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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (62 total).

Utah Children. 2016. Measures of child well-being in Utah. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Children, annual.

Annotation: This annual statistical summary provides information on the health, education, safety, and economic security of children in Utah. The introduction includes general demographic information about the state and presents a long-range view of what factors contribute to a family's well-being. Analytical essays are included for each category of data reviewed and the statistics are presented in tables by county with state totals. This publication continues "Key Facts," which was published between 1990 and 1994.

Contact: Voices for Utah Children, 747 East South Temple, Suite 100, Salt Lake City, UT 84102, Telephone: (801) 364-1182 Secondary Telephone: (877) 445-2447 Fax: (801) 364-1186 E-mail: karen@utahchildren.org Web Site: http://www.utahchildren.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child safety, Children, Data, Demographics, Education, Family economics, Health status, Socioeconomic factors, Utah

Love HL, Soleimanpour S, Schelar E, Even M, Carrozza M, Grandmont J. 2016. Children's health and education mapping tool. Washington, DC: School-Based Health Alliance, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool contains county-level information on child health, education, and socioeconomic status that can be searched, mapped, downloaded, and compared to national averages. Users can also map, filter, and display key characteristics of public school and school-based health center locations. A user manual and video tutorials are provided.

Contact: School-Based Health Alliance, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5872 Secondary Telephone: (888) 286-8727 Fax: (202) 638-5879 E-mail: info@nasbhc.org Web Site: http://www.sbh4all.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Education, Information systems, Integrated information systems, Maps, School based clinics, Schools, Socioeconomic status

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2015. The health and well-being of children in rural areas: A portrait of the nation. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 61 pp. (The national survey of children's health)

Annotation: This chartbook presents data from the National Survey of Children's Health. Contents include indicators of the health and well-being of children, including oral health status; a discussion of supportive and risk factors in the family environment; and a discussion of aspects of neighborhoods that may support or threaten families and children on the national level within high-risk subpopulations for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Supplemental data tables on child health status, health care, school and activities, a child's family, and a child's and family's neighborhood are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Family economics, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, National surveys, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Risk factors, Rural population, Schools, Socioeconomic status, Statistical data

Trust for America's Health. 2015. The state of obesity. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, annual.

Annotation: This resource provides information about obesity among young children, adolescents, and adults in the United States. Contents include obesity rates and trends by age, household income, and race and ethnicity; policy analysis; state briefs; fast facts; and other resources. Topics include the relationship between weight and diabetes, hypertension, and physical inactivity; the health care costs of obesity; food insecurity, food deserts, and healthy weights; and socioeconomics and obesity.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Barriers, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Costs, Data sources, Financing, Health status, Low income groups, Nutrition, Obesity, Policy development, Schools, Socioeconomic factors, State programs, Trends, Young children

Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management. 2014. diversitydatakids.org. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides information on the demographics of children and families in the United States, key factors that drive child outcomes, and issues of racial/ethnic socioeconomic equity in child health and wellbeing. Users can query, compare, and analyze data by race and ethnicity; compare data across states, metropolitan areas, counties, large cities, and large school districts; explore metropolitan area maps of the Child Opportunity Index; and obtain equity assessments of social policies affecting children. Fact sheets are also available.

Contact: Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, 415 South Street MS 035, Waltham, MA 02454-9110, Telephone: (781) 736-3820 Web Site: http://heller.brandeis.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Neighborhoods, Racial factors, Social policy, Socioeconomic status, Statistics

Braverman P, Egerter S, Arena K, Aslam R. 2014. Early childhood experiences shape health and well-being throughout life. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief explains how economic and social conditions early in life shape children's health and development, affecting their health as adults; the evidence connecting early childhood programs with health; what works, apart from the need for services for parents; the business case for investing in early childhood programs; and examples of high-quality early childhood programs. A table highlighting several early childhood programs and the ways they affect health is included.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Family characteristics, Health status, Life course, Model programs, Quality assurance, Socioeconomic status, Young children

FDI World Dental Federation. 2014. Oral health worldwide. Cointrin, Switzerland: FDI World Dental Federation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the state of oral health worldwide and highlights cost-effective solutions for health care systems and individuals. Topics include facts about oral health,, the connection between oral health and general health, the burden and economic impact of oral diseases, inequalities and disparities in oral health, why oral diseases are neglected internationally, how oral health relates to development goals, and how oral health can be improved.

