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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (38 total).

Haugen IH. n.d.. A comparison between the social work profession and the nursing profession: Philosophy, theory and practice. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 25 pp. (Comment series no: 0-10 (34))

Carter M. n.d.. Continuing Nursing Education: Adolescents: [Final report]. Kansas City, KS: University of Kansas School of Nursing, 12 pp.

Annotation: This grant sponsored a symposium to improve adolescent approaches to health care through providing health professionals with new, innovative, and practical approaches to adolescent health care delivery. Issues addressed were: reaching the adolescent client; the application of physiological, cognitive, emotional, social, and behavioral theories to adolescent health care; and specific adolescent problems such as adolescent pregnancy and parenting, drug abuse, suicide, and body image; and sexuality in the disabled adolescent. Program emphasis was on the team and multi-disciplinary approach to effective adolescent health care delivery. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196731.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Nurses Physicians Social Workers, Professional education

New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child, Adult, and Early Intervention Services. n.d.. Sickle cell disease: Information for school personnel (3rd ed.). Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide is meant to serve as a resource for school nurses and other school personnel to alert them to the signs and symptoms of complications of the sickle cell diseases and to educate them about what to do if they encounter a child with such signs and symptoms. The guide is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) what is sickle cell disease?, (3) warning signs, (4) what is sickle cell trait? (5) complications related to sickle cell disease, (6) medical management, (7) psychosocial issues, (8) the teacher, and (9) the social workers. The guide also includes the following appendices: (1) glossary, (2) bibliography, (3) New Jersey sickle cell/hemoglobinopathies treatment centers, and (4) New Jersey genetic centers for testing and family counseling.

Keywords: Child health, Genetic counseling, Genetic disorders, Genetic services, New Jersey, Patient care management, Psychosocial factors, School health services, Sickle cell disease, Sickle cell trait, Social workers, Teachers

U.S. Office of Minority Health. 2015. Promoting healthy choices and community changes: An e-learning program for promotores de salud. Rockville, MD: U.S. Office of Minority Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This course for promotores de salud (community health workers) comprises four units about understanding healthy choices, helping people make healthy choices, understanding community change, and helping people make community change. The course can by used by individuals or by groups of individuals. Contents include a video introduction; quizzes; stories; examples; and handouts that summarize each unit including key points, definitions, and questions to consider and discuss. Users can choose to answer the questions at the end of each unit and print a certificate of completion or receive a certificate by email. The units can be completed in sequence or in any order and in whole or in part. The course is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Office of Minority Health, The Tower Building, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2882 Secondary Telephone: (240) 453-2883 Fax: (240) 453-2883 E-mail: info@minorityhealth.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.minorityhealth.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community health workers, Decision making, Health behavior, Hispanic Americans, Social change, Spanish language materials, Training

HealthConnect One. 2014. The perinatal revolution. Chicago, IL: HealthConnect One, 59 pp.

Annotation: This white paper presents expert panel recommendations for supporting community-based doula programs to improve maternal and child health in underserved birthing populations. Topics include why community-based doulas matter, history of the work, data, and case studies. Summary recommendations and next steps are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: HealthConnect One, 1436 W. Randolph, Fourth Floor, Chicago, IL 60607, Telephone: (312) 243-4772 Fax: (312) 243-4792 Web Site: http://www.healthconnectone.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Community based services, Community health workers, MCH programs, Research, Social support

Rounds K, Gallo M. 2004. Public health social work module. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, MCH Public Health - Social Work Leadership Training Program, 21 pp.

Annotation: This module is part of the Maternal and Child Health Leadership Training Program, the purpose of which is to expand and strengthen the capacity of the School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina to provide leadership education for masters-level social work students and for public health social workers in the maternal and child health field. The module presents an overview of the history and philosophy of social work and public health, discusses the roles and functions of public health social workers, explains the different levels of prevention and provides examples of possible interventions for each level of prevention by public health social workers, and examines the role of public health social work. The module includes a list of additional resources and a list of suggested activities.

