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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (229 total).

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child, Adult, and Early Intervention Services. n.d.. Sickle cell disease: Information for school personnel (3rd ed.). Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, Special Child Health and Early Intervention Services, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide is meant to serve as a resource for school nurses and other school personnel to alert them to the signs and symptoms of complications of the sickle cell diseases and to educate them about what to do if they encounter a child with such signs and symptoms. The guide is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) what is sickle cell disease?, (3) warning signs, (4) what is sickle cell trait? (5) complications related to sickle cell disease, (6) medical management, (7) psychosocial issues, (8) the teacher, and (9) the social workers. The guide also includes the following appendices: (1) glossary, (2) bibliography, (3) New Jersey sickle cell/hemoglobinopathies treatment centers, and (4) New Jersey genetic centers for testing and family counseling.

Keywords: Child health, Genetic counseling, Genetic disorders, Genetic services, New Jersey, Patient care management, Psychosocial factors, School health services, Sickle cell disease, Sickle cell trait, Social workers, Teachers

O'Connor C. 2017. Working toward well-being: Community approaches to toxic stress. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, Early Childhood LINC Learning Lab on Community Approaches to Toxic Stress, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief defines toxic stress from a community perspective and presents a framework for a community approach to addressing toxic stress, nested within the broader context of working toward healthy development and well-being. The brief also provides examples of how communities are taking action and recommendations for next steps to promote and further develop comprehensive approaches to toxic stress in communities across the country. Strategies for parents and caregivers; service providers; and multisystem, community partners and policymakers are included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Communication, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Community role, Coordination, Early childhood, Families, Health education, Leadership, Models, Organizational change, Parents, Policy development, Protective factors, Social change, Stress, Systems development, Young children

Pinderhughes H, Davis RA, Williams M. 2016. Adverse community experiences and resilience: A framework for addressing and preventing community trauma. Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 34 pp., exec. summ (6 pp.)

Annotation: This paper explores trauma at the population level and how it impacts efforts to prevent violence and improve other aspects of community health. The paper also presents a framework for addressing and preventing trauma at the community level. Topics include the community environment, the production of trauma from violence, community strategies to address community violence, elements of a resilient community, and promoting community resilience.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Culturally competent services, Economic factors, Emotional trauma, Geographic factors, Health promotion, Models, Prevention programs, Resilience, Social conditions, Social support, Sociocultural factors, Standards, Trauma, Trauma care, Violence prevention

Truong Q. 2016. Place matters: Perceived neighborhood safety and social support during childhood and its impact on mental health in Philadelphia–A GIS analysis of children's population health needs and resources. Philadelphia, PA: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center and the City of Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbility Services, 34 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.)

Annotation: This report presents an analysis of children's population health needs and resources in Philadelphia. Contents include findings from statistical and spatial (mapping) analyses to better understand the effects of modifiable neighborhood characteristics on mental health and a proposed method for using population-level risk factors to assess service need and adequacy of community resources.

Contact: Thomas Scattergood Behavioral Health Foundation at Friends Center, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Web Site: http://www.scattergoodfoundation.org Out of print.

Keywords: Access to care, Children, Cultural sensitivity, Geographic factors, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Labeling, Mental disorders, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Research methodology, Risk factors, Social support, Trust

American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health. 2015. Fluoridation toolkit: A resource for health advocates. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit for advocates provides resources for educating communities about community water fluoridation. Contents include sample blog posts, a memo for newspaper editors, letters to the editor, tips for talking to reporters, remarks to help parents and health professionals talk to city council or local board members, a resolution observing community water fluoridation's 70th anniversary, and social media messages. A user's guide is included.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 E-mail: fluoride@aap.org Web Site: http://www.ilikemyteeth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Community based services, Fluorides, Mass media, Oral health, Preventive health services, Social media, Water

Institute of Medicine, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. 2015. Supporting family and community investments in young children globally: Workshop in brief. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes a workshop held on July 27–29, 2015, to examine topics related to supporting family and community investments in young children globally. Topics include discussions among participating researchers, policymakers, program practitioners, funders, young influencers, and other experts from 19 countries about how best to support family and community investments across areas of health, education, nutrition, social protection, and other service domains.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-38088.

Keywords: Child protective services, Education, Family support services, Financial support, Health services, International health, Nutrition services, Social support services, Young children

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Family resource brief (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

World Health Organization. 2014. Health for the world's adolescents: A second chance for the second decade. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization, exec. summ. (14 pp.).

Annotation: This online multimedia report provides an overview of the progress made between the World Health Assembly Resolution on the Health of Youth in 1989 and the 2011 World Health Assembly Resolution on Youth and Health Risks. It includes World Health Organization recommendations on policies and programs that respond to priority health problems during adolescence, and reflects achievements in developing the evidence base for action. Topics include access to information, opportunities to develop life skills, health services, safe and supportive environments, and participation in programming.

Contact: World Health Organization, Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health, 20 Avenue Appia, 1211 Geneva 27, Switzerland Telephone: +4122 791 3281 Fax: +4122 791 4853 E-mail: mncah@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/maternal_child_adolescent Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Adolescents, Health services, Information sources, International health, International programs, International services, Life skills, Multimedia, Participation, Safety, Social support

HealthConnect One. 2014. The perinatal revolution. Chicago, IL: HealthConnect One, 59 pp.