Contact: FDI World Dental Federation, Tour de Cointrin, Avenue Louie Casai 51, Case P.O. Box 3, 1216 Cointrin-Geneve, Switzerland Telephone: (41) 22 560 81 50 Fax: (41) 22 560 81 40 E-mail: info@fdiworldental.org Web Site: http://www.fdiworldental.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Goals, Health care systems, Health disparities, Health status, International health, Oral health, Program improvement, Service integration, Socioeconomic factors

National Council of La Raza. (2013). Latino Kids Data Explorer. Washington, DC: National Council of La Raza,

Annotation: This database is a user-friendly tool that provides data on Latino children in the United States. As an update and expansion of NCLR’s 2010 publication America’s Future: Latino Child Well-Being in Numbers and Trends, the Data Explorer offers 27 national- and state-level indicators of Latino child well-being, including demographic, health, education, housing, income, and juvenile justice variables. The data are available by age group (0–2, 0–4, 0–8, 0–17) and include time trend and racial/ethnic comparisons.

Contact: National Council of La Raza, 1126 16th Street, NW. Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 785-1670 Fax: (202) 776-1792 E-mail: comments@ncir.org Web Site: http://www.nclr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Children, Data, Demography, Hispanic Americans, Juvenile justice, Socioeconomic status

Golden O, McDaniel M, Loprest P, Stanczyk A. 2013. Disconnected mothers and the well-being of children: A research report. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 48 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents research findings on the major risks to children’s development, the prevalence of those risks among disconnected families, and the potential consequences for children. It also describes potential interventions to help disconnected families by increasing and stabilizing family income, enhancing parenting skills, supporting children directly, and reaching out to disconnected mothers who are not citizens. Finally, directions for future research are provided.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Families, Life course, Low income groups, Mother child relations, Poverty, Risk factors, Single mothers, Socioeconomic status, Unemployment

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. CDC disparities and inequalities report—United States, 2013. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 62(3):1-186,

Annotation: This report assesses health disparities in the United States across a wide range of diseases, behavioral risk factors, environmental exposures, social determinants, and health-care access issues. It raises awareness of differences among groups regarding selected health outcomes and health determinants and to prompt actions to reduce disparities. Topics include social determinants of health, environmental hazards, health care access and preventive services, behavioral risk factors, morbidity, mortality, and future directions.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Chronic disease, Disease prevention, Health status disparities, Injury prevention, Preventive health services, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data, Trends

Anderson KL, Olson S, and Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. 2013. Leveraging culture to address health inequalities: Examples from Native communities—Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 91 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a workshop convened in November 2012 to discuss the sizable health inequities affecting Native American, Alaska Native, First Nation, and Pacific Islander populations and the potential role of culture in helping to reduce those inequities. This report summarizes the presentations and discussion of the workshop and includes case studies that examine programs aimed at diabetes prevention and management and cancer prevention and treatment programs.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu $36, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website, after registration. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-29256-6.

Keywords: Minority health, Alaska natives, American Indians, Barriers, Cancer, Cultural factors, Diabetes mellitus, Disease prevention, Health status disparities, Pacific Islanders, Prevention services, Preventive health services, Socioeconomic factors

Dye BA, Li X, Beltran-Aguilar ED. 2012. Selected oral health indicators in the United States, 2005-2008. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 8 pp. (NCHS data brief no. 96)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005–2008, on the oral health status of children and adolescents (ages 5–19) and adults. Topics include untreated dental caries and dental restoration prevalence by age, race and ethnicity, and poverty level. The prevalence of dental sealants, complete tooth retention, and edentulism are also addressed.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Dental caries, Health status, Oral health, Prevalence, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

McPheeters ML, Kripalani S, Peterson, NB, Idowu RT, Jerome RN, Potter SA, Andrews JC. 2012. Quality improvement interventions to address health disparities: Closing the quality gap—Revisiting the state of the science. U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 475 pp., exec. summ. (15 pp.). (Evidence report/technology assessment; no. 208)

