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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (76 total).

Pittsburgh/Allegheny County Healthy Start. n.d.. Guidebook for healthy mothers, children, families. Pittsburgh, PA: Allegheny County Healthy Start Project, 70 pp.

Annotation: This directory lists a variety of programs and services in the Pittsburgh area that are available to mothers, children, and families. It also contains health tips and fact sheets for infant care. Topics include the following: 1) child health clinics; 2) dental health; 3) family health services; 4) family/home-based support services; 5) family planning services; 6) family support centers; 7) grief support; 8) health and safety programs; and 9) Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Pittsburgh/Allegheny & Fayette County Healthy Start, 400 North Lexington Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA Telephone: (412) 247-1000 Secondary Telephone: (412) 247-4009 Contact Phone: (412) 578-8003 Fax: (412) 578-8325 Contact E-mail: 104626@compuserv.com Web Site: http://healthystartpittsburgh.org/ Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Case management, Child care services, Community programs, Family centered services, Family planning, Family support services, Infant health, Outreach, Pittsburgh Healthy Start, Social services

District of Columbia Healthy Start Project. n.d.. Male Outreach Worker (MOW) case management protocol. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, 17 pp.

Annotation: This document gives an overview of the Male Outreach Worker (MOW) program in Washington DC. This program addresses the needs of fathers of infants in the Healthy Start program so that they may contribute positively in the health and well-being of the mother and baby. The document describes process objectives of the program, population characteristics that demonstrate the need for the MOW program, MOW staff responsibilities, recruitment, intervention design, case management, support/curriculum group activities, and MOW and MOW supervisor professional development. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, Office of Maternal and Child Health, St. Elizabeth's Campus, Cottage Seven, 2700 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20032, Telephone: (202) 645-4174 Fax: (202) 645-5084 Available at no charge.

Keywords: Case management, District of Columbia, Family support services, Fathers, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Outreach, Prevention programs, Protocols, Social services

Roche MK, Blank M, Jacobson R. 2017. Community schools: A whole-child framework for school improvement. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 26 pp.

Annotation: This paper proposes community schools as a strategy for school improvement. Topics include what a community school looks like at the school level, how community schools support provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act, and how states can support community schools. Information about community school and initiative exemplars, resources, and partners are included.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Coalitions, Collaboration, Community coordination, Community participation, Equal opportunities, Families, Learning, Models, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, Relationships, School districts, Schools, Service integration, Social support, Systems development

Pinderhughes H, Davis RA, Williams M. 2016. Adverse community experiences and resilience: A framework for addressing and preventing community trauma. Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 34 pp., exec. summ (6 pp.)

Annotation: This paper explores trauma at the population level and how it impacts efforts to prevent violence and improve other aspects of community health. The paper also presents a framework for addressing and preventing trauma at the community level. Topics include the community environment, the production of trauma from violence, community strategies to address community violence, elements of a resilient community, and promoting community resilience.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Culturally competent services, Economic factors, Emotional trauma, Geographic factors, Health promotion, Models, Prevention programs, Resilience, Social conditions, Social support, Sociocultural factors, Standards, Trauma, Trauma care, Violence prevention

Way N. 2016. The crisis of connection for adolescent boys. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1 video. (34 min.). (TAG Talks video series)

Annotation: This video provides information about increasing isolation among adolescent males as they move from childhood to adolescence and how social connections affect health and well-being. The video encourages adults to rethink assumptions and provides strategies to encourage the friendships that help adolescent boys thrive. Supplemental materials, including a discussion guide for professionals and family members, are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent males, Psychosocial development, Social support

Coalition for Community Schools, Communities in Schools, Strive Together. 2016. Aligning networks to enable every student to thrive. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document describes progress toward educational equity and opportunities to achieve shared goals by aligning assets and expertise across networks, school districts, and communities. Contents include a unifying concept of student-centered education and five principles for driving the work. Topics include trusting relationships, cross-sector partnerships, purposeful engagement, actionable data, and shared accountability.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Collaboration, Community action, Data, Education, Equal opportunities, Ethnic groups, Networking, Policy development, Poverty, Public private partnerships, Race, Social support, Trust

Truong Q. 2016. Place matters: Perceived neighborhood safety and social support during childhood and its impact on mental health in Philadelphia–A GIS analysis of children's population health needs and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center and the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, 34 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of children's population health needs and resources in Philadelphia. Contents include findings from statistical and spatial (mapping) analyses to better understand the effects of modifiable neighborhood characteristics on mental health and a proposed method for using population-level risk factors to assess service need and adequacy of community resources.

