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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (102 total).

O'Connor C. 2017. Working toward well-being: Community approaches to toxic stress. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy, Early Childhood LINC Learning Lab on Community Approaches to Toxic Stress, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief defines toxic stress from a community perspective and presents a framework for a community approach to addressing toxic stress, nested within the broader context of working toward healthy development and well-being. The brief also provides examples of how communities are taking action and recommendations for next steps to promote and further develop comprehensive approaches to toxic stress in communities across the country. Strategies for parents and caregivers; service providers; and multisystem, community partners and policymakers are included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Communication, Communities, Community action, Community based services, Community role, Coordination, Early childhood, Families, Health education, Leadership, Models, Organizational change, Parents, Policy development, Protective factors, Social change, Stress, Systems development, Young children

California Pan-Ethnic Health Network. 2016. Taking a bite out of oral health inequities: Promoting equitable oral health policies for communities of color. Oakland, CA: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights oral health disparities within communities of color in California. Topics include oral health disparities, the impact of oral health inequities (oral health and children, oral health and employment, and oral health and chronic conditions), and causes of oral health inequities (lack of access to affordable care, absence of a culturally and linguistically competent work force, and social and environmental inequities). It also provides policy recommendations (improve access to and quality of oral health care, ensure that there is a culturally competent work force, and engage in efforts to improve underlying socioeconomic inequities).

Contact: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 1221 Preservation Park Way, Suite 200, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 832-1160 Fax: (510) 832-1175 E-mail: info@cpehn.org Web Site: http://www.cpehn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, California, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Environmental influences, Equal opportunities, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Oral health, Policy development, Social factors, State surveys, Work force

Rivara F, Le Menestrel S, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on the Biological and Psychosocial Effects of Peer Victimization: Lessons for Bullying Prevention. 2016. Preventing bullying through science, policy, and practice. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 310 pp.

Annotation: This document reports on the state of the science on the biological and psychosocial consequences of peer victimization and the risk and protective factors that either increase or decrease peer victimization behavior and consequences. Contents include information about the scope of the problem, social contexts that can either attenuate or exacerbate the effect of individual characteristics on bullying behavior, consequences of bullying behavior, preventive interventions, law and policy, and future directions.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Peer groups, Peer pressure, Policy development, Protective factors, Risk factors, Social behavior, Violence prevention

Center for Global Policy Solutions. 2016. Overlooked but not forgotten: Social Security lifts millions more children out of poverty. Washington, DC: Center for Global Policy Solutions, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to expand existing research about Social Security's indirect role in lifting children out of poverty by examining the effect on those living in extended households. It documents how the multi-generational impact of Social Security has grown and how it has provided an important and increasing income source across different racial and ethnic groups. Policy implications are included.

Contact: Center for Global Policy Solutions, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5111 Fax: (202) 265-5118 E-mail: info@globalpolicysolutions.org Web Site: http://globalpolicysolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Ethnic factors, Family income, Federal programs, Intergenerational programs, Policy development. , Poverty, Racial factors, Social Security, Trends

Woolf SH, Aron L, Chapman DA, Dubay L, Zimerman E, Snellings LC, Hall L, Haley AD, Holla N, Ayers K, Lowenstein C, Waidmann TA. 2016. The health of the states: How U.S. states compare in health status and the factors that shape health–Summary report. Richmond, VA: Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report, and accompanying supplemental reports, present findings on the status of Americans' health at the state level, along with the diverse factors associated with health. The report examines how state-level variations in health outcomes correlate with variations in factors thought to shape or influence health (health determinants) from five domains including health behaviors, health systems, economic and social factors, physical and social environmental factors, and public policies and social spending. Contents include research and policy priorities emerging from the analysis. Maps and charts are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data analysis, Decision making, Economics, Geographic factors, Health behaviors, Health status, Health systems, Life course, Protective factors, Public policy, Risk factors, Social factors

Coalition for Community Schools, Communities in Schools, Strive Together. 2016. Aligning networks to enable every student to thrive. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document describes progress toward educational equity and opportunities to achieve shared goals by aligning assets and expertise across networks, school districts, and communities. Contents include a unifying concept of student-centered education and five principles for driving the work. Topics include trusting relationships, cross-sector partnerships, purposeful engagement, actionable data, and shared accountability.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, Coalition for Community Schools, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 X111 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: ccs@iel.org Web Site: http://www.communityschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Barriers, Collaboration, Community action, Data, Education, Equal opportunities, Ethnic groups, Networking, Policy development, Poverty, Public private partnerships, Race, Social support, Trust

Spencer A, Freda B, McGinnis T, Gottlieb L. 2016. Measuring social determinants of health among Medicaid beneficiaries: Early state lessons. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 13 pp.