Contact: MCH Public Health - Social Work Leadership Training Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Social Work, Tate-Tumer-Kuralt Building, 301 Pittsboro Street, CB 3550, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3550, Telephone: (919) 962-6429 Fax: (919) 962-0890 E-mail: mchphsw@unc.edu Web Site: http://ssw.unc.edu/mch/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Intervention, MCH training programs, Maternal health, Prevention, Public health, Social work, Social workers

Cason KL, Snyder A. 2004. The health and nutrition of Hispanic migrant and seasonal farm workers. Harrisburg, PA: Center for Rural Pennsylvania, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study of migrant and seasonal farm workers in Chester and Adams counties, Pennsylvania. Topics include how the study population is defined and characteristics of the study counties and Pennsylvania's migrant and seasonal farm workers. The study methodology is detailed and results are discussed including demographic characteristics, food choices and influences on food choices, dietary acculturation, food sufficiency practices, and nutrition education. Focus group and key informant interviews are summarized and discussion of barriers to achieving good nutrition, meeting health care needs, and participation in food assistance programs are highlighted. Additional discussion provides conclusions and policy considerations.

Contact: Center for Rural Pennsylvania, 200 North Third Street, Suite 600, Harrisburg, PA 17101, Telephone: (717) 787-9555 Fax: (717) 772-3587 E-mail: info@ruralpa.org Web Site: http://www.ruralpa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Farm workers, Health services, Hispanic Americans, Migrants, Nutrition, Pennsylvania, Rural environment, Social services

Adams G, Snyder K, Tout K. 2003. Essential but often ignored: Child care providers in the subsidy system. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 80 pp. (Assessing the new federalism occasional paper; no. 63)

Annotation: This report examines subsidy policies and practices that can shape the experiences of child care providers serving subsidized children and highlighting the variation in those policies across sites. Data was gathered and analyzed from subsidy agency administrators, key child care caseworkers, parents, and providers in 17 sites across 12 states in 1999 as part of the Urban Institute's Assessing the New Federalism case study project. Topics include pay amounts, from whom the payments are received, how timely and reliable the payments are, and other factors that shape interactions with the subsidy system. Appendices include the study methodology, provider focus group participants, and a study of payments in three scenarios. Notes and references conclude the report.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care services, Child care workers, Financial support, Low income groups, Program evaluation, Social policy, Working parents

Crosson-Tower C. 2003. The role of educators in preventing and responding to child abuse and neglect. Washington, DC: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, 80 pp. (Child abuse and neglect user manual series)

Annotation: This manual is one in a series of manuals that provide guidance on child protection for multidisciplinary professionals and community members. This manual examines the roles that teachers, school counselors, school social workers, school nurses, special education professionals, administrators, and other school personnel have in helping maltreated children. Topics include (1) identifying reasons why educators are concerned about child abuse and neglect; (2) recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect; (3) what schools can offer to provide support after the report; and (4) programs and individual actions to prevent child abuse and neglect. The manual includes six appendices that contain a glossary, resource lists, an educators' checklist for recognizing possible child maltreatment, a sample list of contacts for reporting suspected cases of child abuse and neglect, and a sample report of suspected child abuse and neglect.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Communities, Counselors, Health care, Intervention, Mental health, Role, School nurses, School personnel, Social workers, Special education, Teachers

Iwaishi L, Taba S, Howard-Jones A, Brockman D, Yamashita L, Ambrose A. 1998. Training on family-centered interprofessional collaboration: A manual for pediatric residents. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 165 pp.

