 43 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes basic infection-prevention recommendations for all oral health care settings. Contents include information about the fundamental elements needed to prevent transmission of infectious agents and the importance of routine risk assessment. Topics include administrative measures, infection-prevention education and training, personnel safety, program evaluation, standard precautions, and water quality. The appendices contain a checklist for assessing overall policies and practices and for direct observation of personnel and patient-care practices; recommendations; and references and resources organized by topic area. A mobile application and a Spanish version of the document are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/OralHealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Spanish language materials, Dental care, Dental offices, Disease prevention, Health facilities, Infection control, Mobile health units, Oral health, Personnel, Professional Education, Program evaluation, Risk assessment, Safety, Standards, Training

Aronson S, ed. 2014. Model child care health policies (5th ed.). Bryn Mawr, PA: American Academy of Pediatrics, Pennsylvania Chapter; Media, PA: Early Childhood Education Linkage System, Healthy Child Care Pensylvania, 229 pp.

Annotation: These model policies for out-of-home child care providers (both family day care homes and child care centers) are intended for use dependent on the issues and concerns of a particular setting. Contents include admissions/enrollment/attendance; supervision and provision of social-emotional supportive care; planned program, teaching, and guidance; nutrition, food handling, and feeding; physical activity and screen time; daytime sleeping, evening, nighttime, and drop-i care; sanitation and hygiene; environmental health; transportation (motor vehicle, bicycle/tricycle, or other wheeled toys), pedestrian safety, and field trips; health plan; care of children and staff members who are acutely ill or injured; security; emergencies and disasters; child abuse and neglect (child maltreatment); smoking, prohibited substances, and weapons; human resources and personnel policies; design and maintenance of the physical plant and contents; and review and revision of policies, plans and procedures. The appendices contain sample forms, logs, checklists, records, and sample letters that may be reproduced for any use except resale. This section also includes a list of resources for staff, training, publishers of technical standards, and health education materials.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Pennsylvania Chapter, Rose Tree Corporate Cnter II, 1400 N. Providence Road, Suite 3007, Media, PA 19063-2043, Telephone: (800) 243-2357 Secondary Telephone: (215) 520-9125 E-mail: syunghans@paaap.org Web Site: http://www.paaap.org Available from the website; Hard copies available from AAP Bookstore for $40.00, plus shipping and handling, $35.00, plus shipping and handling for AAP members.. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-58110-826-2.

Keywords: Child care, Child health, Child safety, Guidelines, Models, Out of home care, Policy development, Standards

National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care. 2013. Stepping stones to caring for our children: National health and safety performance standards–Guidelines for early care and education programs: Protecting children from harm (3rd ed.). Denver, CO: University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care, 151 pp.

Annotation: This booklet contains 138 standards to advance the quality and safety of early care and education environments. It is a companion to Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards -- Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3rd edition (CFOC3). The booklet comprises a subset of the standards contained in CFO3, including new and updated standards on safe sleep, handling and feeding of human milk, introducing solid foods to infants, monitoring children's development, unimmunized children, preventing expulsions, and availability of drinking water. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Children with special health care needs, Facilities, Health promotion, Learning activities, Management, Nutrition, Out of home care, Personnel, Safety, Spanish language materials, Standards

Benjamin SE, ed. 2012. Making food healthy and safe for children: How to meet the Caring For Our Children national health and safety performance standards—Guidelines for out-of-home child care programs (2nd ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, 72 pp.

Annotation: This revised manual is intended to help child care providers provide children with safe and healthy food and meet nutrition standards. The manual discusses the following topics: (1) keeping everything clean and safe, (2) using foods that are safe to eat, (3) storing foods safely, (4) planning to meet children's nutritional needs, (5) promoting pleasant meals and snacks, and (6) helping children and families learn about food. References are included. The manual includes three appendices: (1) Caring for Our Children standards, (2) community resources, and (3) resource list. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, University of North Carolina, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 116-A South Merritt Mill Road, CB# 8126, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8126, Telephone: (919) 966-3780 Fax: (919) 843-4752 E-mail: nti@unc.edu Web Site: http://www.nti.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Family child care, Food safety, Health and safety, Nutrition, Out of home care, Standards

Gorelick M. 2001. Predicting Short Term Outcomes in Acute Pediatric Asthma: [Final report]. Wilmington, DE: University of Pennsylvania, 84 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to: 1) identify those signs and symptoms that were associated with the need for hospitalization in acute asthma of children and 2) develop and validate a clinical prediction rule to differentiate those children requiring admission from those capable of discharge. The creation of a new tool to improve accuracy of prediction of short-term outcomes in acute childhood asthma will reduce both inappropriate admission and discharge, with enormous potential for reducing both economic costs and morbidity. Approximately 768 children, mostly African-American, ages 2 years and older, treated in the emergency department of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for acute asthma comprised the sample for this study. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2001-106922.

