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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 15 (15 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among young children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote the social and emotional health of young children. It includes separate tips for parents, pediatricians, and early education and child care providers. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among teens. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote social and emotional health among adolescents. It includes separate tips for teenagers, parents, schools, and pediatricians. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Mom! Dad! Ask the doctor about my emotional development, too!. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 12 items.

Annotation: These advertising materials promote the importance of mental health as part of a health supervision visit. They are designed to be displayed on a bulletin board or used as a table top display in a pediatric practice. One version focuses on young children and the other on teenagers. Both versions are available in English and Spanish. Other versions are provided for use on Facebook pages or in parent newsletters.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Pediatric care, Public awareness materials, Social interaction

Collective Impact Forum. 2014–. Initiative directory. Boston, MA: Collective Impact Forum, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides information about initiatives that are using the collective impact approach to address social and environmental problems. Users can search for existing initiatives by state/locality, social issue, region, and country. Users can also create a page to highlight the work they are doing; submit information about their progress; hold discussions; and share reports, photos, news, and more.

Contact: Collective Impact Forum, 500 Boylston Street, Suite 600, Boston, MA 02116, Telephone: (866) 351-8484 E-mail: info@collectiveimpactforum.org Web Site: http://www.collectiveimpactforum.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Communities, Community action, Community programs, Directories, Interdisciplinary approach, International programs, Local initiatives, National initiatives, Networking, Problem solving, Social interaction, State initiatives, Teamwork

California Mental Health Services Authority and the National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention. 2014. Social media guidelines for mental health promotion and suicide prevention. Reston, VA: Entertainment Industries Council, TEAM Up, 6 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides tips for organizations and individuals communicating about mental health and suicide on social media to reduce stigma, increase help-seeking behavior, and help prevent suicide. Topics include social media strategy, content considerations on mental health and suicide prevention, language and images, building online engagement, privacy and safety concerns, addressing suicide-related posts by others, and additional resources.

Contact: Entertainment Industries Council, 1856 Old Reston Ave, Suite 215, Reston, VA 20190, Telephone: (703) 481-1414 Secondary Telephone: 800-783-3421 Fax: (703) 481-1418 E-mail: eiconline@eiconline.org Web Site: http://www.eiconline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Confidentiality, Electronic communications, Media, Mental health, Social interaction, Social responsibility, Suicide prevention

Holt K, Barzel R. 2013. Oral health and learning: When children's oral health suffers, so does their ability to learn (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information on the effects of poor oral health on learning in school-age children. Topics include the impact of poor oral health on school performance and social relationships, nutrition and learning, school attendance and learning, and programs for improving oral health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Telephone: (202) 784-9771 E-mail: OHRCinfo@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchoralhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health programs, Learning, Nutrition, Oral health, School attendance, School-age children, Social interaction

Hernandez DJ, Napierala JS. 2012. Children in immigrant families: Essential to America's future. New York, NY: Foundation for Child Development, 37 pp. (FCD child and youth well-being index (CWI) policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on areas in which children in immigrant families are advantaged or disadvantaged, compared with children with both parents born in the United States. The brief presents findings from 1994 to 2010 in the following categories: overall well-being, family economic well-being, health, educational attainment, community engagement, and social relationships. Results for select countries and regions of origin are also presented.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Communities, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Families, Immigrants, International health, Relationships, Research, Social interaction, Statistical data

Benson PL, Scales PC, Leffert N, Roehlkepartain EC. 2011. A fragile foundation: The state of developmental assets among American youth (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 153 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the status of adolescents in terms of developmental assets. The findings are based on data from a survey—"Search Institute Profiles of Student Life: Attitudes and Behaviors"—that measures 40 developmental assets, or positive factors. The document provides information about the following: the background assets and the young people surveyed; young people's experiences of developmental assets; the deficits and patterns of high risk behavior that compromise young people's healthy development; the power of assets in relation to risky behaviors; an overall goal for well-being; and creative tensions that address challenges and opportunities of the report. Each chapter includes text, figures, and tables of data by grade and gender. Appendices offer additional details of other demographic differences.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 0352.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Cultural factors, Decision making, Education, Families, High risk adolescents, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction, Statistics

Bandy T, Moore KA. 2011. What works for promoting and enhancing positive social skills: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 11 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet reviews 38 evaluated programs to identify what works to promote social skills among children and adolescents (such as getting along with others, expressing empathy to others, trying to resolve conflicts, and regulating emotions and behaviors). It highlights programs (27 out of 38) that significantly increased at least one social skill in children and adolescents. It also discusses the effectiveness of programs that incorporated peer-teaching, group discussion, or role modeling, as well as teacher-led instruction. The fact sheet includes a chart summarizing the programs and whether they were found to work, not proven to work, or had mixed findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child development, Children, Community programs, Program evaluation, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Social behavior, Social interaction, Social skills

