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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (43 total).

Golden J. 2018. Babies made us modern: How infants brought America into the twentieth century. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press,

Annotation: This book examines how babies shaped American society and culture and led their families into the modern world to become more accepting of scientific medicine, active consumers, open to new theories of human psychological development, and welcoming of government advice and programs. The book also examines the influence of cultural traditions and religious practices upon the diversity of infant lives, exploring the ways class, race, region, gender, and community shaped life in the nursery and household.

Contact: Cambridge University Press, 32 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10013-2473, Telephone: 212-924-3900 Secondary Telephone: (914) 937-9600 Fax: 212-691-3239 E-mail: information@cup.org Web Site: http://www.cambridge.org/us/

Keywords: Community role, Cultural beliefs, Infants, Regional factors, Religion, Social change, Social factors, Sociocultural factors

O'Neil M, Sweetland J, Fond M. 2017. Unlocking the door to new thinking: Frames for advancing oral health reform. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 28 pp. (FrameWorks message memo)

Annotation: This document outlines findings from research on how Americans think about oral health and explains these findings’ implications for communication, outreach, and advocacy. Topics include how the public thinks about oral health and related issues, implications of attitudes toward oral health for advancing an informed public conversation, and communications tools and techniques.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Advocacy, Barriers, Communication, Community action, Disease prevention, Health care reform, Health disparities, Health promotion, Mass media, Oral health, Outreach, Public policy, Service integration, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Systems development, Teamwork

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. 2016. Framework for educating health professionals to address the social determinants of health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 170 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a framework for educating health professionals to address the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, as well as the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life including economic policies, development agendas, cultural and social norms, social policies, and political systems. Contents include theoretical constructs and examples of programs and frameworks addressing elements of the social determinants of health. The framework aligns education, health, and other sectors to meet local needs in partnership with communities.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Continuing education, Cultural diversity, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Health occupations, Inclusive schools, Mentors, Model programs, Models, Professional education, Public health education, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Training, Work force

Pinderhughes H, Davis RA, Williams M. 2016. Adverse community experiences and resilience: A framework for addressing and preventing community trauma. Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 34 pp., exec. summ (6 pp.)

Annotation: This paper explores trauma at the population level and how it impacts efforts to prevent violence and improve other aspects of community health. The paper also presents a framework for addressing and preventing trauma at the community level. Topics include the community environment, the production of trauma from violence, community strategies to address community violence, elements of a resilient community, and promoting community resilience.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Culturally competent services, Economic factors, Emotional trauma, Geographic factors, Health promotion, Models, Prevention programs, Resilience, Social conditions, Social support, Sociocultural factors, Standards, Trauma, Trauma care, Violence prevention

Tappin K. 2015. Inequities in maternal and child health: An analysis of policy, practice, and social determinants over the life-course. Greenbelt, MD: Mid Atlantic Health Policy Research Consortium, 43 pp.

Annotation: This paper examines the social determinants experienced over the life course and their influence on adverse birth outcomes for black women in Maryland. Contents include background on Maryland and data on maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes in Baltimore City, Montgomery County, Prince Georges County, and on the Eastern Shore; vital statistics data on the health of mothers and infants in Maryland; and a set of proposals to strengthen Maryland's policies and programs around MCH.

Contact: Health Policy Research Consortium, CTIS, 6401 Golden Triangle Drive, Suite 310, Greenbelt, MD 20770, Telephone: (301) 375-2021 Fax: (240) 582-7846 E-mail: info@hprc.info Web Site: http://hprc.info Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Blacks, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Infants, Life course, MCH programs, MCH research, MCH services, Maryland, Mothers, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Pregnant women, Program development, Racial discrimination, Racial factors, Racism, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, State programs, Statistical data, Women

Palfrey JS, Ogilus N, Rosen-Reynoso M. 2014. Community health workers and children with special health care needs. Boston, MA: National Center for Ease of Use of Community-Based Services, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from an environmental scan to identify programs that are engaging community health workers (CHWs) and/or community outreach strategies to enhance services for children with special health care needs (CSHCN) from Latino families. The report describes disparities in access to and quality of health services for CSHCN of Latino backgrounds, interventions to decrease racial and ethnic disparities, CHW deployment, and what CHWs can accomplish. Additional contents include the methodology and criteria for the scan, descriptions of exemplary programs, and a discussion of principles and opportunities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau and the HSC Foundation]

Contact: National Center for Ease of Use of Community-Based Services, c/o Institute for Community Inclusion, University of Massachusetts, Boston, 100 Morrissey Boulevard, Boston, MA 02125, Telephone: (617) 287-4370 E-mail: communitybasedsrvcs@umb.edu Web Site: http://communitybasedservices.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Children with special health care needs, Community health services, Community health workers, Competence, HIspanic Americans, Medical home, Model programs, Quality assurance, Sociocultural factors

