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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

National Institute for Children's Health Quality. 2020. National SIDS awareness month social media toolkit. Boston, MA: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 3 pp.

Annotation: This resource contains a collection of social media posts and graphics that can be used to raise awareness about Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and safe-sleep related deaths so that more babies reach year one. They include brief messages that can be posted to Twitter and graphics that can be copied and posted on various social media channels.

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infant death, Prevention, SIDS: Sleep position, Social media

Adolescent and Young Adult National Resource Center. 2019-. #ScreenToInterveneForAYAs: Adolescent and Young Adult Behavioral Health Blog. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs,

Annotation: This blog provides a space for state Title V maternal and child health professionals and their partners to learn about efforts to build better preventive care systems for optimal adolescent and young adult wellbeing across the country.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org

Keywords: Behavior, Adolescent health, Behavioral medicine, Communication, Prevention programs, Social media, State Title V programs, State initiatives, Young adults

American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health. 2015. Fluoridation toolkit: A resource for health advocates. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit for advocates provides resources for educating communities about community water fluoridation. Contents include sample blog posts, a memo for newspaper editors, letters to the editor, tips for talking to reporters, remarks to help parents and health professionals talk to city council or local board members, a resolution observing community water fluoridation's 70th anniversary, and social media messages. A user's guide is included.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 E-mail: fluoride@aap.org Web Site: http://www.ilikemyteeth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Community based services, Fluorides, Mass media, Oral health, Preventive health services, Social media, Water

Health Enhancement Research Organization, Employer-Community Collaboration Committee. 2014. Environmental scan: Role of corporate America in community health and wellness. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine, Roundtable on Population Health Improvement, 68 pp.

Annotation: This report presents results from an environmental scan to document the role and extent of involvement of business in community, public health, and clinical care systems. Contents include the purpose and scope; an overview of the methods including the literature review, stakeholder interviews, and case studies; and results. Topics include key levers and drivers that are important to making the business case for engaging in population health efforts such as workplace wellness, cost savings, and businesses as knowledge base. Additional topics include the role of business in population health and population health strategies. The appendices contain snapshots of foundations, coalitions, and businesses working in community health.

Contact: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Health and Medicine Division, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-2352 Fax: (202) 334-1412 E-mail: HMD-NASEM@nas.edu Web Site: https://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Case studies, Literature reviews, Population health, Public health, Social media

Bouri N, Minton K, Jolani N, Rubin S. 2014. Riding the mobile wave: What local health departments need in order to adopt social media and mobile health technologies for emergency preparedness. Baltimore, MD: UPMC Center for Health Security; Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 41 pp., exec. summ. (5 pp.).

Annotation: This document reports findings from a study to determine what organizational factors local health department staff perceive as necessary to support their use of social media and mobile health technologies for emergency preparedness. Contents include the study methods, findings, and recommendations for policy and practice. Topics include in-house capacity, leadership support and policies, legal and security issues, and audiences. Case studies are also included.

Contact: UPMC Center for Health Security, 621 E. Pratt Street, Suite 210, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (443) 573-3304 Fax: (443) 573-3305 Web Site: http://www.upmchealthsecurity.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Confidentiality, Disaster planning, Health agencies, Legal issues, Local agencies, Policy analysis, Policy development, Research, Social media, Technology

California Mental Health Services Authority and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. 2014. Social media guidelines for mental health promotion and suicide prevention. Reston, VA: Entertainment Industries Council, TEAM Up, 6 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides tips for organizations and individuals communicating about mental health and suicide on social media to reduce stigma, increase help-seeking behavior, and help prevent suicide. Topics include social media strategy, content considerations on mental health and suicide prevention, language and images, building online engagement, privacy and safety concerns, addressing suicide-related posts by others, and additional resources.

Contact: Entertainment Industries Council, 1856 Old Reston Ave, Suite 215, Reston, VA 20190, Telephone: (703) 481-1414 Secondary Telephone: 800-783-3421 Fax: (703) 481-1418 E-mail: eiconline@eiconline.org Web Site: http://www.eiconline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Confidentiality, Electronic communications, Media, Mental health, Social interaction, Social responsibility, Suicide prevention

Gittelman M, Denny S, Southworth H, Arnold MW. 2014. Ohio AAPs comprehensive approach to addressing Ohio's infant safe sleep. American Academy of Pediatrics, Ohio Chapter, 21 pp.