Annotation: This brief explores state-based efforts to collect and use social determinants of health (SDOH) data including what data health plans and providers are required to collect. Topics include early state efforts to define SDOH and collect information; state efforts to select SDOH measures; using SDOH data at the patient and population level; challenges to collecting, sharing, and using SDOH information; and considerations for advancing SDOH measurement approaches.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Data collection, Data linkage, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Financing, Health behavior, Low income groups, Measures, Medicaid, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Reimbursement, Risk assessment, Risk factors, Service delivery systems, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors, State programs

University of Kansas, Work Group for Community Health and Development. 2015–. Community Tool Box. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas, Work Group for Community Health and Development, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides resources and tools to assist individuals and groups in working together to build healthier communities. Contents include how-to information for learning a skill, taking action, linking with others, and supporting collective impact. The website is available in English and Spanish. Topics include community assessment; communications to promote interest and participation; developing a strategic plan and organizational structure; leadership and management; analyzing community problems and designing community interventions; implementing promising community interventions; cultural competence and spirituality in community building; organizing effective advocacy; evaluating community programs and initiatives; maintaining quality and rewarding accomplishments; generating, managing, and sustaining financial resources; and social marketing and sustainability of the initiative.

Contact: University of Kansas, Work Group for Community Health and Development, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Dole Center, Room 4082, Lawrence, KS 66045-7555, Telephone: (785) 864-0533 E-mail: workgroup@ku.edu Web Site: http://communityhealth.ku.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Community participation, Community role, Databases, Model programs, Non-English-Language materials, Planning, Policy development, Problem solving, Program development, Social change, Spanish language materials, Systems development

Malvin J, Daniel S, Brindis CD. 2015. California's Confidential Health Information Act (SB 138): Implementation readiness among health insurers and health plans. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes a study to identify operational issues and solutions related to the implementation of California's Confidential Health Information Act (Senate Bill 138), a law to address the privacy concerns of individuals insured as dependents on a parent's or partner's health plan. Topics include legal gaps that led to the new legislation, findings from telephone interviews with health insurance carriers and health plans, and an analysis of website content related to privacy practices.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0410, Telephone: (415) 476-5255 Web Site: http://healthpolicy.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Confidentiality, Health insurance, Organizational change, Policy development, Social change, State legislation, Transition to independent living

Levi J, Segal LM, Rayburn J, Martin A, Miller AF. 2015. A healthy early childhood action plan: Policies for a lifetime of well-being. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 143 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an analysis of the status of early childhood policies and outlines recommendations for a public health approach to child development. Topics include integrating health and other social support including accountable health communities for children; promoting protective, healthy communities and establishing expert and technical assistance backbone support to help spread and scale programs in every state; and increasing investments in core, effective early childhood policies and programs.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Child development, Child health, Collaboration, Community action, Financing, Health promotion, Model programs, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Protective factors, Public private partnerships, Service integration, Social support, State programs, Strategic plans, Young children

National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2015. Adaptive leadership and public health. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1 video (5 min., 25 sec.).

Annotation: This video examines adaptive leadership as a practical framework for leading consequential change in the midst of significant market and sociopolitical transformation. Topics include how local health officials and their staff are exploring innovative partnerships with other agencies in health care and beyond and identifying new ways of operating within and influencing the economic and social conditions of the health system.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Community action, Health care reform, Health systems agencies, Leadership, Local health agencies, Organizational change, Policy development, Political systems, Public private partnerships, Social conditions, Socioeconomic factors, Systems development, Transitions

PolicyLink and University of Southern California, Program for Environmental and Regional Equity. 2014–. National equity atlas. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool provides data on demographic changes and racial and economic inclusion for the largest 150 regions, in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the United States as a whole. Contents include data summaries that provide a snapshot of how a community is doing on key indicators of demographic change and equity; charts, graphs, and maps; and stories about how local leaders are using equity data to catalyze conversations and implement equitable growth strategies and policies.

Contact: PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: info@policylink.org Web Site: http://www.policylink.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Community action, Cultural diversity, Data analysis, Economic factors, Equal opportunities, Geographic regions, Inclusion, Policy development, Racial factors, Social change, Statewide planning, Statistical data

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

Bouri N, Minton K, Jolani N, Rubin S. 2014. Riding the mobile wave: What local health departments need in order to adopt social media and mobile health technologies for emergency preparedness. Baltimore, MD: UPMC Center for Health Security; Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 41 pp., exec. summ. (5 pp.).