Annotation: This literature review (from 1983-2011) evaluates the effectiveness of quality improvement (QI) strategies in reducing disparities in health and health care. The review focused on 12 clinical conditions and assessed health disparities associated with race or ethnicity, socioeconomic status, insurance status, sexual orientation, health literacy/numeracy, and language barrier. Contents are divided into the following sections: background on QI and health disparities approaches, scope and key questions of focus for the review, methods used, a results overview, and discussion of main findings. References, tables, and appendices are also inlcuded.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pu.b No. 12-E009-EF.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Health care disparities, Health insurance, Health literacy, Health status disparities, Language barriers, Literature reviews, Minority health, Racial factors, Sexual identity, Socioeconomic status

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2012. Disabilities and inequalities in maternal and infant health outcomes. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 14 pp.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. 2011–. County health rankings and roadmaps. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides access to 50 state reports, ranking counties within the 50 states according to its health outcomes and the multiple health factors that determine a county's health. Each county receives a summary rank for its health outcomes and health factors and also for each of four health factors: health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, and the physical environment. Users can drill down to see specific county-level data (as well as state benchmarks) for the measures upon which the rankings are based. The website contains information on the approach, ranking methods, action steps, and descriptions of health improvement efforts from around the country.

Contact: University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Population Health Sciences, 610 Walnut Street, 575 WARF, Madison, WI 53726, Telephone: (608) 263-6294 Fax: (608) 262-6404 E-mail: UWPHI@med.wisc.edu Web Site: http://uwphi.pophealth.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Environmental influences, Health behavior, Health services, Health status, Online systems, Public health, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

Seith D, Kalof C. 2011. Who are America's poor children? Examining health disparities by race and ethnicity. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses health disparities among poor children by race and ethnicity, examining selected disparities in six domains of health risk and health status: family composition and poverty, food insecurity, environmental conditions, health insurance coverage, access to healthcare services, and health outcomes. It also addresses how public policies might help reduce relevant disparities.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Health status disparities, Low income groups, Poverty, Public policy, Socioeconomic factors

Nyberg K, Ramirez A, Gallion K. 2011. Addressing nutrition, overweight and obesity among Latino youth. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 12 pp. (Salud America!)

Annotation: This report examines the environmental, socioeconomic and cultural factors that influence nutrition, overweight and obesity among Latino youth. It summarizes the authors' key research findings, including the relatively high prevalence of food insecurity and high body mass index (BMI) among Latino children and adolescents, and suggests areas for future research that would help identify links between nutrition, physical activity, overweight and obesity among Latino youth.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Cultural factors, Ethnic factors, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Nutrition, Obesity, Research, Socioeconomic factors

Egerter S, Braveman P, Sadegh-Nobari T, Grossman-Kahn R, Dekker M. 2011. Education and health: Exploring the social determinants of health. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Commission to Build a Healthier America, 17 pp. (Issue brief no. 5)

Annotation: This issue brief examines three major pathways through which educational attainment is linked with health: health knowledge and behaviors; employment and income; and social and psychological factors, including sense of control, social standing and social support. In addition, the brief explores how educational attainment affects health across generations, examining the links between parents’ education—and the social and economic advantages it represents—and their children’s health and social advantages, including opportunities for educational attainment.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Life course, Barriers, Educational attainment, Health behavior, Health status, Health status disparities, Research, Socioeconomic factors

2010. [Discussion paper series on social determinants of health]. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization,

Annotation: This series of papers provides a forum for sharing knowledge on how to tackle the social determinants of health to improve health equity. The papers explore themes related to questions of strategy, governance, tools, and capacity building. They aim to review country experiences with an eye to understanding practice, innovations, and encouraging frank debate on the connections between health and the broader policy environment.

Contact: WHO Press, World Health Organization, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland, Telephone: +41 22 791 3264 Fax: +41 22 791 4857 E-mail: bookorders@who.int Web Site: http://apps.who.int/bookorders/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health status disparities, International health, Patient advocacy, Resource allocation, Socioeconomic factors

Singh GK. 2010. Maternal mortality in the United States, 1935-2007: Substantial racial/ethnic, socioeconomic, and geographic disparities persist. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 10 pp. (75 Title V anniversary celebration)

Annotation: This report analyzes trends in U.S. maternal mortality for the years from 1935 through 2007. The report analyzes the data according to race/ethnicity, socioeconomic position (family poverty level), and state and region of residence by using both historical and the latest national vital statistics data. The report points out the racial, socioeconomic and regional disparities that remain despite the massive drop in maternal mortality over the long ter,. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Geographic factors, Health status disparities, History, Maternal mortality, Racial factors, Reports, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical analysis, Statistics, Trends

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.