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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

Safe Kids Worldwide. 2014. Changing the culture of youth sports. Washington, DC: Safe Kids Worldwide, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of athletes in grades 7-10, coaches of athletes in grades 7-10, and parents with children who play sports in grades 1-10 about sports injuries and what is being done to keep young athletes safe while playing sports. The report provides information on sports injuries in children, players who play injured, injuries resulting from foul play, and opportunities to improve coaches' knowledge and skills. Tips on sports safety are also included.

Contact: Safe Kids Worldwide, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20004-1707, Telephone: (202) 662-0600 Fax: (202) 393-2072 E-mail: info@safekids.org Web Site: http://www.safekids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Athletes, Child safety, Children, Injury prevention, International health, International programs, Program improvement, Recreational safety, Risk taking, Safety programs, Sports equipment, Sports injuries, Team sports

Community Preventive Services Task Force. 2014. Oral health: Preventing craniofacial injuries, comunity-based interventions to encourage use of helmets, facemasks, and mouthguards in contact sports. Atlanta, GA: Community Preventive Services Task Force, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document provides findings related to the effectiveness of community-based interventions to encourage use of helmets, facemasks, and mouth guards in contact sports and offers a general task force finding on the strength of available evidence to support such interventions. Information is presented on the rationale for the task force finding, including the basis for the finding, applicability and generalizability issues, data-quality issues, other benefits and harms, considerations for implementation, and evidence gaps.

Contact: Community Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MSE69, Atlanta, GA 30329, Telephone: (404) 498-6595 E-mail: communityguide@cdc.gov Web Site: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-members

Keywords: Injury prevention, Intervention, Oral health, Research, Safety, Sports injuries

American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 2013. Treatment of facial injury. Rosemont, IL: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, 1 v.

Annotation: This resources provides information on treating and preventing maxillofacial injuries, also referred to as facial trauma. Topics include the role of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in treating injuries to teeth, the mouth, jaws, and facial structures. The resource also discusses the importance of making safety gear such as protective mouth guards, masks, and helmets part of standard athletic equipment. Recommendations for injury prevention in specific sports are included.

Contact: American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, 9700 West Bryn Mawr Avenue, Rosemont, IL 60018-5701, Telephone: (847) 678-6200 Secondary Telephone: (800) 822-6637 Fax: (847) 678-6286 Web Site: http://myoms.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Facial injuries, Injury prevention, Oral health, Sports equipment, Sports injuries

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Traumatic brain injury (TBI): Resource guide 2013. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network, 14 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide provides information to help state maternal and child health and injury and violence prevention programs respond to the needs of infants, adolescents, and adults who are at risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Topics include fall prevention, motor vehicle safety, bicycle safety, sports safety, and abuse prevention. It also contains links to data, research studies, information on policy and legislation, prevention strategies, tools for program planning, and a list of national organizations that address TBI.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bicycle injuries, Brain damage, Brain injuries, Child safety, Children, Falls, Infants, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle safety, Physical abuse, Sports injuries, Violence prevention

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Sports-related concussions in children and adolescents: Fact sheets. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network, 6 items.

Annotation: This web site contains fact sheets to provide public health professionals with a summary of information on a traumatic brain injury (TBI) that affects many children and adolescents, Topics include an overview of sports-related concussions, strategies for preventing sports-related concussions and subsequent injury, legislation on sports-related concussions, the role of public health professionals in prevention, information and resources on TBI, as well as references and suggested readings.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain damage, Brain injuries, Injury prevention, Public health education, Resources for professionals, Sports injuries

National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment. 2013. Get a heads up on concussion: Heads up to parents. Atlanta, GA: CDC Foundation, 1 v.

Annotation: This app and website are tools to help those who play a role in keeping children and adolescents safe from concussion and other serious brain injuries. The resources were created by the CDC Foundation with support from the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment. The app helps parents select helmets and provides safety information and tips on spotting concussions. The website offers a variety of materials, including videos, fact sheets, and training courses.