Annotation: This presentation describes efforts by the Ohio chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics to reduce post-neonatal deaths, focusing on pediatrician education about safe sleep, a statewide program, an hospitalist program, and child abuse and maltreatment. It compares these initiatives to its successful bike helmet initiative. Safe sleep marketing and an action plan are described.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Infants, Ohio, Prevention programs, SIDS, Sleep, Social media, State programs, Sudden infant death

Solomon L. 2013. The librarian's nitty gritty guide to social media. Chicago, IL: ALA Editions, 211 pp.

Annotation: This book presents an overview of the social media world, providing context for services like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, and analyzes how adults’ and teens’ use of social media impacts the library. It offers advice on easy ways to use these tools on a daily basis, with planning strategies for posting and scheduling. It also addresses the fine points of Facebook, comparing the various types of profiles and accounts. It guides readers in the basics of crafting eye-catching status updates, and other social media best practices and shows how to manage and monitor accounts, including pointers on dealing with negative feedback.

Contact: American Library Association, 50 East Huron, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (800) 545-2433 Secondary Telephone: (888) 814-7692 Fax: (312) 944-3897 E-mail: library@ala.org Web Site: http://www.ala.org $52, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8389-1160-0.

Keywords: Handbooks, Marketing, Social media

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. Using visual apps to connect with your target audience on social networks. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webinar serves as an orientation to social media and e-learning technologies for MCH and public health professionals. It covers the recent accessibility of social media apps (Instagram, Pinterest, Vine, FiLMiC Pro, and Path) that can maximize the visibility of public health programs. The webinar discusses best practices, provides tips and tricks to help engage target audiences, and explains how to leverage social media networks such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter in maternal and child health programs. Case studies that successfully demonstrate the influence of social media are also presented and discussed.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication skills, Continuing education, Information sources, Internet, MCH training, Public health, Social media, Technology

Kachur R, Mesnick J, Liddon N, Kapsimalis C, Habel M, David-Ferdon C, Brown K, Gloppen K, Tevendale H, Gelaude DJ, Romero L, Seitz H, Heldman AB, Schindelar,J. 2013. Adolescents, technology and reducing risk for HIV, STDs and pregnancy. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, 68 pp.

Annotation: This white paper provides an overview of the ways in which digital technology can be used to improve the sexual health of adolescents. It includes a brief summary of adolescents (including their demography, development, and sexual behavior) and provides an overview of the new digital technologies and media that youth are using. These include networking sites (SNS), video sharing, blogs, instant messaging, mobile technology, and virtual worlds. The paper examines technology’s potential for use in sexual health promotion as well as the risks associated with misuse of digital technology. Included are examples of innovative adolescent sexual health interventions that have used digital technology to improve their reach and effectiveness.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, HIV, Health promotion, Information sources, Internet, Prevention, Risk reduction, Social media, Technology

Advocates for Youth. 2013. Social media 101: Connecting youth to health and social services with Facebook, Twitter, and text messaging. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 2 pp.

Annotation: This online training explains how social media tools can be used by agencies and organizations to establish linkages to health care, and it identifies strategies for establishing links to health and social services using Facebook, Twitter, and text messaging. The training describes what social media is, explains how each of these technology platforms works, and explores how each might be used as part of a social media strategy. In addition to online, the website provides a printable version of the training.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care utilization, Interactive media, Marketing, Service delivery, Social media, Training materials

Bandurraga A, Gowen LK, and the Finding Our Way Team. 2013. I bloomed here: A guide for conducting photovoice with youth receiving culturally- and community-based services. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, 4 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides strategies on implementing a photovoice (PV) project. Topics include how to prepare for implementing PV, what materials are needed, strategies for engaging youth in discussions among themselves and with community leaders to effect change, and "photo ethics" issues that need to be reviewed with youth. Additional resources for understanding the principles and concepts of PV are also included.

Contact: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University, Portland, OR Web Site: http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Communication, Community based services, Culturally competent services, Media, Social change, Young adults

U.S. Department of Agriculture. [2012]. Text4baby and WIC: Building on a shared mission. U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes the partnership between the Text4baby mobile program to promote healthy babies and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service, the National WIC Association, and local WIC agencies. It describes how the partnership reinforces WIC education for pregnant women by providing text4baby's evidence-informed tips and resources via 150-character text messages. The brochure also provides sample text messages; explains how to sign up WIC clients to receive text4baby messages; how to set up WIC appointment reminders using text4baby; and how to promote the use this communication tool.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20250, Telephone: (202) 720-2791 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Federal programs, Health promotion, Infant health, MCH services, Pregnant women, Prevention, Preventive health services, Risk reduction, Social media

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Electronic Media Branch. 2012. CDC's guide to writing for social media. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 58 pp.

