Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 15 (15 total).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2015. Community health status indicators (CHSI 2015). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This web application produces health status profiles for each of the 3,143 counties in the United States and the District of Columbia. Each county profile contains indicators of health outcomes, which describe the population health status of a county and factors that have the potential to influence health outcomes, such as health care access and quality, health behaviors, social factors, and the physical environment.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health status, Healthy People 2020, Measures, Outcome and process assessment, Planning, Population dynamics, Population surveillance, Protective factors, Public health, Risk factors, Social indicators

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2014. Life course indicators online tool. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource presents a standardized set of indicators that can be applied to measure progress using the life course approach to improve maternal and child health. The set of life course indicators is organized by category, data source, and domain. For each indicator, the resource includes details such as a brief description, numerator, denominator, data source, similar measures in other indicator sets, and national comparison data. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data sources, Life course, MCH programs, Measures, Program improvement, Social indicators

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. 2014. At a glance for 2014: America's children–Key national indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, biennial.

Annotation: This document presents statistics based on national indicators of child well-being in the United States. Topics include demographic background, family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health.

Contact: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, E-mail: childstats@ed.gov Web Site: http://childstats.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child safety, Children, Data, Family characteristics, Measures, Social indicators, Statistics, Trends

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. 2014. America's young adults: Special issue, 2014. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 84 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the demographic characteristics and well-being of young adults (ages 18-24) against a backdrop of the traditional milestones of adulthood including education; economic circumstances; family formation; civic, social, and personal behavior; and health and safety. Topics include characteristics of young adults, the current opportunities and challenges they face, and the implications of possible trajectories for their futures and their families.

Contact: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, E-mail: childstats@ed.gov Web Site: http://childstats.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Family characteristics, Life course, Social indicators, Statistics, Transitions, Trends, Young adults

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. Women's health USA. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, annual.

Annotation: This report is a compilation of key health statistics from multiple federal sources that highlights trends and disparities in some of the most pressing health challenges facing women. New topics and indicators in 2013 include chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, fast food and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, prediabetes, and patient-centered care. New special population pages feature data on the characteristics and health of women served by community health centers, immigrant women, and lesbian and bisexual women. The website also features individually downloadable figures, tables, and text for easy insertion into presentations and document. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Health behavior, Health care utilization, Health status, Maternal health, Population surveillance, Social indicators, Statistical data, Women

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2013. Community health assessment for population health improvement: Resource of most frequently recommended health outcomes and determinants. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies the metrics -- the population health outcomes and important risk and protective factors -- that, taken together, can describe the health of a community and drive action. Topics include the evolution of community health assessments, community health assessment data, the history of and need for a common set of health outcomes and determinants and the organization of a common set using a population health framework, methods for identifying health outcomes and determinants, existing community-level indicators, and sensitivity analysis.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Measures, Outcome and process assessment, Planning, Population dynamics, Population surveillance, Protective factors, Public health, Risk factors, Social indicators

Child Trends. 2012. Early school readiness: Indicators on children and youth (upd. ed.). [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper explains what it means to be "school ready" and looks at what families, schools, and communities can do to get young children ready for kindergarten. Contents include trends; differences by poverty status, gender, parent's education level, parent's home language, race and Hispanic origin, and age; state and local estimates; international estimates; national goals; what works to make progress; and other related indicators. Data sources, statistical charts, endnotes, and references are provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Cognitive development, Early childhood education, School readiness, Social indicators, Young children

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2011. CDC health disparities and inequalities report -- United States, 2011. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 60(Suppl.):1-113,

Annotation: This report consolidates national data on disparities in mortality, morbidity, behavioral risk factors, health care access, preventive health services, and social determinants of critical health problems in the United States. The focus is on disparities in selected health determinants and outcomes by sex, race and ethnicity, education, income, disability status, and geography. Topics include education and income, housing, air quality, health insurance, influenza vaccination, colorectal cancer screening, infant deaths, motor vehicle-related deaths, suicides, drug-induced deaths, coronary heart disease and stroke deaths, homicides, obesity, preterm births, hospitalizations, asthma, HIV infection, diabetes, hypertension, binge drinking, adolescent pregnancy and childbirth, and cigarette smoking. The rationale for regular reporting on health disparities and inequalities and recommendations for universally applied and targeted interventions are included.