Contact: CDC Foundation, 600 Peachtree Street, N.E., Suite 1000, Atanta, GA 30308, Telephone: (404) 653-0790 Secondary Telephone: (888) 880-4CDC Fax: (404) 653-0330 Web Site: http;//www.cdcfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain injuries, Head injuries, Injury prevention, Mobile applications, Multimedia, Sports equipment, Sports injuries

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Strategies for preventing sports-related concussions and subsequent injury. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network, 5 items.

Annotation: This fact sheet discusses ways to reduce the risk of concussion during sports and recreational activities and the role of preventive equipment in prevention. The fact sheet includes tips for coaches, parents, and athletes, discusses findings from the literature and recommendations from professional organizations, and provides a list of related fact sheets.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Athletes, Child health, Education, Guidelines, Head injuries, Prevention, Safety, Sports, Training

Graham R, Rivara FP, Ford MA, Spicer CM, eds.; Institute of Medicine, Committee on Sports-Related Concussions in Youth and National Research Council. 2013. Sports-related concussions in youth: Improving the science, changing the culture. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 340 pp., brief (4 pp.)

Annotation: This report provides information about the science of sports-related concussion in children and adolescents. Topics include an overview of normal brain development; considerations pertaining to the recognition, diagnosis, and acute management of concussions; treatment and management of individuals with concussion symptoms that persist beyond the typical 1- to 2-week recovery period; issues surrounding repetitive head impacts that do not produce the signs and symptoms of a concussion, as well as multiple concussions; interventions that may reduce the risk of sports-related concussions; and legislation directed toward concussion education and athlete protection. A brief is also available.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $78.00 plus shipping and handling; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-29637-3.

Keywords: Adolescents, Brain injuries, Children, Legislation, Patient care management, Research, Risk management, Sports injuries

Levi J, Segal LM, Kohn D. 2012. The facts hurt: A state-by-state injury prevention policy report. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 75 pp. (Issue report)

Annotation: This report provides information about state injury prevention policies and about recommendations for evidence-based strategies to reduce injuries in the United States. It focuses on a series of 10 injury-prevention indicators across each state that, collectively, offer an overview of areas of strength and weakness in the state's injury-prevention policies. Topics include vehicle injuries; violence-related injuries; falls; drowning; sports- and recreation-related injuries; injuries from poisoning; research tools for reducing injuries; and fire-related injuries.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Burns, Drowning, Falls, Injuries, Injury prevention, Poisoning, Recreational injuries, Research, Sports injuries, State initiatives, Transportation injuries, Violence

American Academy of Ophthalmology . 2012. Eye health in sports and recreation. [San Francisco, CA]: American Academy of Ophthalmology ,

Annotation: This web page, which is part of a website about vision in general, provides information about eye health in sports and recreation. Topics include high-risk sports (baseball, basketball, and racquet sports), other risky leisure activities (such as home repairs, yardwork, cleaning, and cooking), and diagnosis of concussion in athletes. The site also offers options for finding an eye doctor by location and for asking an eye doctor questions.

Contact: American Academy of Ophthalmology, 655 Beach Street, San Francisco, CA 94109, Telephone: (415) 561-8500 Fax: (415) 561-8533 E-mail: comm@aao.org Web Site: http://www.aao.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Baseball, Basketball, Eye care, Eye injuries, Physical activity, Prevention, Prevention, Sports injuries

American Optometric Association. [2009]. School-aged vision: 6 to 18 years of age. St. Louis, MO: American Optometric Association, 4 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides information about vision needs for school-age children and adolescents (ages 6-18). The brochure offers information on why good vision is important during this period and discusses vision skills needed for school success, signs of eye and vision problems, when a vision exam is needed, and sports vision and eye protection.