Terzian M, Hamilton K, Ling T. 2011. What works for acting-out (externalizing) behavior: Lessons from experimental evaluations of social interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 10 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet reviews 38 evaluated programs to identify what works to promote social skills among children and adolescents (such as getting along with others, expressing empathy to others, trying to resolve conflicts, and regulating emotions and behaviors). It highlights programs (27 out of 38) that significantly increased at least one social skill in children and adolescents. It also discusses the effectiveness of programs that incorporated peer-teaching, group discussion, or role modeling, as well as teacher-led instruction. The fact sheet includes a chart summarizing the programs and whether they were found to work, not proven to work, or had mixed findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child development, Children, Model programs, Program evaluation, Psychological development, Psychosocial development, Social behavior, Social interaction, Social skills

Scales PC, Leffert N. 2004. Developmental assets: A synthesis of the scientific research on adolescent development (2nd ed.). Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute, 279 pp.

Annotation: This book examines internal and external factors in the adolescent's successful psychosocial development. The authors describe the framework of their theory of development assets and then discuss each of the assets. External assets include: support assets; empowerment assets; boundaries-and-expectation assets; and constructive-use-of-time assets. Internal assets include: commitment-to-learning assets; positive values assets; social competency assets; and positive identity assets.

Contact: Search Institute, The Banks Building, 615 First Avenue N.E., Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413, Telephone: (612) 376-8955 Secondary Telephone: (800) 888-7828 Contact Phone: (800) 888-7828 Fax: (612) 376-8956 E-mail: si@search-institute.org Contact E-mail: search@search-institute.org Web Site: http://www.search-institute.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: No. 338.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Community role, Decision making, Education, Families, Parent child relationships, Peer groups, Positivism, School role, Self-esteem, Social interaction

Lerner C, Ciervo LA. 2004. Getting ready for school begins at birth: How to help your child learn in the early years. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 12 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet helps parents of young children use everyday interactions to teach their children the basic skills they need to cooperate, get along with others, and be enthusiastic learners. The brochure provide tips for helping children develop skills in four key areas: language and literacy, thinking, self-control, and self-confidence. Tips are divided by age ranges (0-12 months, 12-24 months, and 24-36 months). Information about television viewing and imparting values and beliefs is also included.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $30.00 for packet of 20; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-943657-87-3.

Keywords: Child development, Infant development, Language, Learning, Learning activities, Literacy, Moral values, Parent child relations, Parents, School readiness, Self control, Self esteem, Social interaction, Television, Young children

Greenspan S., Shanker SG. 2002. Toward a psychology of global interdependency: A framework for international collaboration. Bethesda, MD: Interdisciplinary Council on Developmental and Learning Disorders, Council on Human Developmen, 70 pp. (Council on Human Development monographs)

Annotation: This monograph seeks to formulate a psychology of interdependency that will characterize the elements of personal and social organization to help readers understand and prepare for a rapidly advancing interdependent future, particularly in the wake of the terrorist actions on September 11, 2001. Section topics include the different ways groups and nations meet their basic needs; the group processes that will be required to cope with the newly defined unit of survival, "the global group"; the paradigm shift required for understanding human behaviors that will enable individuals to move from deterministic thinking to interdependent, dynamic approaches; and the policies that will be needed to enable families and communities to participate in global interdependency adaptively, rather than destructively.

Contact: Interdisciplinary Council on Developmental and Learning Disorders, 4938 Hampden Lane, Suite 800, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 656-2667 Web Site: http://www.icdl.com $19.00, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Behavioral sciences, Collaboration, Group dynamics, International organizations, Social interaction

Stone D, Patton B, Heen S. 2000. Difficult conversations: How to discuss what matters most. New York, NY: Penguin Books, 250 pp.

Annotation: This book offers advice on handling conversations that cause anxiety and frustration. Topics include deciphering the underlying structure of the difficult conversation, interpreting the significance of what is said and what is not, identifying the erroneous and ingrained assumptions, managing strong emotions, and spotting ways self-image affects the conversation. Examples of conversation types include "what happened", feelings, identity, and creating a learning conversation. Additional information is provided in the "road map" section and notes are given on selected relevant organizations.

Contact: Penguin Group Inc. , 375 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014, Telephone: (212) 366-2000 Web Site: http://us.penguingroup.com $10.20, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 0-14-028852-X.

Keywords: Communication skills, Interpersonal relations, Social interaction

Thom DA. 1933. Guiding the adolescent. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 94 pp. (Bureau publication (United States. Children's Bureau); no. 225)

Annotation: This publication of the U.S. Department of Labor, Children's Bureau is written to assist parents in understanding and guiding adolescent children to a healthy, happy adulthood. Contents include a definition of adolescence and adult attitudes toward adolescence, physical growth and development, attitudes toward sex, adolescence and mental development, the individual as a whole, some educational pitfalls, the question of work, learning to use leisure, asocial conduct, evading reality, the adolescent and his companions, and the needs of the parent.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescence, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent mental health, Consumer education materials, Developmental stages, Peer groups, Puberty, Sexual development, Social behavior, Social interaction, Social skills

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.