Annotation: This publication provides guidance and lessons learned related to creating social media messages for use in health communication campaigns, activities, and emergency response efforts. Topics include writing more effectively using multiple social media channels, particularly Facebook, Twitter, and mobile phone text messaging. The guide is intended for a beginner audience, although some readers with an intermediate level may also find it useful.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Media campaigns, Public awareness campaigns, Social media

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2012. Teen pregnancy and social media: The health communicator's social media toolkit. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This website presents a social media tool to help promote adolescent pregnancy prevention efforts. The quick reference guide, which is intended as a companion piece to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Social Media Toolkit for Health Communicators, highlights a number of social media tools with adolescent-pregnancy-prevention messages from CDC. The website provide badges and buttons that can be placed on websites; contact-syndication information; e-cards; text that can be pasted onto a Facebook page posted on Twitter; links to podcasts, public service announcements, and mobile web pages; and widgets.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Social media, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Health promotion, Prevention

National EMSC Data Analysis Resource Center and Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center. 2012. Using social media professionally to promote EMSC: Social media guidelines and best practices for EMSC grantees (rev. ed.). [Washington, DC]: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 16 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to provide information to Emergency Medical Services for Children grantees on the requirements for planning, design, and best practices for participating and engaging in the social networking sites Facebook and Twitter. The document discusses background, communication strategies, clearance and approval, and security requirements.

Contact: Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) National Resource Center, 801 Roeder Road, Suite 600, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (301) 244-6300 Fax: (301) 244-6301 E-mail: emscinformation@childrensnational.org Web Site: http://www.emscnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Emergency medical services for children, Federal programs, Grants, Guidelines, Programs, Social media

Solomon L. 2011. Doing social media so it matters: A librarian's guide. Chicago,IL: American Library Association, 80 pp. (ALA editions: special reports)

Annotation: This guide explains how libraries can use social media to enhance the services provided by their libraries. It describes how libraries can use tools such as Facebook, Twitter, MySpace, and Linked-In to create and promote resources and services and to enhance the patron's library experience. The guide includes practical advice on choosing, using, and monitoring tools effectively. It explains how to obtain administrative and staff buy-in and how to write a social media policy. It discusses the concept of social capital; recommends strategies for achieving social media success; and suggests methods for evaluating social media services. Best practices and additional resources are provided.

Contact: American Library Association, 50 East Huron, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (800) 545-2433 Secondary Telephone: (888) 814-7692 Fax: (312) 944-3897 E-mail: library@ala.org Web Site: http://www.ala.org $40.00, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8389-1067-2.

Keywords: Communication, Diffusion of innovation, Guidelines, Information sources, Internet, Library services, Model programs, Social media, Standards, Technology

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. The health communicator's social media toolkit [upd. ed.]. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 55 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to provide guidance and to share lessons learned in integrating social media into health communication campaigns, activities, and emergency response efforts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Contents include information on getting started using social media -- from developing governance to determining which channels best meet communication objectives to creating a social media strategy. Additional topics include popular channels to incorporate into a plan such as blogs, video-sharing sites, mobile applications, and RSS feeds.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Social media, Communication, Media, Strategic planning

Michaud M. 2011. Immigrant media making new voices for community health: Lessons and recommendations from the field. [Madison, WI]: New Routes to Community Health, 43 pp.

Annotation: This report offers guidance on how to use the power of local media making as a tool for improving health initiatives in communities experiencing significant health disparities. Intended for community organizations and those who support social change, the report includes guidelines on creating local media for community health improvement, funding and evaluating local media, and infusing the media with new voices. The report explains the research methods used to compile the guidelines, profiles of participants, and an evaluation checklist for those planning to include community or locally-produced media in their social change initiative. It is available in English and Spanish.

Keywords: Community action, Health status disparities, Local initiatives, Media campaigns, Social change, Spanish language materials

Blake S, Oberdorf J, Rasmussen M. 2010. Youth guide to action on maternal health. New York, NY: Women Deliver, 26 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides tools, resources, and information to help young people increase awareness of maternal health issues such as family planning and preventable maternal mortality. Focusing on the use of new media and technology, the guide explains how young people can use and develop messages, projects, and campaigns to promote political, economic, social/cultural, and technological solutions. from becoming informed, to using social media, to evaluating project outcomes. A glossary of terms and a blogroll that provides links to online resources are included as appendices.

Contact: Women Deliver, 584 Broadway, Suite 306, New York, NY 10012, Telephone: (646) 695-9100 Fax: (646) 695-9145 E-mail: info@womendeliver.org Web Site: http://www.womendeliver.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Health promotion, Maternal Health, Public awareness campaigns, Social media, Young adults, Youth

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.