Contact: American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, First Floor , St. Louis, MO 63141, Telephone: (314) 991-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 365-2219 Fax: (314) 991-4101 Web Site: http://www.aoanet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Safety, School age children, Sports injuries, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision tests

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2009. CDC injury research agenda. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 116 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's research agenda, 2009-2018, which focuses on answering questions that will have a relatively rapid impact on how we prevent injuries and reduce their consequences. Topics include cross-cutting priorities for injury research, injury response; unintentional injury prevention at home and in the community, preventing injuries in sports, recreation, and exercise, (4) preventing transportation injuries; preventing child maltreatment, sexual violence and intimate partner violence, preventing suicidal behavior, and preventing youth violence.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Child abuse, Communities, Disabilities, Domestic violence, Injuries, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle injuries, Recreational injuries, Rehabilitation, Research, Residential injuries, Sports injuries, Suicide prevention, Violence, Violence prevention

Prevent Blindness America. 2005. Recommended sports eye protectors. Chicago, IL: Prevent Blindness America, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the proper types of eye protection to use for preventing eye injuries while playing sports. Type of eye protection and the types of eye injuries that can be prevented are discussed for each of the following sports: (1) baseball, (2) basketball, (3) soccer, (4) football, and (5) hockey. A phone number for more information is included.

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Eye care, Eye injuries, Prevention, Safety, Safety equipment, Sports, Sports injuries

Truman BI, Gooch BF, Sulemana , Horowitz AM, Gift HC, Evans CA. 2001. Promoting oral health: Interventions for preventing dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sport-related craniofacial injuries—A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services. MMWR Recommendations and Reports 50(RR-21):1-14,

Annotation: This document reports on systematic reviews of the effectiveness of selected population-based interventions to prevent and control dental caries, oral and pharyngeal cancers, and sports-related craniofacial injuries. The report presents the recommendations of the task force, describes how the reviews were conducted, and provides information designed to help apply the recommended interventions locally.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/OralHealth Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community programs, Dental caries, Facial injuries, Fluorides, Head injuries, Health promotion, Oral cancer, Oral health, Pharyngeal diseases, Prevention, Sports injuries, Water

Seltzer VL, Pearce WH, eds. 2000. Women's primary health care: Office practice and procedures. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: McGraw Hill, 1216 pp.

Annotation: This book is intended to assist the clinician in providing lifelong preventive and primary care to women in the office setting. It is organized into eight parts and contains many tables, references, and an index. Topics include the social context of women's health, prevention, health care needs over the course of life, reproductive health and disorders, office diagnostic procedures, psychiatric and psychosocial issues and societal violence, general health, drug therapies and interactions, ethics for the practitioner, risk management, alternative medicine, and patient education in the office.

Contact: McGraw-Hill Companies, PO Box 182604, Columbus, OH 43272, Telephone: (877) 833-5524 Fax: (614) 759-3749 E-mail: customer.service@mcgraw-hill.com Web Site: http://www.mcgraw-hill.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-07-058044-8.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Diabetes, Diagnosis, Domestic violence, Eating disorders, Ethics, Life cycle, Lung diseases, Medical records, Mental health, Patient education, Pregnancy, Prevention, Reproductive health, Screening, Social factors, Sports injuries, Substance abuse, Women's health

Strasburger VC, Brown RT. 1998. Adolescent medicine: A practical guide (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company, 514 pp.

Annotation: This book provides information on communication, diagnosis, and therapy for adolescent patients. The authors emphasize the role of the caregiver as a sensitive counselor when interacting with adolescent patients. It is a straightforward and practical reference which presents a review of the most commonly encountered adolescent issues, including: growth and development, chronic illness and disability, substance abuse, sexuality, common medical complaints, adolescent psychosocial concerns such as suicide, depression and eating disorders.