Contact: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr Available from the website.

Keywords: , Access to health care, Health behavior, Health statistics, Health status disparities, Intervention, Morbidity, Mortality, Preventive health services, Risk factors, Social indicators

Seith D, Isaakson E. 2011. Who are America's poor children? Examining health disparities among children in the United States. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the health of America’s children by poverty status from 2007 to 2009, drawing on the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The report identifies a list of publicly available annual indicators within the following five broad areas of health: Environmental health, health insurance coverage, access to healthcare services, behavior, and health outcomes. It includes policy recommendations based on promising practices for reducing health disparities and a look at federal funding that targets at-risk populations. Tables compare health risks and behaviors among poor and non-poor children of various ages ranging from 1 to 17.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Comparative analysis, Economic factors, Low income groups, Measures, National surveys, Reports, Social indicators

Lowe JI. 2010. A new way to talk about the social determinants of health. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 35 pp. (Vulnerable populations portfolio)

Annotation: This guide provides a framework to help health professionals and policymakers effectively communicate about social determinants of health. The content addresses an iterative research and message-development process that includes three steps: determine how policymakers view the world of health, develop messages that can be tested, and strengthen the messages with testing. Additional topics include best practices in the language and framing of social determinants of health; the use of data and information; metaphors that drive how politicians see health disparities; and considering the roles of the mind, brain, and emotions when developing messages.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication skills, Model programs, Oral health, Policy development, Social factors, Social indicators

Iskason E, Higgins LB, Davidson LL, Cooper JL. 2009. Indicators for social-emotional development in early childhood: A guide for local stakeholders. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to give local stakeholders the information and tools necessary to develop and use indicators for social-emotional development. The report includes (1) definitions of key concepts related to establishing indicators; (2) seven recommended indicators for social-emotional development; (3) a framework to determine local priorities and get started with indicator adoption, (4) resources for finding data at the community level for each indicator, and (5) how to interpret and use data collected for each of the suggested indicators. Examples of successful use of these indicators in states and local communities are provided.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Child health, Communities, Community programs, Depression, Emotional development, Mental disorders, Social indicators, Statistical data, Young children

Child Trends Data Bank. 2009. Homeless children and youth. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides statistics on homeless children and youth in the United States. Using 2005-06 data submitted under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, the fact sheet provides data on differences based on age, poverty status, race and ethnicity, and current living situation. The fact sheet provides links to state and local statistics; related child health indicators; and local efforts that have proven effective in improving housing stability. A chart indicates the distribution of U.S. children under 18, according to parents' race/ethnicity.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Data, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Homelessness, Racial factors, Social indicators, Statistics, Youth

Lippman L. 2005. Indicators and indices of child well-being: A brief history. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 15 pp. (KIDS COUNT working paper)

Annotation: This working paper provides a brief history of indicators and indices of child well-being in the United States, beginning in the 1960s and continuing through 2003. References are included.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, Kids Count, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 Web Site: http://www.aecf.org/MajorInitiatives/KIDSCOUNT.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, History, Social indicators

Brindis C, Cagampang H, Oliva G. 2001. Bridging the gap: Next steps in developing and using indicators to improve adolescent health. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center, 22 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides recommendations for developing and using indicators to improve adolescent health. The paper discusses (1) the value of using indicators to improve health, (2) creating consensus in youth development as a means of advancing the indicator agenda, (3) linking indicators of youth development and protective factors to social contextual indicators, (4) developing analytical approaches to expand the utility of existing information, and (5) the needs of communities in utilizing indicator information. A vision for the future concludes the paper.

Contact: National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco, LHTS Suite 245, Box 0503, San Francisco, CA 94143-0503, Telephone: (415) 502-4856 Fax: (415) 502-4858 E-mail: nahic@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://nahic.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Community role, Social indicators

Child Trends. Positive indicators. Washington, DC: Child Trends,

Annotation: This website provides information on indicators of flourishing among children, adolescents, and young adults for inclusion in national surveys, research studies, and program evaluations. Topics include the need for positive indicators and efforts to develop and disseminate them. Information and resources from Child Trends' Flourishing Children Project, including constructs, item development and review, cognitive interviews, pilot test, and psychometric work are included. A webinar, data access agreement, publications, and interview protocols are available from the website.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Development, Measures, Research methodology, Social indicators, Young adults

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.