Annotation: This white paper presents expert panel recommendations for supporting community-based doula programs to improve maternal and child health in underserved birthing populations. Topics include why community-based doulas matter, history of the work, data, and case studies. Summary recommendations and next steps are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: HealthConnect One, 1436 W. Randolph, Fourth Floor, Chicago, IL 60607, Telephone: (312) 243-4772 Fax: (312) 243-4792 Web Site: http://www.healthconnectone.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Childbirth, Community based services, Community health workers, MCH programs, Research, Social support

Jones CA. 2014. Uplifting the whole child: Using wraparound services to overcome social barriers to learning. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center; Cambridge, MA: Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy, 17 pp. (Roadmap to expanding opportunity: Evidence on what works in education)

Annotation: This paper describes wraparound services (defined as student and family supports integrated with and often delivered in schools) to address social and non-academic barriers to student learning. Contents include background, a summary of three case studies (in New York City, Tulsa, and California Healthy Start), five key features of a high-quality wraparound services model that could be implemented across Massachusetts, and a statewide cost projection. The report concludes with a discussion of policy considerations.

Contact: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 426-1228 Web Site: http://www.massbudget.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Costs, Educational reform, Family support services, Health services delivery, Learning, Local initiatives, Massachusetts, Policy development, Program models, Service integration, Social factors, State initiatives, Students

McGinnis T, Crawford M, Somers SA. 2014. A state policy framework for integrating health and social services. New York, NY: The Commonwealth Fund,

Annotation: This issue brief describes three essential components for integrating health, including physical and behavioral health services and public health, and social services: (1) a coordinating mechanism, (2) quality measurement and data-sharing tools, and (3) aligned financing and payment. It also presents a five-step policy framework to help states move beyond isolated pilot efforts and establish the infrastructure necessary to support ongoing integration of health and social services, particularly for Medicaid beneficiaries.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Financing, Health services, Measures, Medicaid, Policy development, Program coordination, Public health infrastructure, Reimbursement, Service integration, Social services

Johnston J and Stratus. 2013. Putting children first: Scenarios for the future of children's health and well being in the U.S.. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 35 pp. (Report)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the process by which scenarios about the future of children's health and well-being were created for a forum of philanthropists and children' health experts held in Aspen, CO, in July 2012. The report shares the scenarios, which paint four different portraits of how the state of children's health and well-being could evolve over the next several decades. The report also shares insights and implications that emerged from participants' interactions with the scenarios at the forum, as well as how these scenarious might be used to empower new actions and strategies for transforming the future of children's health and well-being.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child development, Child health, Economic factors, Educational factors, Families, Family support services, Health services, Low income groups, Social factors, Social services, Trends

Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange. 2013. Guidelines for testing and reporting drug exposed newborns in Washington state. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to hospitals, health care providers and affiliated professionals about maternal drug screening, laboratory testing, and reporting of drug-exposed newborns delivered in Washington State. Contents include indicators for testing, hospital policy, newborn and maternal risk indicators, consent issues for testing, newborn drug testing, management of a newborn with positive drug toxicology, and reporting to Children's Administration. Appendices include references and resources, guidelines for obtaining consent, a sample letter, neonatal abstinence syndrome scoring system, and information on Washington's Children's Administration prenatal substance abuse policy.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Guidelines, Hospital services, Infant health, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, State initiatives, State social service agencies, Substance abusing pregnant women, Substance use screening, Washington

Michalopoulos C, Duggan A, Knox V, Filene JH, Lee H, Snell EK, Crowne S, Lunquist E, Corso PS, Ingels JB. 2013. Revised design for the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program evaluation. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 101 pp. (OPRE report 2013-18)

Annotation: This report describes plans for a national evaluation of the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program (MIHOPE), a program launched in 2011 by the Administration for Children and Families and the Health Resources and Services Administration within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Contents include an overview, background on home visiting and goals for the evaluation, an overview of the proposed evaluation design, a sampling plan for the evaluation, the implementation study, the impact analysis and analysis of health systems outcomes, and the economic evaluation.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Costs, Families, Family support services, Federal programs, Health systems, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Program evaluation, Social services, Women's health

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

American Institutes for Research. 2013. Improving emotional and behavioral outcomes for LGBT children/youth: A strategic planning tool (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research, 8 pp.

Annotation: This strategic-planning tool is intended to help support efforts of those working in organizations and communities to identify action to improve services and supports for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) children and adolescents and their families. The tool includes a table organized around 10 standards of care that provide a framework for improving outcomes and well-being of LGBT children and adolescents. The standards include (1) assessment and continuous quality improvement, (2) nondscrimination policies, (3) staff knowledge and development, (4) documentation, data collection, and information sharing, (5) safe, supportive environments, (6) practices that affirm identity, (7) healthy and supportive peer connections, (8) family connections, (9) access to affirming services and supports, and (10) community outreach and engagement.

Contact: American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 944-5400 Secondary Telephone: (877) 334-3499 Fax: (202) 403-5454 E-mail: center@air.org Web Site: http://www.air.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Adolescents, Communities, Data, Families, Family support services, Homosexuality, Outreach, Peer support programs, Public policy, Quality assurance, Social support, social services

Children's Hospital Association. 2013. Optimizing health care for children with medical complexity. Alexandria, VA: Children's Hospital Association, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on the special needs of children with medical complexity. The report discusses the medically complex pediatric population and the care coordination, services, and intervention these children require; challenges to changing care; solutions; and a foundation for reform. A number of children with different types of medical complexity are described within the report.

Contact: Children's Hospital Association, 600 13th Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 753-5500 Web Site: http://www.childrenshospitals.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Case studies, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Costs, Family support services, Health insurance, Health services, Infants with special health care needs, Intervention, Medicare, Service coordination, Social services

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.