Contact: Little, Brown and Company, Hatchette Book Group USA, 237 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (800) 759-0190 E-mail: customer.service@hbgusa.com Web Site: http://www.hatchettebookgroupusa.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent medicine, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Asthma, Behavior problems, Chronic fatigue syndrome, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Contraception, Depression, Diabetes mellitus, Eating disorders, Headaches, Homosexuality, Infectious mononucleosis, Menstruation, Mental health, Obesity, Pregnant adolescents, Psychosexual development, Sexually transmitted diseases, Sports injuries, Sports injuries, Substance abusers, Suicide, Thyroid diseases, Urinary tract infections

Children's Safety Network. 1994. Building safe communities: State and local strategies for preventing injury and violence. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 190 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides descriptions of injury prevention projects implemented in several states. These projects were carried out by state and local departments of health, and by other health/injury-related entities. Interventions cover 12 specific injuries and two overarching contributing factors—firearms and alcohol. For each project, the manual describes the problem, the project objective(s), components, maternal and child health (MCH) role, resources needed, lessons learned, and evaluation. These cases represent concrete examples of what has been tried, what has worked, and what has not. The case studies are indexed by age group protected, by primary target audience, by state, and by MCH setting. Appendices include nine key injury prevention activities for state MCH agencies, and a sample case study format. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Alcohol, Assault, Bicycles, Burns, Case studies, Correlates of injury, Drowning, Evaluation, Family violence, Firearms, Homicide, Injury prevention, Motor vehicles, Occupational injuries, Playgrounds, Program development, Residential injuries, Sexual abuse, Sports, Suicide

Children's Safety Network. 1991. Child Health Day 1991: A selected annotated bibliography. [Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health], 31 pp.

Annotation: This annotated bibliography includes items recommended by members of the planning committee for Child Health Day 1991. Sections of the bibliography address overviews of injury issues; injury data; program components (overview, program development, advocacy, coalition building, and training); and injury types and causes (overview, bicycles, child care, drowning, falls, firearms, fire/burns, motor vehicles, occupational injuries, pedestrians, playgrounds, sports, toys, and violence). The bibliography also contains resource lists. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: (703) 625-7802 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE014.

Keywords: Advocacy, Bicycles, Burns, Child Care, Children, Coalitions, Curricula, Data, Directories, Drowning, Educational materials, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Health observances, Injury prevention, Motor vehicles, Occupational injuries, Pedestrians, Playgrounds, Program development, Sports, Toys, Traffic safety, Violence

Dyment PG. 1991. Sports and the adolescent. Philadelphia, PA: Hanley and Belfus, 250 pp. (Adolescent medicine: State of the art reviews; v. 2, no. 1)

Annotation: This volume was written for primary care physicians who have a particular interest in adolescents and who are looking for information that will help them care for the young athletes in their practice. Topics discussed include the sport physical; medical exclusion from sport; menstruation; stress; status of adolescent fitness; steroids; death on the playing field; epidemiology of sport injuries; management of soft tissue injuries; head injuries; catastrophic head and neck injuries; overuse syndromes of the shoulder and arm, and overuse syndromes of the back and legs in adolescents.

Contact: Hanley and Belfus, 210 South 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, Telephone: (215) 546-4995 Contact Phone: (800) 962-1892 Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Injuries, Injury prevention, Menstruation, Sports medicine, Steroids, Stress

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 1990. Youth risk behavior survey. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control, 4 items.

Annotation: This 75-item questionnaire was developed as part of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance (YRBS) System established by the Centers for Disease Control, Division of Adolescent and School Health. The YRBS System uses a school-based survey to monitor the incidence and prevalence of priority health risk behaviors among youth (grades 9–12) in six categories including: (1) behaviors that result in intentional and unintentional injuries; (2) tobacco use; (3) drug and alcohol use; (4) sexual behaviors that result in HIV infection, sexually transmitted diseases, and unintentional pregnancy; (5) dietary behaviors; and (6) physical activity. State and local departments of education may use all or parts of the 75-item questionnaire to conduct the YRBS. Additional background information includes: an overview of the YRBS question rationale, a three-page handout on commonly asked questions about the YRBS, and a flow sheet outlining the YRBS System Behavioral Delineation and Instrument Development Process.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Contact Phone: (404) 639-3824 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Adolescent nutrition, Adolescent pregnancy, HIV, Injuries, Motor vehicles, National surveys, Physical fitness, Population surveillance, Risk assessment, Risk factors, Sexually transmitted diseases, Sports, Substance abuse, Violence

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.