Annotation: This document reports findings from a study to determine what organizational factors local health department staff perceive as necessary to support their use of social media and mobile health technologies for emergency preparedness. Contents include the study methods, findings, and recommendations for policy and practice. Topics include in-house capacity, leadership support and policies, legal and security issues, and audiences. Case studies are also included.

Contact: UPMC Center for Health Security, 621 E. Pratt Street, Suite 210, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (443) 573-3304 Fax: (443) 573-3305 Web Site: http://www.upmchealthsecurity.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Confidentiality, Disaster planning, Health agencies, Legal issues, Local agencies, Policy analysis, Policy development, Research, Social media, Technology

Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management. 2014. diversitydatakids.org. Waltham, MA: Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, 1 v.

Annotation: This website provides information on the demographics of children and families in the United States, key factors that drive child outcomes, and issues of racial/ethnic socioeconomic equity in child health and wellbeing. Users can query, compare, and analyze data by race and ethnicity; compare data across states, metropolitan areas, counties, large cities, and large school districts; explore metropolitan area maps of the Child Opportunity Index; and obtain equity assessments of social policies affecting children. Fact sheets are also available.

Contact: Brandeis University, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, 415 South Street MS 035, Waltham, MA 02454-9110, Telephone: (781) 736-3820 Web Site: http://heller.brandeis.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Neighborhoods, Racial factors, Social policy, Socioeconomic status, Statistics

Jones CA. 2014. Uplifting the whole child: Using wraparound services to overcome social barriers to learning. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center; Cambridge, MA: Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy, 17 pp. (Roadmap to expanding opportunity: Evidence on what works in education)

Annotation: This paper describes wraparound services (defined as student and family supports integrated with and often delivered in schools) to address social and non-academic barriers to student learning. Contents include background, a summary of three case studies (in New York City, Tulsa, and California Healthy Start), five key features of a high-quality wraparound services model that could be implemented across Massachusetts, and a statewide cost projection. The report concludes with a discussion of policy considerations.

Contact: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 426-1228 Web Site: http://www.massbudget.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Costs, Educational reform, Family support services, Health services delivery, Learning, Local initiatives, Massachusetts, Policy development, Program models, Service integration, Social factors, State initiatives, Students

McGinnis T, Crawford M, Somers SA. 2014. A state policy framework for integrating health and social services. New York, NY: The Commonwealth Fund,

Annotation: This issue brief describes three essential components for integrating health, including physical and behavioral health services and public health, and social services: (1) a coordinating mechanism, (2) quality measurement and data-sharing tools, and (3) aligned financing and payment. It also presents a five-step policy framework to help states move beyond isolated pilot efforts and establish the infrastructure necessary to support ongoing integration of health and social services, particularly for Medicaid beneficiaries.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Financing, Health services, Measures, Medicaid, Policy development, Program coordination, Public health infrastructure, Reimbursement, Service integration, Social services

Woolf SH, Aron L, eds; National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. 2013. U.S. health in international perspective: Shorter lives, poorer health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 394 pp.

Annotation: This book presents information about the U.S. health disadvantage, that is, the fact that Americans live shorter lives and experience more illnesses and injuries than people in other high-income countries. The book explores possible explanations and provides recommendations for both government and nongovernment agencies to address the problem. Topics include shorter lives, poorer health, explaining the health disadvantage, framing the question, public health and medical care systems, individual behaviors, social factors, physical and social environmental factors, policies and social values, and a research agenda.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-26414-3.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Environmental influences, Health, Health care systems, Income factors, Injuries, Injury prevention, International health, Prevention, Public health, Public policy, Research, Service delivery system, Social values

Academic Pediatric Association, American Academy of Pediatrics. 2013. APA Task Force on Childhood Poverty: A strategic road-map. McLean, VA: Academic Pediatric Association, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper recognized the increasing prevalence of poverty for children in the United States, and reviews the short- and long-term effects on children's health and well-being. A road-map of strategies is presented involving public policy and advocacy, health care delivery, medical education, and research in a "war on childhood poverty."

Contact: Academic Pediatric Association, 6728 Old McLean Village, McLean, VA 22101, Telephone: (703) 556-9222 Fax: (703) 556-8729 E-mail: info@academicpeds.org Web Site: http://www.ambpeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Child welfare, Children, Health care delivery, Low income groups, Medical education, Professional education, Public policy, Social policy, Socioeconomic factors

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.