Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Early Childhood Data Collaborative. 2014. 2013 state of states' early childhood data systems. Bethesda, MD: Early Childhood Data Collaborative, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey to assess state early childhood data systems. The report focuses on state data systems' ability to securely link child-level early childhood education (ECE) data across ECE programs and to K-12, health, and social services data systems. Topics include states collecting state-level developmental screening, assessment, and kindergarten entry assessments; status of state ECE data governance structure, authority, and function; and action steps for policymakers and practitioners.

Contact: Early Childhood Data Collaborative, c/o Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9329 E-mail: info@ecedata.org Web Site: http://www.ecedata.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data linkage, Early childhood education, Health agencies, Integrated information systems, National surveys, School systems, Social service agencies, State programs

Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange. 2013. Guidelines for testing and reporting drug exposed newborns in Washington state. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Health, Health Education Resource Exchange, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance to hospitals, health care providers and affiliated professionals about maternal drug screening, laboratory testing, and reporting of drug-exposed newborns delivered in Washington State. Contents include indicators for testing, hospital policy, newborn and maternal risk indicators, consent issues for testing, newborn drug testing, management of a newborn with positive drug toxicology, and reporting to Children's Administration. Appendices include references and resources, guidelines for obtaining consent, a sample letter, neonatal abstinence syndrome scoring system, and information on Washington's Children's Administration prenatal substance abuse policy.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Drug use during pregnancy, Guidelines, Hospital services, Infant health, Neonatal abstinence syndrome, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, State initiatives, State social service agencies, Substance abusing pregnant women, Substance use screening, Washington

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families . 2012. Promoting social and emotional well-being for children and youth receiving child welfare services. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , 21 pp.

Annotation: This information memorandum for state, tribal, and territorial agencies administering or supervising the administration of Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act, Indian Tribes and Indian Tribal Organizations, seeks to promote social and emotional well-bring for children and adolescents who have experienced maltreatment and are receiving child welfare services. The memorandum includes an overview of the issue and a discussion of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families' well-being framework, emerging evidence on the impact of maltreatment, requirements and policy opportunities, current state and county investments, screening and functional assessment, effective interventions, and maximizing resources to achieve better results.

Contact: U.S. Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: Secondary Telephone: Fax: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/acyf Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, American Indians, Child development, Child maltreatment, Child mental health, Child welfare, Child welfare agencies, Intervention, Legislation, Public policy, Screening, Social service agencies, State agencies

Greenbook National Evaluation Team. 2008. The Greenbook Initiative: Final evaluation report. [Washington, DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 68 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final evaluation report assesses the extent to which Greenbook implementation activities facilitated cross-system and within-system change and practice in the child welfare agencies, dependency courts, and domestic violence service providers. The Greenbook provides principles and recommendations to guide communities and these three primary systems on how to respond to families experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Hubert H. Humphrey Building, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 415 F, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://aspe.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Social services, Child abuse, Child welfare agencies, Courts, Domestic violence, Maltreated children, Program evaluation

Maloney T, Jurica J. 2005. Improving child find services in rural communities: How to create a public awareness and child find action plan through a community collaboration team. Missoula, MT: Rural Institute on Disabilities, University of Montana, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes a process intended to help agencies determine who are the key players in a rural community and to collaborate with them to develop an effective public awareness and child find program (i.e., programs to identify children with disabilities or who are at risk for disabilities and thus who are eligible for services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)) for the community. The manual is divided into nine sections. Section 1 is an introduction. Section 2 outlines what an agency and facilitator need to implement the project. Section 3 discusses objectives and expectations of the core organizing team. Section 4 provides ideas for planning and leading team meetings. Section 5 defines basic principles and elements of marketing. Section 6 emphasizes the importance of planning for evaluation and contains a variety of forms for collecting information and data. Section 7 discusses marketing strategies. Section 8 provides a list of resource materials. Section 9 includes sample formats for organizing effective team meetings.

Contact: University of Montana Rural Institute, 52 Corbin Hall, Missoula, MT 59812, Telephone: (406) 243-5467 Secondary Telephone: (800) 732-0323 Fax: (406) 243-4730 E-mail: rural@ruralinstitute.umt.edu Web Site: http://www.ruralinstitute.umt.edu

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Collaboration, Communities, Eligibility, Public agencies, Public awareness campaigns, Rural environment, Rural population, Social services

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. 1999. Blending perspectives and building common ground: A report to Congress on substance abuse and child protection. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 175 pp.

Annotation: This report on substance abuse and child protection describes: (1) the extent and scope of the problem of substance abuse in the child welfare population; (2) the types of services provided to this population; (3) the effectiveness of these services; and (4) recommendations for legislative changes that might be needed to improve service coordination. Appendices provide information on Medicaid services for substance abuse treatment, the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment comprehensive treatment model for alcohol and other drug abusing women and their children, and key federal programs that fund substance abuse and child welfare services and research.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child welfare, Collaboration, Family support, Family violence, Federal agencies, Health occupations, Intervention, Maltreated children, Prevention, Social services, Statistics, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusers, Substance use behavior

Bishop KK, Taylor MS, Arango P, eds. 1997. Partnerships at work: Lessons learned from programs and practices of families, professionals and communities. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont, 135 pp.