Annotation: This training manual, designed for pediatric residents and other graduate students in helping professions, promotes the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required for providing family-centered services, specifically through interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of the training is to make participants aware of the positive value of family-centered, collaborative care and of professionals' role in providing such care. The concepts contained in the manual derive from two major schools of thought with regard to serving families: (1) family-centered care is the most effective care because families have opportunities to participate in decisions about their child's health care and education and (2) interprofessional collaboration recognizes that professionals interdependently—rather than independently—meet the multiple priorities and diverse needs of families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Contact Phone: (808) 536-7702 Ext. 2224 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Families, Family centered services, Graduate education, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Internship and residency, Manuals, Nurses, Pediatricians, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Social workers, Special education, Students, Teachers, Training

Kelly-Lewis J, ed. 1997. Change and challenge: MCH social workers make the difference. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina, College of Social Work, 116 pp.

Annotation: This conference aimed to provide continuing education to social workers and social work students. It focused on perspectives into MCH social work practice. The main topics were preventing violence in the community, innovative approaches to the changes in financing and delivery of care, becoming a supervisor, family preservation, and psychosocial challenges in serving women and children infected with HIV. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHJ094.

Keywords: Child welfare, Family preservation, HIV infected patients, Health care reform, MCH programs, Management, Public health, Social services, Social work, Social workers, Violence prevention

Iwaishi L, Taba S, Howard-Jones A, Brockman D, Ambrose A. 1997. Training on family-centered interprofessional collaboration: Facilitator's manual (Draft). Honolulu, HI: Health and Education Collaboration Project, Hawaii Medical Association, 157 pp.

Annotation: This training manual, designed for pediatric residents and other graduate students in helping professions, promotes the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required for providing family-centered services, specifically through interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of the training is to make participants aware of the positive value of family-centered, collaborative care and of professionals' role in providing such care. The concepts contained in the manual derive from two major schools of thought with regard to serving families: (1) family-centered care is the most effective care because families have opportunities to participate in decisions about their child's health care and education and (2) interprofessional collaboration recognizes that professionals interdependently—rather than independently—meet the multiple priorities and diverse needs of families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Out of print.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Families, Family centered services, Graduate education, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Internship and residency, Manuals, Nurses, Pediatricians, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Social workers, Special education, Students, Teachers, Training

Jaros KJ, ed. 1994. Public health social workers in a changing health systems environment: Building skills for leadership. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh, Graduate School of Public Health, Public Health Social Work Training Program, 67 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings contain the texts of presentations made at the 1993 Annual Public Health Social Work Maternal and Child Health Institute held in Pittsburgh on April 25-28, 1993. The Institute focused on the challenge social workers face within the changing public health environment in the 1990s and how they can participate in the reform of the public health agencies whether at the local, state, or national level. The volume contains the key note address which emphasized the role of prevention, assurance, and advocacy within social work; summaries of two skill building workshops on community health assessment and cultural diversity; and two summary papers that focused on continuing education opportunities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHH053.

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Leadership, National health care reform, Professional education, Public health services, Social work, Social workers, State health care reform

Von Rembow D, Sciarillo W, eds. 1993. Nurses, physicians, psychologists, and social workers within statewide early intervention systems: Clarifying roles under Part H of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Bethesda, MD: Association for the Care of Children's Health, 59 pp.

Annotation: This publication consists of papers defining certain discipline-specific roles in the early intervention system under Part H of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), including those of nurses, physicians, psychologists, and social workers. These resource papers include sections related to child find, evaluation and assessment, Individualized Family Service Plan, early intervention services, and service coordination. The papers addressing the role of the nurse and the papers discussing the role of the physician differentiate between medical, nursing, and health services. Although the papers were developed to assist Maryland's local jurisdictions in implementing the statewide early intervention system consistent with federal and state regulations, they provide both a general framework and specific guidance relevant to other areas' early intervention efforts.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Early intervention programs, Federal legislation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Infants with special health care needs, Maryland, Nurses, Part H, Physicians, Psychologists, Role, Social workers, State initiatives