Contact: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Web Site: http://www.scattergoodfoundation.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Labeling, Mental disorders, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Research methodology, Risk factors, Social support, Trust

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2015–. Parent engagement. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to assist parents and school staff in working together to support and improve the learning, development, and health of children and adolescents. Contents include fact sheets for school districts and school administrators, teachers and other school staff, and parents and families. A strategy guide for state and local education agencies on selecting and implementing parent engagement strategies specific to HIV/STD prevention and a facilitator's guide for staff development are also included.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Child development, Child health, Family support, Health behavior, Learning, Parents, Protective factors, School age children, School districts, School personnel, Schools, Social support, Students, Teachers

Brega AG, Barnard J, Mabachi NM, Weiss BD, DeWalt DA, Brach C, Cifuentes M, Albright K, West DR. 2015. Health literacy universal precautions toolkit (2nd ed.). Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 164 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides guidance to support primary care practices in addressing health literacy. Contents include 21 tools addressing the following 4 domains: spoken communication, written communication, self-management and empowerment, and supportive systems. Additional contents include resources such as sample forms, PowerPoint presentations, and worksheets that practices may use or revise to suit their needs. A companion guide presents advice based on the implementation experiences of diverse primary care practices.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Publication no. 15-0023-EF.

Keywords: Communication, Empowerment, Forms, Health care systems, Health literacy, Patient care, Primary care, Resources for professionals, Self care, Social support

Levi J, Segal LM, Rayburn J, Martin A, Miller AF. 2015. A healthy early childhood action plan: Policies for a lifetime of well-being. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 143 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an analysis of the status of early childhood policies and outlines recommendations for a public health approach to child development. Topics include integrating health and other social support including accountable health communities for children; promoting protective, healthy communities and establishing expert and technical assistance backbone support to help spread and scale programs in every state; and increasing investments in core, effective early childhood policies and programs.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Child development, Child health, Collaboration, Community action, Financing, Health promotion, Model programs, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Protective factors, Public private partnerships, Service integration, Social support, State programs, Strategic plans, Young children

Institute of Medicine, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. 2015. Supporting family and community investments in young children globally: Workshop in brief. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes a workshop held on July 27–29, 2015, to examine topics related to supporting family and community investments in young children globally. Topics include discussions among participating researchers, policymakers, program practitioners, funders, young influencers, and other experts from 19 countries about how best to support family and community investments across areas of health, education, nutrition, social protection, and other service domains.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-38088.

Keywords: Child protective services, Education, Family support services, Financial support, Health services, International health, Nutrition services, Social support services, Young children

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

Poirier JM, Fisher SK, Hunt RA, Bearse M. 2014. A guide for understanding, supporting, and affirming LGBTQI2-S children, youth, and families. Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, 7 pp.

Annotation: This resource provides general information for service providers, educators, allies, and community members who seek to support the health and well-being of children and youth who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning, intersex, and/or two-spirit (LGBTQI2-S) and their families.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Children, Cultural competence, Educational materials, Families, Homosexuality, Sexuality, Social support, Systems of care, Youth

World Health Organization. 2014. Health for the world's adolescents: A second chance for the second decade. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, exec. summ. (14 pp.).

Annotation: This online multimedia report provides an overview of the progress made between the World Health Assembly Resolution on the Health of Youth in 1989 and the 2011 World Health Assembly Resolution on Youth and Health Risks. It includes World Health Organization recommendations on policies and programs that respond to priority health problems during adolescence, and reflects achievements in developing the evidence base for action. Topics include access to information, opportunities to develop life skills, health services, safe and supportive environments, and participation in programming.

Contact: World Health Organization, Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland Telephone: +4122 791 3281 Fax: +4122 791 4853 E-mail: mncah@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Adolescents, Health services, Information sources, International health, International programs, International services, Life skills, Multimedia, Participation, Safety, Social support

Hynes M. 2014. Don't call them dropouts: Understanding the experiences of young people who leave high school before graduation. Washington, DC: America's Promise Alliance, 71 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from interviews and surveys of young people across the United States about what leads to leaving school before graduation. Contents include findings on the relationship between interrupted enrollment and family violence and abuse; school safety; violence in the neighborhood; personal and family health challenges; unsupportive or unresponsive school policies; family abandonment (death, incarceration, other events); family absence; instability of place (residential mobility, school mobility, homelessness); school salience; peer influence and support; and school and community support.