Dye BA, Li X, Beltran-Aguilar ED. 2012. Selected oral health indicators in the United States, 2005-2008. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 8 pp. (NCHS data brief no. 96)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005–2008, on the oral health status of children and adolescents (ages 5–19) and adults. Topics include untreated dental caries and dental restoration prevalence by age, race and ethnicity, and poverty level. The prevalence of dental sealants, complete tooth retention, and edentulism are also addressed.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Dental caries, Health status, Oral health, Prevalence, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

Grantmakers In Health. 2012. Striving for health equity: Opportunities as identified by leaders in the field. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 29 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on health and health care inequities, highlights the current state of the health disparities arena; identifies key opportunities for reduction and elimination strategies, including areas of opportunity arising from key health reform provisions; and offers a set of recommendations and options for funders considering taking more actionable steps to support health disparities elimination and reduction efforts. The paper offers definitions of key terms, provides a health-equity framework, and summarizes key themes and recommendations.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Costs, Economic factors, Educational factors, Financing, Geographic factors, Health, Health care reform, High risk groups, Low income groups, Racial factors, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, health care

First Focus. 2012. Big ideas: Children in the Southwest. Washington, DC: First Focus, 176 pp.

Annotation: This compilation of 12 papers examines the distinct needs of children in the southwestern United States (Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico) and provides ideas for meeting those needs. Topics include changing demographics; inclusive, culturally relevant, and family-focused policy solutions; successful programs; and establishing common-ground for addressing challenges facing children in the Southwest.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Culturally competent services, Family centered care, Language, Model programs, Policy development, Regional factors, Sociocultural factors, Trends

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University and University of Southern California, School of Cinematic Arts, Interactive Media Division. 2011. Brain hero. [Cambridge, MA]: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 1 video (3 min.).

Annotation: This online video depicts how actions by people in both the family and community can affect a child's development. Based loosely on games such as Sims City, Guitar Hero, and the Game of Life, the video adapts the visual sensibility of interactive game models to portray how actions taken by parents, teachers, policymakers, and others influence the outcome for both the child and surrounding community. A collaboration between the Harvard Center and the Creative Media and Behavioral Health Center at the University of Southern California, this video was developed as part of the educational institutions' joint efforts to inform the public discourse around policies and practices that support healthy brain development during childhood.

Contact: Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: developingchild@harvard.edu Web Site: http://www.developingchild.harvard.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Cognitive development, Cultural factors, Family, Sociocultural factors

Movement Advancement Project, Family Equality Council Center for American Progress with COLAGE, Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute, National Association of Social Workers. 2011. All children matter: How legal and social inequalities hurt LGBT families. Denver, CO: Movement Advancement Project; Boston, MA: Family Equality Council; Washington, DC: Center for American Progress, 125 pp.

Annotation: This report examines how current laws, practices, and social stigma hurt children with lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) parents and work against achieving the goals of securing stable, loving homes for all children and ensuring economic security, heath, and well-being for all children. The authors assess key challenges that stand in the way of achieving these goals and offer recommendations for eliminating or reducing inequities and improving the lives of children with LGBT parents.

Contact: Family Equality Council, P.O. Box 206, Boston, MA 02133, Telephone: (617) 502-8700 Fax: (617) 502-8701 E-mail: info@familyequality.org Web Site: http://www.familyequality.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Children, Economic factors, Families, Homosexuality, Parents, Sex factors, Social discrimination, Social factors, Sociocultural factors

Main E, Morton C, Hopkins D, Giuliani G, Melsop K, Gould J. 2011. Cesarean deliveries, outcomes, and opportunities for change in California: Toward a public agenda for maternity care safety and quality. Palo Alto, CA: California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, 86 pp.

Annotation: This white paper presents the viewpoint that the rise in Cesarean delivery rates in California and in the United States as a whole should be a cause of serious concern, and it calls for a public agenda for maternity care safety and quality. The paper discusses the high rates of Cesarean delivery and how rates vary among states, regions, hospitals, and providers; presents evidence for costs and risks associated with Cesarean delivery; explores the causes of the increase; looks at sociocultural factors that contribute to the increase; outlines a set of complementary strategies for reducing the increase; and offers recommendations.

Contact: California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, Stanford University Medical School Office Building, 1265 Welch Road, MS 5415, Stanford, CA 94305, Telephone: (650) 725-6108 Fax: (650) 721-5751 E-mail: main@cmqcc.org Web Site: http://www.cmqcc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Cesarean section, Childbirth, Costs, Geographic factors, Infant health, Risk factors, Sociocultural factors, Women's health

Haines MR. 2010. Inequality and infant and childhood mortality in the United States in the twentieth century. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 28 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16133)