Morton CJ, Wilkinson D, Patterson D, eds. 1993. Promoting family health in the 1990's: Strategies for public health social work. Berkeley, CA: University of California at Berkeley, Maternal and Child Health Program, 223 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings include papers based on presentations at the 1990 Public Health Social Work Institute which focused on family health. The papers address social and health issues that affect family health in the 1990s and examine the role of social workers in identifying, preventing and alleviating them. The proceedings include 18 papers by different authors that are grouped in the following broad categories: primary care and MCH programs, perinatal health and dependency, child health, adolescent health, and family health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHH062.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Family health, Family life, Family relations, Maternal health, Public health programs, Public health services, Social workers

McDonald TP, Donner R, Gregoire T, Poertner J, Early T. 1993. Family caregiving for children with a serious emotional disability: Phase one technical report. Portland, OR: Portland State University, Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, 143 pp.

Annotation: This report examines factors influencing the functioning of families with children having a serious emotional disability, describing which families are most vulnerable, identifying unmet service needs, and proposing responsive strategies. It is based on a survey of families with children with emotional disabilities. Potential audiences include parents, educators, researchers, and professionals working with children. A literature review on how families respond to a child's chronic illness or disability is included. The survey and findings are included in the appendix.

Contact: Research and Training Center on Family Support and Children's Mental Health, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751, Telephone: (503) 725-4040 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (503) 725-4180 E-mail: janetw@pdx.edu Web Site: http://www.rtc.pdx.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Affective disorders, Children with developmental disabilities, Families, Parents, Social workers, Special education

Morton CJ, Wilkinson D, Patterson D. 1991. Children at risk: Challenges for public health social work. Berkeley, CA: University of California at Berkeley, Maternal and Child Health Program, 159 pp.

Annotation: These proceedings present papers submitted to the 1989 Public Health Social Work Institute, a continuing education program for social workers in maternal and child health services. Within the framework of the 1989 institute's theme, Children at Risk, participants and speakers discussed issues such as prevention, policy legislation and advocacy, use of data in needs assessment, program models, and ethical decisionmaking. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHF019.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Drug affected infants, Injury prevention, Professional ethics, Public health programs, Public health services, Social workers

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 199?-. ASTHO access brief. Washington, DC: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, irregular.

Annotation: These access briefs are part of a series that analyzes and synthesizes prevailing issues in three areas: children's health insurance implementation, maternal and child health, and for-profit conversions. Number 2, which deals with children's health insurance, discusses resources on innovative school-related programs. Number 4 is an outreach and enrollment overview. Number 5 discusses outstationed eligibility workers and innovative programs. Number 6 discusses minimizing welfare stigma and facilitating enrollment. Number 7 discusses ensuring access and developing the capacity of primary care systems. Number 8 discusses quality and performance measurement. On for-profit conversions, the August 1998 issue provides examples of activities of public health–related foundations.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Enrollment, Outreach, Social Security Act, Title XXI, Social workers, State Children's Health Insurance Program

Columbia University School of Social Work and Affiliated Maternal and Child Health Field Settings. 1988. Health care practice today: The social worker as educator. New York, NY: Columbia University, School of Social Work, 58 pp.

Annotation: The proceedings of this 1988 conference on the social worker as an educator in health care practice today summarizes five workshop sessions. Topics include the social worker as AIDS educator, and group services to pregnant and parenting adolescents and their families. Implications for social work curriculum which arose from the workshop discussions are presented.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCH097.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent pregnancy, Disease prevention, Educational programs, Patient education, Social workers

Rauch J. 1988. Genetic content for graduate social work education: Human behavior and the social environment. Washington, DC: Council on Social Work Education, 180 pp. (CWSE series in genetics; no. 2)

Annotation: The Council on Social Work Education, with support from the Office of Maternal and Child Health, has produced the second volume in its series on Genetic Content for Graduate Social Work Education. This book provides resources to enable schools of social work faculty to integrate genetics content into existing curricula on human behavior in the social environment. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Genetics education, Social workers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.