Contact: America's Promise Alliance, 1101 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0600 Fax: (202) 657-0601 E-mail: info@americaspromise.org Web Site: http://www.americaspromise.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescents, Adverse effects, Educational attainment, Graduation, Life course, National surveys, Resilience, Risk factors, School attendance, School dropouts, School failure, Social support, Supported employment

Lombardi J, Mosle A, Patel N, Schumacher R, Stedron J. 2014. Gateways to two generations: The potential for early childhood programs and partnerships to support children and parents together. Washington, DC: Aspen Institute, Ascend, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document explores the two-generation framework, which focuses on creating opportunities for and meeting the needs of vulnerable children and their parents together, and the potential that early childhood development programs have to be gateways for two-generation approaches. Topics include the core components of two-generation approaches (economic supports, education, and social capital); a history of engaging parents in early childhood; the progression of thinking about parents in early childhood development; two-generation approaches in early childhood programs; and state- and community-level initiatives.

Contact: Aspen Institute, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036-1133, Telephone: (202) 736-5800 Fax: (202) 467-0790 Web Site: http://www.aspeninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Economic factors, Education factors, History, Intergenerational programs, Local initiatives, Models, Social change, Social factors, Social support, State programs, Young children

HealthConnect One. 2014. The perinatal revolution. Chicago, IL: HealthConnect One, 59 pp.

Annotation: This white paper presents expert panel recommendations for supporting community-based doula programs to improve maternal and child health in underserved birthing populations. Topics include why community-based doulas matter, history of the work, data, and case studies. Summary recommendations and next steps are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: HealthConnect One, 1436 W. Randolph, Fourth Floor, Chicago, IL 60607, Telephone: (312) 243-4772 Fax: (312) 243-4792 Web Site: http://www.healthconnectone.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Community based services, Community health workers, MCH programs, Research, Social support

Jones CA. 2014. Uplifting the whole child: Using wraparound services to overcome social barriers to learning. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center; Cambridge, MA: Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy, 17 pp. (Roadmap to expanding opportunity: Evidence on what works in education)

Annotation: This paper describes wraparound services (defined as student and family supports integrated with and often delivered in schools) to address social and non-academic barriers to student learning. Contents include background, a summary of three case studies (in New York City, Tulsa, and California Healthy Start), five key features of a high-quality wraparound services model that could be implemented across Massachusetts, and a statewide cost projection. The report concludes with a discussion of policy considerations.

Contact: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 426-1228 Web Site: http://www.massbudget.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Costs, Educational reform, Family support services, Health services delivery, Learning, Local initiatives, Massachusetts, Policy development, Program models, Service integration, Social factors, State initiatives, Students

Blackorby J. 2014. Unconditional education: Evaluation highlights for Seneca Family of Agencies' Investing in Innovation (i3) grant. Oakland, CA: Seneca Family of Agencies, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document highlights results from a grant-funded program to support implementation and evaluation of the Unconditional Education (UE) model. The UE model promotes a multi-tiered framework that integrates academic, behavioral, and social emotional supports for students, while explicitly addressing and improving the overall school culture and climate for the entire school community. Contents include outcomes for all students and for students in special education, African American students, Latino students, and English language learners. Data from a supplemental evaluation for students with disabilities are also included.

Contact: SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493, Telephone: (650) 859-2000 Web Site: https://www.sri.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Discipline, Low income groups, Mental health, Models, Program development, Program evaluation, School attendance, Social support, Special education, Students

Lorenzo SB, Pickett OK. 2013–. Maternal distress in the perinatal period and child outcomes: Knowledge path (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path is a guide to resources about sources of stress that pregnant women and new mothers experience and the impact of maternal distress on the developing fetus and young child. Topics include policies, programs, and practices that enhance a woman's ability to cope with stress, provide social and emotional support for pregnant women and new mothers, and build protective factors in new families. The knowledge path is aimed at health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, and researchers. A separate brief lists resources for families. The knowledge path is updated periodically. [Funded by the O'Neill Foundation]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Child health, Electronic publications, Families, Knowledge paths, Mental health, Parenting, Postpartum care, Pregnant women, Social support, Stress, Stress management: Infant health, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.