Keywords: Adolescents, Asthma, Blacks, Case Management, Children with Special Health care Needs, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, Cost Effectiveness, Health Care Utilization, MCH Research, Preschool Children, Research, School Age Children, Standards of Care

Lieu T. 2001. "BABE: The Birth and Beyond Experiences Study" Home Versus Group Visits After Early Postpartum Discharge: [Final report]. Oakland, CA: Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, 30 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that low-risk mothers and newborns will be at reduced risk of adverse health outcome if assigned to receive a home visit rather than a group clinic visit on the third postpartum day. Low-risk mothers and newborns were identified prior to hospital discharge. These study subjects were enrolled, interviewed, and randomized to a home visit (intervention) or a group clinic visit (usual care) on the third postpartum day. Outcome data were obtained from telephone interviews with mothers from computerized utilization databases at Kaiser Permanente. An adverse health outcome was defined as any of the following during the first 14 postpartum days: an urgent clinic visit by the newborn or mother, breastfeeding discontinuation, maternal depressive symptoms, or rehospitalization of the newborn and/or the mother. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2002-101952.

Keywords: Home Visiting Programs, Home Visiting Services, Infant Health Care, Infant Morbidity, Infants, Infants, MCH Research, Neonates, Newborn infants, Perinatal Health, Postpartum Women, Postpartum Women, Research, Standards of Care

Graves DE, Suitor CW, Holt KA, eds. 1997. Making food healthy and safe for children: How to meet the national health and safety performance standards—Guidelines for out-of-home child care programs. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 86 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended to help child care providers offer children healthy, safe foods that meet the nutrition standards presented in National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs. Chapters cover cleanliness, ways to ensure that foods are safe to eat, planning to meet children's nutritional needs, promoting pleasant meals and snacks, and helping children and families learn about foods. Appendices contain lists of resources and materials for centers and for parents. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHI085.

Keywords: Child care centers, Family child care, Food safety, Health and safety, Nutrition, Out of home care, Standards

Pollack M. 1994. Reducing the Nation's Pediatric Intensive Care Mortality [Final report]. Washington, DC: Children's National Medical Center, 84 pp.

Annotation: Data indicated that the quality of pediatric intensive care was not uniform, resulting in the unnecessary deaths of numerous infants and children each year. This proposal investigated four primary, intensive care characteristics using an objective, quantitative methodology that could be applied to future studies. This methodology, validated in a national study, indicated that there was a precise relationship between severity of illness (physiologic instability as assessed by the Pediatric Risk of Mortality [PRISM] score) and intensive care outcome (i.e, survival or death) in university pediatric ICUs with intensivist directors. The investigators hypothesized that the precise relationship between severity of illness and outcome would not hold consistently in all pediatric ICUs, resulting in underestimation of mortality. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB95-227864.

Keywords: Child Mortality, Intensive Care, MCH Research, Pediatric Intensive Care Units, Research, Standards of Care

Michigan Department of Health. 1962. Evaluation check list based on the Academy of Pediatrics manual Care of Children in Hospitals. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Health, 32 pp.

Annotation: This evaluation list is designed to help implement the recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics manual, Care of Children in Hospitals. The chapters conform to those of the Academy manual and the recommendations are consistent with the Rules and Minimum Standards for Hospitals of the Michigan Department of Health. Items are coded by the decimal system for quick reference and machine tabulation. It is intended to be useful for a hospital to evaluate its facilities, policies, and procedures for pediatric care; comparing its care of children with a recognized standard; identifying problems in the organization and operation of the pediatric service; and establishing priorities for the solution of the problems.

Keywords: American Academy of Pediatrics, Evaluation, Hospitals, Michigan, Pediatric care, Standards

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.