Annotation: This book gives information on culturally sensitive family- and community-centered care for children with special health care needs. It presents the case of a family with multiple needs and ways the family built partnerships with various providers of health care and education services. Examples of community-based programs in New Mexico, Minnesota, and Texas are given. Also included are chapters on applying lessons learned and on recommendations for implementing changes. Appendices include a suggested reading list, information on the National Commission on Leadership in Interprofessional Education, principles of family/professional collaboration, key elements of family-centered care, fundamentals of cultural competence, and a list of Project Unity members. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Vermont, Partnerships for Change, Department of Social Work, 228 Waterman Building, Burlington, VT 05405, Telephone: (802) 656-1156 Fax: (802) 656-8565 E-mail: kbishop@zoo.uvm.edu Web Site: http://www.partnershipsforchange.com/ Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHL101.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community based services, Community health services, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Family centered services, Parents with special health care needs, Social service agencies

Leichtman HM. 1996. Helping work environments work. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 205 pp.

Annotation: This book addresses the issues of how organizations learn and grow. The material is organized around five themes: (1) information and knowledge as the most sought after qualities of a superior social service professional; (2) the importance of multiple perspectives; (3) the inter relatedness of individuals and programs; (4) the source of substantial, sustained organizational change from within an operation; and (5) the three levels of effective leadership. Topics include the director's struggle with dependence, organizational culture, information and decision making, staff recruitment, supervision, interpersonal dynamics, group dynamics, problems and their management, and help from the outside. The book also contains a glossary and references.

Contact: Child Welfare League of America, 1726 M Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 688-4200 Fax: (202) 833-1689 Web Site: http://www.cwla.org $22.95 plus shipping and handling; no shipping and handling if prepaid. Workbook also available. Document Number: ISBN 0-87868-549-9.

Keywords: Administration, Continuing education, Information, Leadership, Mental health professionals, Organizational change, Organizations, Social service agencies, Workplace

Kretzmann JP, McKnight JL. 1993. Building communities from the inside out: A path toward finding and mobilizing a community's assets. Chicago, IL: ACTA Publications, 376 pp.

Annotation: This book shows how community groups, organizations, and local governmental agencies can work together to identify the strengths of the community and to use them to solve local problems; it relies on the idea of asset-based community development. The idea focuses on assessing the social needs of the individual families and the community as a whole and their strengths and using those assets to solve local problems. The introduction provides an overview of the concepts; subsequent chapters focus on involving individuals (including youths, seniors, persons with special health needs, and individuals with low incomes), local associations, organizations, and institutions; rebuilding the community's economy; summarizing the asset-based community development process; and outlining ways to build support for the process. A videotape training program which introduces the idea of asset-based community development is also available.

Contact: ACTA Publications, 5559 W. Howard Street, Shokie, IL 60077, Telephone: (800) 397-2282 Fax: (800) 397-0079 E-mail: acta@actapublications.com Web Site: http://www.actapublications.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87946-108-x.

Keywords: Agencies, Communities, Community organizations, Community participation, Development, Inclusion, Low income groups, Outreach, Planning, Problem solving, Senior citizens, Services, Social problems, Special health care needs, Youth

Spellman C. 1987. Early B.I.R.D.S. Project (Behavioral Identification and Referral to Developmental Services) [Final report]. Parsons, KS: University of Kansas, Parsons Research Center, Bureau of Child Research, 22 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to develop recommendations for establishing services for preschool children with handicaps. Interagency collaboration and cooperation were of special importance. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152775.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Early intervention, Family support, Preschool children, Screening tests, State social service agencies

Watkins EL, ed. 1980. Social work in a state-based system of child health care: Based on the proceedings of the 1980 Tri-Regional Workshop for Social Workers in Maternal and Child Health Services. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Public Health, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 156 pp.

Annotation: This publication presents selected papers from the 1980 Tri-Regional Workshop for Social Workers in Maternal and Child Health Services. Topics discussed are state-based child health care; developing networks in a state-based system of health care for families; social work in health programs for families, mothers, and children; essentials of social work practice in public health programs; strategies for establishing an effective social work program; recent trends in genetic programs and their implications for social workers; development of services for children with handicapping conditions; the state consultant's role in implementing a state-based system of health care; the multi-method approach to practice; neglectful families and the measurement of change resulting from social work intervention; enabling immigrants to obtain early preventive care; and research for the social work practitioner. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child health, Children with developmental disabilities, Conferences, Dysfunctional families, Genetic services, Immigrants, Maternal health, Preventive health services, Research, Social work, State health agencies

Welch KH. 1940. The meaning of state supervision in the social protection of children. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 22 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 252)

Annotation: This publication was developed to provide guidance to states in their supervision of child welfare agencies. Issues of organization, staffing, cooperative relationships with other agencies, and standards of care, and licensing are addressed. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child protective services, Guidelines, State social service agencies, State youth agencies, Supervision

Colby MR. 1933. The county as an administrative unit for social work. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 48 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 224)

Annotation: This report analyzes the activities of state departments in supporting the development of county social services. The importance of using the county as an administrative unit to adequately serve rural as well as urban areas is discussed. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: County social service agencies, Social work, Statewide planning, Supervision

Rosenberg R, Donahue AM. 1925. The welfare of infants of illegitimate birth in Baltimore: As affected by a Maryland law of 1916 governing the separation from under their mothers of children under 6 months old. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 24 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 144)

Annotation: This bulletin reports on the welfare of infants of illegitimate birth in Baltimore as affected by a Maryland law of 1916 that prohibited the separation from their mothers of children under 6 months old. The mortality rate for infants born out of wedlock in 1921 showed a reduction of more than 50 percent from the corresponding rate for 1915. It is a publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child welfare, Infant mortality, Infants, Maryland, Mother child relations, Single mothers, Social service agencies, State legislation

U.S. Children's Bureau. 1922. County organization for child care and protection. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 173 pp. (Children's Bureau publication; no. 107)

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.