Annotation: This paper examines trends in the United States during the 20th century using infant and childhood mortality as a social indicator of inequality. Using results from multiple surveys, microdata from the 1900 and 1910 Integrated Public Use Microsamples (IPUMS), published data from the Birth Registration Area in the 1920s, and the Linked Birth & Infant Death Files from the National Center for Health Statistics for 1991, the authors explore the relationship between infant and child mortality and variables such as family income, race, ethnicity, residence, occupation of the father or mother, and education of the parents. Tables include indexes indicating rates of child mortality in the United States in 1900 and 1910 according to the occupation of the father; mortality rates according to social class between the years 1895 and 1966; infant mortality rates by race of mother and education of father in 1991; and infant mortality in eight American cities in 1911-1915 according to variables such as the income of the father, the ethnicity of the mother, and whether or not the infant was breastfed.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mortality, Data analysis, Educational factors, Ethnic factors, History, Infant mortality, Racial factors, Research, Social factors, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Trends

National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation, Children's Safety Network. 2010. Bullying prevention: Strategies to support statewide collaboration. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation,

Annotation: This webinar brought together public and private sector stakeholders to share outcomes and lessons learned from the Highmark Healthy High 5 Bullying Prevention Institute, which has implemented the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in schools across Pennsylvania. Topics include strategies to implement the population-wide public health initiative to spur national behavior and culture change and ultimately prevent school-based bullying across the United States. The webinar archive (presentation slides with audio) and additional resources are available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Bullying, Conference proceedings, Prevention programs, School health programs, Sociocultural factors, Strategic planning, Violence prevention

CityMatCH. 2010. History, highlights and hope: Shattering the U.S. infant mortality glass ceiling. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This website contains an audiorecording and presentation slides from a webinar held on June 17, 2010, to discuss the history of U.S. efforts to reduce infant mortality and what can and should be done to eliminate remaining racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality. It describes some advances and successes in reducing infant mortality; current and emerging science, research, and vision for the future; and the role of local public health and community organizations in infant mortality reduction efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Barriers, Community role, Government role, History, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, Sociocultural factors

Solar O, Irwin A. 2010. A conceptual framework for action on the social determinants of health. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 75 pp. (Social determinants of health discussion paper 2)

Annotation: This paper describes a review of different frameworks for understanding the social determinants of health and how it was summarized and synthesized into a single conceptual framework for action. The paper also identifies elements of policy directions for action implied by the proposed conceptual framework and analysis of policy approaches.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website.

Keywords: Alienation, Community action, Discrimination, Equal opportunities, Health status, Life course, Models, Policy analysis, Policy development, Political systems, Public policy, Social values, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Theories

National Alliance to End Homelessness, National Network for Youth, Lambda Legal, National Center for Lesbian Rights. 2009. National recommended best practices for serving LGBT homeless youth. Washington, DC: National Alliance to End Homelessness, 16 pp.

Annotation: This brief presents recommendations for employees, administrators and supervisors, and youth workers in agencies and nonprofit organizations to increase their competency in working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adolescents and young adults. Recommendations for improving practices, organizational culture, and residential services are included.

Contact: National Alliance to End Homelessness, 1518 K Street, N.W., Suite 410, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-1526 Fax: (202) 638-4664 E-mail: naeh@naeh.org Web Site: http://www.endhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Competence, Homeless persons, Homosexuality, Organizational change, Program improvement, Residential programs, Sex roles, Sociocultural factors, Young adults

Martinez K, Van Buren E. 2008. Cultural and linguistic competence: Implementation guide. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 124 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides community examples, best practices, and information on specific tools and resources that can assist systems of care communities, partnering agencies, and organizations to build and promote cultural and linguistic competency (CLC). It is organized around six domains: governance and organization infrastructure, services and supports, planning and continuous quality improvements, collaboration, communication, and workforce development. Each domain contains descriptions of specific implementation strategies, examples of best practices in the field, internet links to important resources that can help leaders and practitioners design culturally and linguistically competent practices and policies, and performance indicators and measures that can be used to assess the outcomes of approaches used to actualize CLC.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Community programs, Cultural competence, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Language barriers, Model programs, Resources for professionals, Sociocultural factors

Cubbin C, Pedregon V, Egerter S, Braveman P. 2008. Where we live matters for our health: The links between neighborhoods and health. [Princeton, NJ]: Commission to Build a Healthier America, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 11 pp. (Issue brief 3, Neighborhoods and health)

Annotation: This paper examine the current state of knowledge about neighborhoods and their links with health, exploring the following questions: (1) How could neighborhoods affect health? (2) Are features of places really that important for health? (3) Do all Americans have the opportunity to live in a healthy neighborhood? and (4) Could public and private policies improve neighborhoods in ways likely to improve America's health? Several examples of joint initiatives to make neighborhoods healthier places illustrate the findings of the research.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community coordination, Community programs, Families, Housing, Neighborhoods, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors

World Health Organization, Commission on Social Determinants of Health. 2008. Closing the gap in a generation: Health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a global agenda for action to improve the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age with the aim of achieving health equity. Contents include recommendations on what can be done to promote health equity, and to foster a global movement to achieve it. Topics include improving daily living conditions; tackling the inequitable distribution of power, money, and resources; and measuring and understanding the problem and assessing the impact of action.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Equal opportunities, Health promotion, Health status, International health, Measures, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Public policy, Sociocultural factors

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.